Love Charter, The [Old Edition]

August 1, 2003

Table of Contents

CHARTER OF RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS

DAD'S FOREWORD

       About three weeks before Dad's Homegoing, he spent three days reading the Charter, making his corrections, suggestions and additions. He then wrote the following note on his copy of the Charter and gave it to those of us who were working on it.

       Wow! It's humongous! It took me 3 days just to proofread! Thanks! ILY! Terrific!—Almost terrifying!—Ha! PTL!! Tough!—But needed. It certainly is strict and specific!—I'd like to write a foreword explaining the need and the Scriptural basis and precedents. OK?—Thanks! GBY!

       In the days following, during Dad's regular class time with the Home, he went on to say the following about the Charter:

       Do you want to know what I think about this Charter? I agree that it's needed. In the long run, every government and even every major denomination found out they had to have a constitution or a charter, some body of law that governs them. That's what our Charter is, it's a constitution. It's our body of laws that you refer to when you have a problem. Our Family leadership felt we needed to have a basic body of laws so that when the Homes have a problem on any particular subject they can look it up and find out what the rule is.

       Every government, every denomination, every organization always winds up in the long run finding out that they've got to have a body of laws to which the people can refer: "This is what we stand for. This is the way we see it. This is what we think is the right thing to do."—And now we've got it.

       Your leaders have worked very hard to go through the MO Letters to find out what I've said about this or what the Lord said about that, and they've included it in the Charter. Our Charter is a summation of the way we should run our Homes and conduct ourselves, our rules.—The Revolutionary Rules! We've had them before, but they were briefer; they only covered one page when I wrote them! Ha!—Well, I must admit the Family was a lot smaller and less difficult to govern then.

       This Charter should be helpful to our Family when they have problems. It should help make it easier for them to find solutions. Just about everything is covered in that Charter! I don't know anything they didn't cover.

       A few days later he said:

       We don't expect everybody to understand everything that's in the Charter, but it's there to refer to if there are any matters of controversy. But I do think we are going to have to require every shepherd to be familiar with it because they need to enact it, and the over-shepherds need to act as judges, helping to judge situations as they arise.

       Selected quotes from Dad (received in prophecy), since the implementation of the Love Charter:

       Every rule in the Charter was based on "What would be the most loving thing to do?" Every person, every leader, every shepherd, no matter what the rule must ask himself, "Am I applying and administering this rule in love?" No matter how loving the rules were intended to be, if it's not administered in love, it has lost its usefulness. It is null and void. You have lost the Spirit. You do not have the Lord's love. The most important thing is love.

       They need to study the Charter and understand the spirit of the Charter. It's a Love Charter! The only way it can bring forth the fruit that the Lord wanted it to bring forth is if it's put into practice in love and humility with everybody choosing to serve one another in love.

       I also know that there are many sides to all stories, and you've cover ed this with the Charter. You've made it possible for all people to be judged fairly, against the same standard, no question; everybody knows what is expected. They also know if they cross over those lines, that there are rules and judgments in place. This is fair. It's equitable. So use it! Tell those that question you just to do what the Charter says to do.

       From this Side I see how much went into the Charter. How many helpers helped you to create it. How much wisdom they poured forth through you. How much guidance was given. These matters are covered, so use them. Use them as they are written.

       That's the greatest thing, learning to love others and work with them in love. That's what the Charter is all about. It is not about rules and laws and rights, it's about love! It's about the Lord's love for folks, and their love for one another.

       If these who sin are not judged in some way, corrected and chastened, it chips away the truth of the Charter, the veracity of it, the strength of it, it begins to lose its effect, for people must see that it is equitable.

       Now [with the Charter] it is all even. It is fair. It is judged in love, but judged nevertheless.

       You shepherds must have conviction to do that which is right. You must uphold the standard, the Word—not a false standard, but the standard of the Word, the standard laid out in the Charter, the standard of love based on the Word of God. People will respect you if you stand for the Word and if you show them love.

INTRODUCTION

The Love Charter!—God's Call to a Love Revolution!       [Maria #246       ML #2963       1/95]

—By Maria

       1. Dear Family—each one of you who is so precious and means so much to me, to Dad and to the Lord—something wonderful is about to happen! You are about to receive a great treasure. The Lord has heard your desperate heart cries and He has answered. He has seen your tears of desire to be closer to your children and have a stronger bond of love with them. He has seen your frustration s at not being able to do what you felt He was showing you. He has known your great need for a loving touch and for someone to lie beside you with their arms around you and tell you they care.

       2. He has felt your burning desire to throw off the chains of conformity and the heavy burdens of the blobs and be better able to follow Dad's vision and the Letters. He has heard your cries to have more time seeking His face and hearing from Him. He has heard your prayers for the opportunity to be yours elf and exercise your individual gifts that He has given you. "He has seen your tears, He has heard your prayers, behold, He will heal you" (2Kings 20:5).

       3. If you have done your best, but the restrictions of a large, institutionalized Home, or leadership, tradition or peer pressure have made it almost impossible for you to operate in full faith, the Charter will free you to manifest God's gifts and power in your life. For many of you who feel you have done all you can do, you have gone as far as you can go, the Charter will be God's healing touch for you and the entire Family.

       4. The members of my earthly teamwork—wonderful, marvelous people, who, by the way, love the Lord and me and you very much—said to me, "Mama, we think you need to say something to the Family about the Charter. You need to tell them what you think about it. They're hearing from Dad, they're hearing from us via the Charter itself, but they need to hear what you, their queen, feel about such an important document that will have an explosive impact and such far-reaching repercussions and that will bring about monumental changes in the Family."

       5. So I asked my Heavenly teamwork—my precious Jesus and my wonderful David—"What do You want me to tell the Family about the Charter?" "Tell them that it is our gift of love to them," came the reply. "It is the means by which they can be set free to truly love. It is My Word and the heart of David, and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. Tell My Family that this Charter is a set of loving rules to help them to be happy, and to set them free from rules, to give them the right to love, rules to give them the responsibility to love. Tell them that it is our love for them."

       6. As you read and study this Charter, ask the Lord to help you to feel the spirit of it—to help you to see Dad's heart and life in its pages, the whole essence of what he and the Lord mean the Family to be. See it as a guide to direct us back to the basics—the basics of love.—To love the Lord with all our heart, with all our soul, and with all our mind; to love each other and bear each others' burdens; to love our children and train them in the way they should go; and to love the lost by sharing the love of Jesus with them. Our Charter is a guidebook to help us lovingly live the Words of David.

       7. The Charter is the mechanism by which we can live the Law of Love. You are being offered a vehicle that can transport you into a wonderful life of love! It is a structure that can help us do a better job of loving. On the other hand, if you see it only as an "end" and not as a "means to an end," it could then seem only a humongous list of rules and regulations, that, even though they were in the Letters all the time, have finally caught up with you, and will now have to be conformed to!

       8. As always, the letter of the law is dead and cold without the Spirit. For example, God's great love gift of salvation is used by some Christians to bless t he world by sharing His love with the lost, while others use it to hinder the world through bondage to the legalism of the law, thus making His love of none effect.

       9. Likewise, this Charter can be used as a vehicle to propel you to heights of love you've never known, or it can bring further bondage and unhappiness. The Lord said, "The Charter was made for the Family and not the Family for the Charter." We will never set the world free with love if we are bound by the law. The fulfillment of t he law must be love.

       10. When you read the Charter, when you study it, when you think of it, when you apply it, think of love. It is our Love Charter, given by the Lord and Dad in love, written by Peter and our teamworkers in love, then labored over by your leadership in love, and studied and prayed over by many other Family members in love.

       11. It is a new day, and the Lord is calling for a Love Revolution. Our Family is dry and thirsty for the Spirit and needs a massive infusion of love. Some of our children are questioning and unfulfilled, and all need to feel our love. The world is dark and evil and needs to feel our healing touch, our warm concern, our tears and our compassion. Now is the time not to just read about love, nor talk about it, nor call ourselves by it, but to do it! This is our last chance to be the Family God wants us to be, and to love everyone in every circumstance. In order to do this we must have a great change in our personal lives, in our spirits, in our attitudes, in our schedules, in our Homes, in our leadership structure.

       12. We believe that the Charter will help to bring this about. It will help you to have a truly happy Home, with loving and fulfilled mothers, fathers, young people and children who feel so happy and loved that their joy and peace and enthusiasm for life overflows on all they meet, as they go out with broken hearts to find Jesus' sheep, who they can heal with His love.

       13. The implementation of the Charter will be a very big change for many of you. It will cause you to re-evaluate your entire life. It will give you the motivation to change many things. It will result in new pioneering efforts and exercising your faith. It may be scary launching out into unknown terrain both in the spirit and in the physical. It will cause you to be very desperate, and will certainly draw you much closer to Jesus and make you hang on very tightly, which in turn will cause you to love Him more, which in turn will cause you to love others more.

       14. Dad has gone home to the marvelous, wonderful spirit world in order to help us to learn to love. As so many of you have testified, I'm sure that you feel a personal change in your life as a result of Dad's Homegoing. Remember that it is his greatest desire that you will learn to love more fully, both for your own happiness as well as the happiness of others.

       15. I have felt Dad's influence very strongly in the past few weeks, as has our CRO leadership who recently participated in Summit '95. I have felt him moving us in the direction of being more loving. We have been found wanting—lacking in enough love for the Lord and enough love for our brothers and sisters.

       16. Just like you, we, the leadership of the Family, are also having a major revolution in our lives. In my case, the Lord showed me that I had to stop almost completely my regular routine of dictating messages and answering questions and proofreading pubs in order to show more love to the people around me. He said, "You must be a sample, not only a sermon. There are folks right here beside you who need your love. You can't preach to the Family about love unless you live it. The love which you have so freely received, you must also freely give."

       17. The Lord had to help me to see that loving people is not time wasted, no matter how many other important things I need to do. It benefits everyone. It gives happiness, joy, comfort and security to those involved personally, and to those whom their lives touch, in print or in person; likewise, it results in lessons that I can share with you. Similarly, your investment in loving others will reap great dividends and will touch and change many.

       18. You may think that what you can do is so meager, but "little is much if God is in it," and He will multiply your love in ways that will amaze you. I had to relearn the lesson that by loving people I am practicing what I preach, and my preaching will therefore be much more powerful, and you will be able to see and feel the difference. If we can say, "Today, I took time to love," how happy Jesus and Dad will be. How happy we will be!

       19. Today I did take time to love, and it was a good day! I felt like I really accomplished something, something that will last forever and something that the Lord is well pleased with. Today I took time to love!—And I was loved in return! This evening I spent an hour with my precious children, one on either side of me. I held their hands and Techi laid her head on my shoulder, and David put his head against mine and we had sweet prayer and fellowship, talking about the events of the day and things the Lord is doing in our lives.

       20. Today I took time to love.—And I was loved in return! I lay on my bed with Peter with his arms around me and we fellowshipped and prayed for the Lord to lead me in my dictation of this Letter to you. Today I took time to love.—And I received love in return! My faithful secretary came into the room to get a tape to transcribe and I invited her to lie down with me and I put my arms around her, and we had a sweet loving talk about situations in our Home and prayer for the dear people that we live and work with. It was a sweet cuddle time that made us feel very close to each other and helped us to feel the Lord's love.

       21. Today I took time to love!—And received love in return! I called one of my other teamworkers on the intercom and prayed and chatted with him and heard some more of the events in his life before his salvation and joining the Family. I was getting to know him better and appreciating him more, and it was very rewarding.

       22. Today I took time to love!—One of the dear shepherds of our Home came in to see me for some fellowship and prayer. He's not just the shepherd of our Home; he's a real friend who helps me sometimes, too!—Such a wise, loving, caring man.

       23. Today I took time to love!—And I received love in return. I prayed for you, our precious Family, for your healing and your comfort, for your faith and your love!—And I was blessed! And at the end of the day, I feel strengthened in spirit. During the course of my day, the Lord even provided time for me to listen to phone messages, to dictate answers.—Not as much time as before, but enough to do what was necessary. One thing is needful, and that is to love . In love lies our strength!

       24. Before his Homegoing, our beloved David read the draft of our Charter and conveyed his thoughts and ideas about it. As he explains in his foreword to the Charter, he saw the need for it, though he commented it seemed "tough and strict." The Lord took him home to Heaven before the Charter was completely finalized, and from the spirit world Dad was able to help us to more fully understand the Lord's purpose for the Charter—to help us to love.

       25. Here is some of what the Lord said in prophecy through leadership regarding our Love Charter, Dad's role in helping to finalize it, and God's will for us to be fill ed with His love, in order to pour it forth to all:

       26. For My Spirit will be more unto you and closer to your ear and your bosom than ever before, through the spirit of your Father David who has now come closer to Me to help Me. I have called him for such a time as this. For as you are now at the onset of formulating the boundaries of My Family, should not I have called him who has willed and wished to gather My children unto Me, the one who cared for each one of the souls that he has called unto Me? I have called him unto Me to help define those laws of the Spirit that he has taught you over the years. For he it is that has loved so many into My Kingdom, and his love will be greatly instrumental in this day of formulating what this Family should be.

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       27. Behold, your Aquarius stands before Me and pleads for My people, and pleads that you may be replenished and you may be refreshed, and that you may be renewed in the spirit of the Holy Ghost and in the spirit of power.

* * *

       28. Therefore, rejoice and be exceeding glad, for I do give unto you a fresh and new approach. ... For your Family is My Family, and it has been weary, and it has tired, and it has been worn. But I have called My David and do pour through him to give a refreshing. For behold, the time of the latter rain is at hand, and I do pour upon you showers of blessing that flow from the fountain of David, My cheerful giver, My anointed one, the one who has given in pain and in sorrow, yet with a smile and a tear.—A tear of joy that he has cried unto Me for the ecstasies which I have given to him, and which he does bestow upon you.

       29. Therefore, rejoice, for you shall put on newness of life, and I will give unto you energy, and I will give unto you strength. ... And as I did pour upon My disciples a mighty anointing to reap the harvest after I had gone, I shall pour forth My Spirit without measure. ... Therefore, be you exceeding glad! Rejoice with Me, for I will give unto you joy unspeakable and full of glory, and I will bestow upon you such love!

       30. Have I not already given unto you the kisses of My servant? Has he not forgiven you for your many sins? Has he not looked upon you with eyes of sure and tender mercies? And has he not held you in his arms with a gentle embrace and caressed you with his soft and tender hands? I seek to love My sheep with gentleness. I seek to feed My sheep with love. I seek to pour the sure mercies of David upon all that thirst for life and love and joy. Therefore, receive My Spirit, receive My joy, and your David shall be with you even until the end.

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       31. Behold the heart of the law. The spirit of the Charter is for you, My people, to know Me and to love Me through the laws of David which I, the Lord your God, have spoken unto you. It is My will for you to exercise your own faith, which I have given you, and for you to be happy and fruitful. The spirit of the Charter is the will of your Father David. The law was given unto Moses , but mercy, understanding and grace were given through My Son Jesus. Think not that I have come to abolish the law, but I have come to fulfill every precept of the law.

       32. You have to understand the spirit of the Charter. ... As the body without the spirit is dead, the Charter without the spirit, without understanding of the weakness of My people, is of no avail. Therefore study and know how to advise the world so that My people shall have peace throughout the land.

       33. Consider the timing with which I have taken your father unto Me, and you shall be very much aware that the dark days are ahead. My people have to stand upon their own faith, their own initiative. Earthly communication might be cut off, but heavenly communication is always there. And if you can teach them how to abide by the spirit of the Charter by teaching them how to connect with the Source of My Charter, then even though the days ahead are going to be dark and confused, My people shall be blessed with peace and plenty because they abide in My Word.

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       34. For it is a new day and it is a new age and it is a new era. ... And it shall be a refreshment unto you, and it shall be a great change, and it shall be a great inspiration as you allow My Spirit to flow through you freely, without burden, without strain. It shall be a great blessing unto you to learn the love of the brethren, and to learn the joy of acting in unity together.

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       35. You are in need of retooling ... to be refitted to the new will of My new revolution. ... This shall be a day to let the Queen of Love come forth in your own heart and lead the way in love. Be not led by your own impulses, your own ways of looking at things. It is a day for the Queen of Love, My Holy Spirit, to pour forth out of every man's heart.

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       36. I have seen you and have admired your faithfulness. But I have longed to give you this gift of love as well, that your hearts might flow more freely in love, in the beauty and the joy of My Spirit.

       37. Open up your box and let the refreshing waters of My Word and of My life and love and liberty roll through. For I would fill you to overflowing. I would give you the Spirit of My loving life much more freely. This I desire for you, for I love you for your love for Me and your faithful, diligent laboring in My field. ... I would that you might experience the fullness of My joy, the fullness of My fellowship and the love of your brethren in greater measure. For I would that you might be fulfilled, and I desire to minister to you this special love, these new gifts of love.

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       38. As you give forth I will pour into you, and you shall be channels without obstruction. You shall hold hands together as a circle and you shall be a circuit of My Spirit. Each one of you is needed—each talent, each insight, each mouth—for each one of you is a variation of My love, each one of you is an example of My love. But you shall be unified hand upon hand, spirit upon spirit, experience up on experience, understanding upon understanding. And in one body will I use you.

       39. Hold fast to each other that I may use you to the full. For you will look unto Me and you will also look unto each other, for in unity there will be strength. There is a need for this closeness. There is a need for meeting and for praying together, for relying upon each other, for honesty, for laying your heads upon each other's shoulders, for comforting each other, for strengthening each other, for holding each other up.

* * *

       40. I have given unto you sweet love and tenderness and an affectionate heart. Let it be used as a tool in My hand to give love and tenderness to those who hunger, to those who are wounded and infirm and in need of cheer and comfort and a gentle hand.

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       41. It is a new time of greater power and greater anointing. Therefore lift up your heart and your hands to Me, receive of Me all that I have to give you. For I would pour My love into you with great abundance, that you might pour out unto others. I would pour My Spirit upon you with great abundance, that you might shine forth upon others.

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       42. Open up. ... Give, give, and give and give and give, for I will pour out My Spirit in such measure that it will cause a mighty awakening in the land. ... It is a time of feeding, a time of pouring, a time of thundering, of the heavens opening up. It is a time of the flooding of My Spirit; a time of the feeding of My Words; a time of the Birthday Warning being fulfilled, where I will publish My Words in double measure; a time of Pandita Ramabai; a time of giving and giving and giving and pouring forth. And yet as you give, you shall come to life in great measure. It will be a time of enlightenment, a time of refreshing.

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       43. My little children of Kingdom Come, have I not said before that I have set you in My school? Why do you fear now to graduate, to take the step that I have placed before you, into a school of greater freedom and greater responsibility? This is nothing to fear, but it is a time to rejoice! For the gold and precious stones shall shine as never before, and you shall see a Family and a building and a house for Me which you shall marvel at! For the foundation of God stands sure, and that which has been of Me shall stand, and it shall be a thing of marvel and a thing of strength, and a thing that I can use and work through as never before in the days to come.

PREFACE

       The "Love Charter," which is made up of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules," was not written to legislate righteousness. Our hope and prayer is that these documents will help us to fulfill Jesus' two most important commandments: To love God and each other.

       The "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" attempts to clearly define the responsibilities which Charter Members, Homes and leadership are expected to live up to as the standard of discipleship. It also explains the rights of the individual Charter Member and of Family parents and children, as well as the rights of the Charter Home. The Charter also defines the methods to be used in the governing of our Family Homes, and the authority of all levels of leadership.

       The rule that should be emphasized above all is the Law of Love. We should strive to make it the cardinal rule by which we all abide when exercising our rights, when fulfilling our responsibilities, and when obeying the rules. "And above all things have fervent love among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins" (1 Peter 4:8).

       Before you begin reading the Charter itself, here are a few words of explanation to guide you in your study of it:

       * The format of the Charter: You'll notice that it is presented in two levels. The first level printed in bold text is the root clause, followed by the explanation in normal text. The root clauses carry more weight than the explanation because they are the precisely worded statutes which make up the core of the Charter.

       * The explanations are included to help clarify and explain the root clauses, and to help you catch the spirit or intent of the root clause. Within some of the explanations there are examples and scenarios included to help you see the practical application of the root clauses. Obviously these examples and scenarios do not cover every situation, nor are they meant to be laws in themselves. They are included simply to better help you catch the spirit of the rule itself. All references to other sections of this book have been italicized.

       In some cases there are confirmatory quotes from the Letters or WS advisories, usually included at the end of the explanations, with these quotes offset with indentation.

       * Terms in the Charter: You will notice throughout the root clauses of the Charter that we don't use the term "Home teamworks" when referring to shepherds and leaders of the Home. We call them the "Home's officers." Likewise, the CROs are often referred to as "continental officers" and your VSs as "area officers" throughout the Charter. The Charter is designed to be an enduring document. So rather than having to update the root clauses every time the Family changes terms like "colony shepherd" to "Home servant," or "Home teamwork" to "Home shepherds," and so forth, we have opted for these more general terms, such as "Home officers." However, in the explanation sections of the Charter, those p arts not in bold text, we have used the more common terms like Home teamwork, etc. (You will find a list of definitions for many terms following this preface.)

       In the root clauses, when the CROs are referred to individually they are called the "continental officers"; when they are referred to collectively they are called the "continental office." Likewise, when Visiting Servants (VSs) are referred to individually, they are "area officers" and collectively as the "area office." There will be no more NAS, GAS, DAS or LAS positions. Between the Home teamwork level and the CRO level, the only actual "area officer" leadership will be Visiting Servants (VSs), appointed by the CROs and subject to a vote of confirmation by the Homes every six months.

       * The "Fundamental Family Rules": Following the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights," you will find the "Fundamental Family Rules," which is a summary of all rules and guidelines from past Letters which are still in effect with the enactment of the Charter.

       * Appendixes: A section of helpful appendixes follows the "Fundamental Family Rules," containing: A glossary with definitions of some of the more complex words; a section of forms; the Home Self-Evaluation Checklist; updated Home Election Guidelines; a summary of the "Family Discipline Guidelines;" a Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication, the updated Babes Basic Course, a suggested list of Priority Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family, and our Statement on Fellow Members. (All of these appendixes may be photocopied.)

       * Index: At the very end of this book you'll find a thorough index which will direct you to all the references on any given topic in the Charter.

       * Amendments: This symbol <<[New]>> in the left margin means that the clause or explanation has been amended since the first edition of the Charter.

<<[New]>>

       * Age designation: Although the full application of the Charter is for Cha rter Members who are 16 and older, children under that age are also generally expected to uphold the same standard of behavior outlined in the Charter. However a child's parent(s) or legal guardian(s) must agree to any disciplinary procedures for Charter infractions by their children. (See also Rights of Parents, point C.)

       * Local laws: The Charter covers the Family's religious beliefs and policies. Certain Charter policies may not conform to the laws in every single country, so be sure to c heck the laws regarding your activities in the country in which you live.

       It is our sincere and desperate prayer that you, our Family, will understand and apply the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules" in a loving manner, and in so doing will be happier and more fulfilled than ever in your service for Jesus!

DEFINITION AND EXPLANATION OF TERMS

Terms used in the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules":

       Accounts Payable: financial obligations owed to others by your Home, which are due on given dates; for example, $300 owed to the Home loan fund

       Accounts Receivable: funds owed to your Home by others, that are due to be received on given dates

       Age Determination: when an age is specified in the Charter, such as "18 years of age," it always means those who h ave passed the birthday of the age stated

       Area Officers: leaders above the Home level but below the continental office level, presently the Visiting Servants (VSs).—Collectively known as the area office

       Assets: all of a person's or Home's goods: reserves, surpluses, cash, accounts receivable, and material belongings

       Babe: a new, non-voting Charter Member who has been in the Family less than six months; or a rejoining member during the first six months he or she is back in the Family

       Chi ldren: Family members under the age of 16

       City: when "city" is used throughout the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules," it is referring to an actual city, town or village, not a metropolitan area

       Closed City: a city where the opening of further Homes is not permitted without CRO approval

       Continental Area: a specific geographical area, designated by WS leadership, and overseen by continental officers

       Continental Officers: WS officers appointed by WS leadership to oversee a continen tal area.—Collectively known as the continental office. Presently they are known as CROs

<<[New]>>

       Current Operating Expenses: the current month's rent, phone, utilities, food, transportation, and other regular monthly expenses incurred in the normal running of a Home (Seed corn is not included, as that should be linked directly to tool distribution and handled separately.)

       Dating: to go out socially with a member of the opposite sex, or to engage in an emotional or romantic relationship with a member of the opposite sex

       Debt: late or non-payment of financial obligations; for example, overdue rent or Home loan payment

       Excommunication: a disciplinary action ranging from excluding a member from Family literature and fellowship, to the less severe partial excommunication that may allow continued membership, but the lose of certain privileges as outlined in the Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members.

<<[New]>>

       Family Aid Fund (FAF): fund to which all Charter Member Homes donate 1% and WS 10% of their monthly income, to be used for pioneer gifts, HER fund, Tool funds, "passed on" [death] gifts, Home loans, baby bonuses and, funds permitting, medical emergencies

       Fellow Member: non-Charter Family member who is saved, completes a monthly TRF, tithes and fulfills the responsibilities of Fellow Members, as outlined in the Appendix I.

       Full Excommunication: disciplinary action resulting in a member being expelled from living in a Charter or Fellow Home, exclud ed from all but GP/DFO Family literature, and which may result in the member being excluded from all Family fellowship for an indefinite period of time

       Fundamental Family Beliefs: Biblical and revealed beliefs, which Charter Members must believe to retain their Charter membership

       Guardian: one specifically authorized by a child's parent(s) to assume the responsibility of the parent(s), in the absence of the parent(s)

       Home: a Family community where members reside

       Home Council Meeting: a m eeting to discuss Home matters in which a minimum of 50% of the Home's voting members must be present

       Home Officers: Home shepherds, elected by the Home's voting members, presently known collectively as the Home teamwork

       Home Referendum: a voting procedure called for by a continental office to vote on matters pertaining to a specific area or country

       Home Regulations: rules applying to an individual Home, adopted through a simple majority vote of the Home members, which must be obeyed and a dhered to by them

       Home Schooling Program: also referred to as the Home Schooling Kit

       Home Teamwork: Home officers elected by the Home

       Homes' Monthly Report: Tithers' Report Form (TRF)

       Intellectual Copyright Material: a legal term referring to any original works of an author or composer which he has written, created or made, etc., and encompassing the general areas of copyright, trademarks, patents, etc

       Legal Age: the age at which a minor becomes legally recognized as an adult; this dif fers from country to country

       Liabilities: all of the Home's and members' financial obligations: accounts payable

       LIM: WS-sponsored translation center

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       Lit Library: Home library containing Family literature and fully accessible to Charter voting members. Ages 14 and 15 are also allowed to read all Family lit unless specified otherwise or designated for an older age group. Those under 14 may read those pubs designated for them, and other Family lit at the parents' discretion. The H omeARC and the Member's Only Web site are considered part of the Lit Library

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       Live-in Non-Family Young Person: young person staying temporarily in a CM Home for a designated period of time while looking for employment or housing. Or until they are able to adequately get set up elsewhere, or who is underage and remaining with his parents until he is old enough to move out on his own

       Live-Out Member: friends who are saved, regularly fellowship with the Home, attend meetings, witness and tithe or give substantially to your Home or WS

       Mass Distribution Outreach Tools: publications, either written, audio (cassette or CD), or video, intended for distribution to the general public

       Metropolitan Area: large city or urbanized area including adjacent suburbs and towns

       Net Income: funds remaining after the tithe, 1% FAF contribution, and seed corn have been deducted

       New Disciple: term used for stats-keeping purposes, to be entered on the first TRF after a member has lived in a Charter Home for at least 20 days; otherwise known as a babe

       Non-National: Charter Member who is not eligible to hold a passport of the country in which he is presently living; nor a spouse or child of a passport-holding national of that country

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       Minimum Responsibility: parenting teamwork that is formed from the time a single woman realizes that she is pregnant until her child has his or her first birthday

       Partial Excommunication: less severe form of discipline than Full Excomm unication. Allows for continued membership, but the loss of certain privileges as outlined in the Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members.

       Probationary Notice: a disciplinary measure imposed on a Home by an area or continental office, as a result of infractions committed in violation of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or "Fundamental Family Rules"

       Probationary Status: a disciplinary measure imposed on a Home member by their Home by a majority vote, for infractions committed in violation of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or "Fundamental Family Rules"

       Publications: includes the medium of printed literature, audio or videotapes, CDs, disks, etc

       Road Team: witnessing team temporarily on a road trip, who still appear on their Home's TRF

       Road Team Home: a Home with no permanent residence, which is mobile and reports as a Home; for example, a Home living in caravans or trailers

       Seed Corn: fixed amount of money (the cost of each tool) which you shou ld set aside, before deducting the tithe, from the gifts you receive when you distribute tools, to be used to purchase new tools. (In other words, the seed corn itself does not need to be tithed. For more information on how to handle seed corn see question no.12 in FSM 331, "Answers to Your Tithing, FAF, HER, Pioneer Gift, & Home Loan Questions")

       Sensitive Country: country that due to its political, religious or otherwise sensitive nature may be potentially dangerous or problematic for a Home operating there, requiring closer oversight of the Homes' activities by the continental office

       Service Home: Family Home that offers a service to the Family communities in a city, area, or internationally. Under the supervision of the continental office

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       Sexual Activity: any sexual relations, including deep kissing

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       Sexual Contact: any sexual relations that go further than deep kissing

       Simple Majority: a vote in which the will of over 50% of the voting members determines the outcome of the vote

       Tithe: 10% of all cash income to be given to the Lord via World Services

       Two-thirds Majority: a vote in which at least 67% (two out of three voting members) must give an affirmative vote for the measure to pass

       Voting Member: member of a Home who has reached the age of 16 and has been in the Family for at least six months and is not on Probationary Status or Partial Excommunication

RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUAL CHARTER MEMBERS

       The Family is a Christian Missionary Church dedicated to preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ to all throughout the world. All Family members have received Jesus as their personal Savior and have been baptized with the Holy Spirit. It is our belief that God has called all Charter Members as disciples to serve Him in the Family. As such, each Charter Member has responsibilities to both God and the Family, and also certain rights guaranteed to them in God's Word.

1. RESPONSIBILITIES OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

       The Responsibilities of Individual Members outlines what Charter Members are responsible to do if they wish to remain Charter Members. Charter Family members are already fulfilling these responsibilities, so defining them merely reflects the way we are presently living.

       Of course, no one is perfect, and if at some time you fail in fulfilling some of these responsibilities it won't necessarily result in your losing your Charter membership. However, if you regularly fail to fulfill them, or violate or contravene them, you will be in danger of losing your Charter membership by being moved to Fellow Member status.

       These responsibilities are very important, as they outline our standard of discipleship and are the criterion for remaining a part of the Charter Family.

Charter Members should:

A. Maintain a close connection with God through personal communion with Jesus, personal and united prayer and praise, personal and united reading o f His Word (both the Bible and the Letters), Scripture memorization, and the minimizing and resisting of ungodly and unedifying influences in their lives; thus exhibiting the fruits of the Holy Spirit, which are: "Love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance" (Galatians 5:22,23).

       As Charter Members, each of us should strive to have a deep relationship with Jesus through prayer, praise, the written Word and personal prophecy. As disciples we should pray , both individually and with others, and we should strengthen our spirits by spiritually feasting upon God's Word, privately and unitedly.

       We should also "resist the Devil" (James 4:7) by actively striving to minimize the ungodly and unedifying influences in our lives. These ungodly and unedifying influences could be anything that pulls us away from the Lord or pollutes our spirit, mind or heart with "junk food" of the spirit and hinders our connection with God. This would include the reading of unedifying or ungodly material, or the watching of unedifying videos, movies or TV, playing unedifying computer games, or listening to ungodly music.

       Undoubtedly our day-to-day work and outreach will put us in positions where we might come in contact with ungodly and unedifying influences, but we should attempt to minimize them by not intentionally inflicting upon ourselves those things that we know to be ungodly or unedifying.

       We want to be a sample of His Love to others.—To constantly practice walking in Love and in His Spirit, manifesting in our lives the fruits of the Spirit. ... We are striving to "put on the Lord Jesus Christ" and to let Him make us into the kind of loving, Christ-like people He wants us to be (Maria #76:8).

B. Believe that David was God's Endtime Prophet and that Maria is God's chosen and anointed successor, who has inherited David's mantle as God's Prophetess.

       There are a number of differences between the churches and us, but the main one is that God gave us David, His Endtime Prophet, as our founder, shepherd and leader. Through the years Dad trained Maria as his successor, and with his passing, the Lord has anointed her as His Prophetess and Shepherdess of the Family. Years ago, in prophecy through Dad the Lord said, "When David is taken from thee, you shall be known as a prophetess, and you shall be heeded as the Oracles of God and you shall become as another one—as the Prophetess of God!" (ML #111:22.) We know by the wonderful fruit of Dad and Mama's ministry, the billions reached with the Gospel and the millions of souls saved through the Family, that they are called and chosen of God.

       All the successful moves of God throughout time and the Bible were led by God's chosen man for that time and purpose. Read your Bible and Church history and you'll see this always has been true (ML #161:40).

       If you think you can be a part of God's mighty movement without following its leadership—His chosen leadership—you are mistaken! (ML #155:31.)

       When I'm gone, [Maria] will inherit that power and that mantle and she will be the channel. So don't think that my death is going to kill the movement! But you are going to do better than ever, do you understand? Because you're still going to have the same spiritual leadership that you had before: Jesus Christ and dear little Maria (ML #706:62,70,71).

C. Believe and teach the Family's fundamental beliefs, both Biblical and revealed, as published in our "Statement of Faith," or otherwise declared as such in a publication with a ML number.

       The Lord, through the Bible, Dad, Mama and Peter, has poured forth an immense amount of teaching, training, guidance, spiritual truths, revelations and direction. The Bible and the Letters embody our religious beliefs and doctrine. These beliefs vary in importance, but some are an integral and essential part of our faith, which as Charter Members we must believe and teach.

       Our "Statement of Faith" articulates most of the Family's fundamental beliefs, as it includes the following subjects: The Scriptures, God, Creation, the fall of man, Jesus Christ the Son of God, the way of salvation, the Holy Spirit, the baptism of the Holy Spirit, the gifts of the Spirit, the fruits of the Spirit, angels, spirits, departed saints, Satan, demons, spiritual warfare, prayer, divine healing, the fellowship of believers, the Lord's Supper, the Church, the Great Commission, consecration, separation from the World, persecution for righteousness' sake, discipleship, cooperative communal living, children, the sanctity of life, civil government and religious liberty, as well as a personal belief in Bible prophecy indicating that we are living in the Endtime.

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       We also have other beliefs that are explained in published MLs, which we consider to be fundamental and essential, that are not included in the "Statement of Faith," such as the Law of Love. (The Law of Love is further defined in point F of the Responsibili ties of Individual Members, and referred to in other places throughout the Charter.) Also, the use of prophecy as one of the means to determine the Lord's will. (For more on prophecy see Prophecy Rules.)

       Obviously not every Letter or publication from World Services contains fundamental or essential beliefs. There are over 3,000 Letters that have now been published on a myriad of subjects. Contained within them is a wide variety of teaching and revelations, of dreams and spiritual experiences, of advice and counsel on both spiritual and practical matters. Some of this is fundamental and essential to our belief system and some is not.

       For example, salvation by grace, eternal salvation, prophecy and a belief in spiritual warfare, angels and departed saints are all essential Family beliefs. You can't be a Charter Member unless you believe these truths. The same holds true with such doctrines as Creation as God outlined it in Genesis, that Jesus is the Son of God, etc.

       There are, howe ver, times when Dad has made statements in the Letters to the effect of, "This is what I feel about this subject, but you don't have to believe it if you don't want to." In such a case, what Dad has said would be part of the totality of our beliefs, but it would not be considered an essential one. Another example of a non-essential belief would be the "Trailer Series" ("Have Trailer, Will Travel!") which Dad wrote some years ago, in which he expounded on living in trailers or caravans. Those Let ters are part of our beliefs but are not considered to be fundamental or essential.

       As Charter Members, we are expected to believe and teach the Family's fundamental and essential beliefs. As mentioned earlier, most of these are compiled in the "Statement of Faith" for your reference. This is not to say that the "Statement of Faith" supersedes the Letters; it's just that, at the present time it is the only publication that contains a comprehensive list of almost all of our fundamental beliefs.

       Our other Family Statements also contain a great deal of description on all facets of our Family life and beliefs, but the "Statement of Faith" deals specifically with our basic beliefs. Of course, these fundamental beliefs are more completely expounded upon in the Letters, and this is where you should go in order to gain a more thorough understanding of them.

       In the future, when the Lord gives something new to Mama and Peter, which is to become a fundamental Family belief, it will be offic ially stated as such and published in a GN or publication bearing a Letter number.

       If you want to know what the Lord has revealed to us on how to run His Revolution, you've got to read the MO Letters! … You've got to listen to what He's told us to do and how to do it (ML #161:38).

       The inspired and the revelatory [MO Letters] are still true and as helpful as ever, just as when God gave them, but the long diatribes and lengthy business Letters on the endless details of the affairs of the mom ent ... are soon out of date and no longer appropriate (ML #311B:10).

       I think we all heartily agree on all the fundamentals and all the major doctrines and the things that are really essential. So we don't need to split theological hairs over some of these little things that I say, "Well, it may be, it may not be, I can't prove it. It's my opinion, my private interpretation, you don't have to believe it!" But what the Scripture says, that's it! You'd better agree with this! (ML #2234:27).

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D. Live in accordance with the Word by endeavoring to apply the spiritual and practical counsel given in the Letters to their daily lives.

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       Not every Letter is designated by WS to be a fundamental or essential belief, meaning that if you don't believe and practice it, you will lose your Charter membership. Every Letter does, however, contain spiritual or practical guidance, counsel and instruction, which as Charter Members you are expected to conscientiously apply to your life and Home.

       Of course, there are certain older Letters and publications that don't apply as much today as they did when they were written years ago, as some of our methods and means of accomplishing our job of reaching the world with the Gospel have changed over the years. The Letters, however, contain God's counsel for the Family, and as Family members we should do our best to please God by following the preponderance of the guidance He's given in His Word. (See also Word Rules, B.)

E. Read the Bible, the Letters, and other Family publications, both old and new.

       God's Word says, "faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God" (Romans 10:17). In order to strengthen our faith, and to be in tune with the Lord and the directions that He is giving the Family, it is imperative that we read and study His Word, both the Bible and the Letters and other WS publications, for they contain a wealth of needed counsel, direction and spiritual feeding.

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       For this reas on it is required that members spend a minimum of 1½ hour daily (or 10½ hours weekly) in communion with the Lord through the reading of His Word and other WS publications (privately or unitedly), prayer or and hearing from the Lord in prophecy. New disciples under one year in the Family must spend an additional 1 hour per day in the Word, or 17½ hours weekly total, in order to complete the reading and studying of the full foundation course for new disciples, as well as to complete their basic me mory work. (See Word Rules, A.)

       So that's the secret—the Word!—The secret of power and victory and overcoming and fruitfulness and fire and life and warmth and light and leadership, everything, is the Word! (ML #1089:63.)

       Some people need the Bible and some people need MO, and frankly, I think the Family needs both! (ML #1691:11.)

F. Endeavor to live by the principles of the Law of Love: To love and care for, and interact lovingly and harmoniously with all members of the Home in which they reside and with Family members at large.

       Dad succinctly explained the Law of Love in the following quote.

       "'Love doeth thy neighbor no harm,' for 'thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself': This is God's Law of Love! 'Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.' 'Against such love there is no law.' This is the Lord's Law of Love. Obey it and you can have total love, life and liberty in the Lord. These are God's conditions. (Romans 13:10; Matthew 22:39; Matthew 7:12; Galatians 5 :22,23.)" (ML #302C:8; DB1.)

       Many have the idea that the Law of Love concerns only sexual matters.—This is not so, as the Law of Love governs all of our actions and is the basis for all of our Family rules, rights and responsibilities.

       This clause in the Charter is one of the most important, as it sets the tone for all that is to follow. The Charter grants a number of rights for our members in order to allow them to operate according to their faith. It also gives each individual much more authority over what happens in their Home. But the reason for giving these rights is not to create a "me first" attitude, where we put our "rights" above all other concerns. Unselfish love, the love that puts the needs of others before our own, the great love that lays down its life for others, the Love of God in our hearts, that is the heart and soul of this Charter. Without love, it is just a listing of rules, regulations and laws.

       If we implement the Charter without love, the end result co uld be an organization with members who are looking out mainly for themselves. If it is implemented with the main ingredient being the Love of God, it will result in a stronger Family, with wise, loving and full-of-faith brothers and sisters.

       The implementation of the Charter is going to be a test of our spiritual maturity. Daily we will be faced with situations in which we will have to decide if we are going to put our individual wants and desires above the needs of others. It will measure ou r prayerfulness, our unselfishness and our love for others.

       When we find ourselves voting on matters within the Home, we must vote according to what we believe is God's will, and what is the loving and Godly thing to do. Remember the Law of Love: "Love doeth thy neighbor no harm." With the Charter, we are each responsible to live the Law of Love. "By this shall all men know that you are My disciples, if you have love one to another" (John 13:35).

       "Whatsoever you do in word or in deed, do a ll to the glory of God!" That's our rule, God's rule. What are the greatest commandments? "Love God with all your heart, love your neighbor as yourself!" (ML #292:29.)

       Love is the stricter law in the long run because it really goes further than anything else does. The Old Law was only obeyed because they had to and they were made to and they would only do as much as they were made to do, whereas love goes all the way! It'll go to the death and die for someone else to do the right thing (ML #17 05:25).

G. Engage in evangelism.

       The Lord has called all Christians to partake in the Great Commission: "Go ye into all the World and preach the Gospel to every creature" (Mark 16:15). We have answered that call, and as such, we have a commitment to win others to Jesus by dedicating ourselves to the goal of preaching the Gospel to every creature.

       The definition of evangelism is "zealous preaching and dissemination of the Gospel, such as through missionary work." We felt this was the appro priate way to express the concept of both witnessing to the unsaved and follow-up feeding, which includes teaching the Word to those who are saved. We considered wording this point, "Regularly engages in witnessing," but if you were in a situation where you had so many sheep that were already saved and you were teaching them regular classes, you might not consider that "witnessing," but it would be considered evangelism. The main point is that we must all be working to "preach the Gospel to ever y creature."

       If the Revolution is anything at all, it is a soul-winning, disciple-winning revolution or it is nothing at all!... The Revolution was born in the white-hot fires of a soul winning ... and a disciple-gaining movement! (ML #328B:79.)

       Unless you witness, I don't believe you love your fellow man! If you don't love your fellow man, I don't believe you love God (ML #2531:2).

H. Live in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights," and the "Fundamental Family Rule s," which are determined, defined, and published by World Services.

       The "Fundamental Family Rules" is a separate section at the end of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights." Within it are both behavioral and procedural rules, which Charter Family members are expected to follow. Charter Members who violate these rules will be disciplined according to the severity of the infractions of these rules.

       There are approximately 100 behavioral rules, which cover all major aspects of our lives, including prophecy, finances, outreach, sex and affection, food and drink, get-out, driving, health and hygiene, marriage and separation, home life, scholastics, schedules and excommunication, as well as required meetings and activities.

       Prior to this Charter there were over 600 "Family rules" loosely outlined in the Letters and other pubs! Although these former "Family rules" no longer constitute rules which members can lose their Charter Member status for breaking, they are still very good guidelines for our lives that will help us to do a better job for the Lord. Some of them your Home may decide to implement as Home regulations.

       In choosing the rules that were included in the "Fundamental Family Rules" we prayerfully chose those which we felt were the most important for the Family. After selecting them, we consulted with Family members from all walks of Family life to ensure that these rules would be practical and workable. We pray that you will find them so.

       Human beings simply need rules as guidelines to help them do a good job and work in unity with each other and accomplish what they need to do (ML #2857:43).

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I. Reside in a Charter Home and appear on a Home's monthly report each month. (See World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules, A., as well as Right of Mobility, A. 7.)

J. Share their material belongings with the Family in general, and with the Home where they reside in particular, according to Acts 2:44-45, and be good stewards of all Fam ily materials.

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1. While 16- and 17-year-olds are not held responsible for the Home's financial decisions and obligations, they are still required to live according to Acts 2:44-45 when it comes to funds they raise either through outreach or secular employment or donations they receive.

       Our Family believes in Acts 2:44-45, which says, "And all that believed were together, and had all things common; and sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need." This is an essential verse in our Family way of life, as it governs the use and ownership of our material possessions. The goal of these verses and of their companion verses, Acts 4:34-35, is that everyone has what he or she needs, and that those who have more than they need should lovingly share it with those who lack.

       As disciples and Charter Members, we share our material belongings with one another so that we will all have the things that we need and that no one will be in want. In some cases the word "share" would mean to "give"; in other cases it would mean to "make available for others to use."

       The area of material possessions can be a real test of our love, unselfishness and faithfulness. Do we have enough love to supply the needs of others by the giving of those things we have to fill their need? Are we unselfish enough to give even though it hurts, or conversely to refuse to receive an item because we know the giver needs it more than ourselves? Are we faithful ste wards of the things we use?

       Whatever material possessions you or the Home have, they ultimately belong to the Lord and it is your responsibility to take good care of them, to be a faithful steward of them. When you have need of something and someone shares it with you, whether by allowing you to use it, or by giving it to you, it is your responsibility to take good care of it.

       At times, questions will arise concerning to whom some item actually belongs. This will most often occur when someon e is moving from a Home and wishes to take an item with them. In such cases the Home should decide the matter by a simple majority vote, unless the items were previously agreed upon when the member joined the Home (see the Right of Mobility, D. 7.). Generally, with major items, the Home should consider what is best for the overall work.

       We are expected to be good stewards over not only the Family's materials but also those things that are entrusted to our care by outsiders, such as rented hous ing, properties and other materials belonging to non-Family members.

       We are doing what the Lord wanted the Church to do in the first place, and which the Church did in the first place, in the days of the Early Church where they lived communally and "no man called anything his own" (Acts 4:32) and "owed no man anything save to love him" (Romans 13:8) and shared all things, just as it says in Acts 2.—They really lived communally and it worked, like it's working with us, because of the Lord an d our love and sacrificial service and wanting to help others and help each other (ML #2342:25).

       Let's be more faithful stewards and diligent caretakers of the materials, resources, properties, provisions, vehicles, etc., which the Lord gives or loans to us for His use!... Let's take much better care of what God has already given us so He will be able to trust us with more, so we can do a better and bigger job in the future! (ML #197:23).

K. Endeavor to fulfill the Scriptural injunction to "bear one another's burdens"—to put the needs of the Home and its members before their own.

       God's Word instructs us, "Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ" (Galatians 6:2). This is another Law of Love clause. As Jesus laid down His life for us, so we should lay down our lives daily for the brethren. As disciples, we should manifest our love one for another by doing all we can to make sure that we are aware of the physical, spiritual and emotional needs of those arou nd us, and we should do whatever we can to help care for them in their need. Since so much within the Home will be decided by the Home's voting members, it will become even more important that we all are mindful of the burdens, hardships, battles and needs of others in the Home. And that we are willing to put their needs and the good of the Home before our own wants and desires.

       When prayerfully deciding how to vote on a matter within the Home, you will need to take into consideration everyone in the Home. You should ask yourself how the new idea is going to affect others—the children, the parents, the single moms and dads.

       I always try to put myself in the other fellow's shoes, and not expect any more of him than I would expect of myself, and not ask any more of him than I would want him to ask of me, were our positions reversed! (ML #52:47.)

L. Bear, with all other voting members of the Home, the spiritual, physical, material, educational and financial responsibilities of t he Home in which they reside.

       Voting members have a great deal of authority in their Home through their right to vote. Throughout the Charter you'll find that there are many issues which the Home is required to democratically vote on in order to decide their course of action. Because each voting member has the right to participate in deciding these matters, they are responsible for the results of their vote. So when a Home is doing poorly, either spiritually, physically or economically, the bl ame will fall on the voting members of the Home, instead of solely on the Home teamwork, because the policies of the Home are determined by the voting members and not only the Home teamwork.

       Our 16- and 17-year-olds are voting members of the Home and thus they too are equally responsible for the decisions of the Home and the outcome of those decisions. Only in the area of financial decisions is there a difference in the voting rights. Those 16 and 17 will not have a vote on the financial matte rs of the Home, but neither will they be held responsible for the Home's debts and liabilities. (For more on this see Rights of the Individual: Within the Home, B. and 1. a).)

       Even though our members under the age of 16 and new disciples are not voting members, you are encouraged to seek their opinions and participation in Home matters that concern them.

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       Whenever practical, our junior teens should be permitted to attend Home council meetings covering matters pertaining to them. However, new disciples should not be invited to Home council meetings until they have been in the Family for six months.

       Once a united decision has been made ... in prayer and open discussion, etc., then a majority united decision is made, ... then they certainly should stick to it without complaint (ML #962:79).

M. Participate in the governing of the Home, in which they reside; accept responsibility for the collective decisions and actions of that Home, and for the results of those decis ions and actions.

       It is very important for everyone to fully understand that the Home in which they live belongs to all who live in it, and all voting members are expected to participate in its decision-making process. Your Home teamwork is only a fraction of the membership of your Home, and as such, your Home does not belong to them; nor does your Home belong to the area or continental office; it's yours. As such, it is up to you to help govern your Home and make the decisions that affect it.

       As Dad once admonished the Family's leadership, "I don't see how we can have a bossy, dictatorial, tough kind of attitude over other Homes and their affairs, when you're supposed to be independent and indigenous, a fellowship of the Spirit, merely melted together in love and not just frozen together in formality!

       "We must get the idea through our thick skulls that each Home is [to be] totally supporting and governing itself locally and owes us nothing except the loyalty of love and the same Spirit, and are bound together only by these and a common doctrine, vision, message and method, history and the Lord's leadership.

       "Not one of them has to do what we say. They're like grown, married children on their own, who should listen to fatherly counsel and perhaps heed it if they are wise—but we can't force them to!

       "However, if we have trained them up in the way they should go, now that they are old, they will not depart therefrom! Neither would they want to depart from the fello wship of the Family, nor disgrace its name! Nor will their Father's advice and counsel go unheeded! Neither will they want to cease communicating with the rest of the Family!—And they will help one another when needed!—And they will value the aids we send them, the lessons, Letters, literature, etc., and follow their instructions or advice because they know we love them and are only trying to help them. But we cannot force them to! They will cooperate because it's to their advantage and they k now that in unity there is greater strength and wisdom, and they enjoy the fellowship and mutual help. Voluntary, not forced!" (ML #156C:8,9,10,11; DB5.)

       Because you personally have the ability to participate, through voting, in virtually all decisions governing all aspects of your Home, you—collectively with all other voting members of the Home—bear responsibility for the outcome of those decisions. If the Home collectively agrees to pursue some course of action and it later goes awry, th en it is the Home's fault, and each voting member of the Home is to blame. If things go so bad that the Home has to be disciplined, all of the Home members will be disciplined, not just the teamwork. If the Home is mismanaged or becomes spiritually dead, then every person age 16 and over is responsible, because they had a say in the decisions and resultant problems.

       You have the right to participate in the governing of your Home, but you also bear the responsibility for those decisions. It's b ecause of the responsibility that you should feel obligated to participate in the decision-making process in the Home. Each of you needs to be involved, to pray about the matters being brought up and cast your vote, and not just let others make the decisions, because you are going to be held responsible. If you just rock along and don't pay attention to or pray about the matter being voted on, you may find your Home reaping the results of unprayerful or unwise decisions.

       It's God's business, thank the Lord, but it is business ! There's a lot to be dealt with in such an operation.—I don't have the wisdom, you don't have the wisdom, none of us alone has the wisdom to take care of all that. Decisions must be made in counsel, first of all with the Lord, and then together and in agreement on all major decisions (ML #301A:5).

N. Live in accordance with the agreed-upon "Home regulations" of the Home in which they continue to reside.

       Since you will have an equal vote with all other m embers of your Home, and you will be participating in the governing of the Home through your vote, you are expected to abide by all joint decisions made by the voting members of the Home. Once your Home has voted on a matter, then you must comply with the decision made, even if you voted against it, because the majority of the voting members agreed to it.

       If you strongly disagree with the other voting members of your Home on a matter, you are free to move out of the Home in accordance with the terms of the Right of Mobility. Remember, though, that any Home you live in will probably not always vote on matters to your satisfaction, so you shouldn't decide to move out of your Home every time something doesn't go your way. Moving to another Home may be a fairly easy matter, as you will see in the Right of Mobility section of the Charter; but as long as you are in a particular Home, you must live in accordance with the decisions made in that Home.

       Freedom costs something. With freedom you take on the responsibility of making your own decisions and taking the consequences (ML #985:6).

       If you have given your point of view and a decision is made which is contrary to the way you think things ought to be done, then the best thing is to be quiet! If you think they're wrong, then you can pray that they'll realize it and they'll change or they'll change their mind or something will happen that will change things (ML #1935:10).

O. Commit their resources, time, energy, knowledge, gifts and talents towards reaching the agreed-upon goals of the Home in which they reside and the goals of the Family at large.

       The voting members determine their Home's basic nature, goals and direction by a two-thirds majority. If, for example, you collectively decide that your Home is going to major on a "Consider the Poor" ministry, such as ministering to juvenile delinquents, then all of you are expected to contribute your all—your gifts, talents, energy, etc.—to achieve that goal, wit hin your capabilities and health. If you don't agree with the goals of the Home, and therefore don't want to participate in reaching that goal, you will be expected to move elsewhere.

       God always seems to bless harmony, people living at peace with each other and loving each other and helping each other and showing a large measure of love (ML #530:43).

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P. Grant the use of their intellectual property, such as songs, written works, etc., to the Family, or a company endorsed by Worl d Services.

       In order to be able to distribute our tapes and videos through commercial means, such as mass marketing, TV broadcasting, sales in retail stores, the companies that own the rights to the finished products must also own the copyrights to or have licenses to use all of the songs on the tape or video.

       WS is endeavoring to make it possible for Family Homes to commercially market our Family tools on a larger scale in order to get out more message and benefit from them financially. How ever, before this is possible, the companies set up for this purpose must have written agreements with the authors/composers of the songs for the material to be used for commercial purposes. To ensure that each of our new tools is legally suitable for commercial distribution, we're now requiring that before a song is recorded in a Family studio, the paperwork be in order granting a Family or a WS endorsed company the right to use the song commercially. The individual author or composer would kee p the copyright itself, but just give the WS-endorsed company the right to freely use the song in Family productions.

       The same applies to written works that are produced for GP distribution. For example, those who send in spirit stories or other written works which are slotted for a GP pub will be sent a contract to fill in granting a company named by World Services the rights to use that written work in a commercial product.

       Thank you for your cooperation in granting these companies the use of your songs or written works, which then make it possible for you and the whole Family to benefit from them via the finished product!

Q. Perform, to the best of their ability, the duties and responsibilities assigned to them by the Home's duly elected officers.

       The voting members of a Home elect the Home teamwork with the understanding that the teamwork is commissioned to manage and spiritually shepherd the Home within the authorized boundaries of this Charter. This includes carrying out matters that the majority of the Home agrees to. Home members are therefore expected to perform the duties that are assigned to them by the Home officers they have elected.

       Do you have a job?... Are you treating it like God's job, and doing it as faithfully as the Lord would expect you to do it? (ML #2522:60.)

       Let's carry the burden of our responsibilities bravely, courageously, cheerfully and thankfully, and not be heard to grumble, groan and gripe! (ML #197:25.)

R. Cooperate with and support the joint decisions of the Home's voting members, or if in disagreement, or unable to cooperate for any other reason, voluntarily remove themselves from the Home by moving to another Home or pioneering their own Home.

       The voting members of the Home determine the way the Home operates, what the Home's ministries will be, etc., and the members of the Home are expected to comply with those decisions and to support them.

       For example, if the majority of the Home votes to send out witness ing teams five times a week, and you had only wanted teams to go out three times, you should still support the decision voted on by the Home and cooperate in trying to get witnessing teams out five times per week.

       If for some reason you can't agree to the decision and you consider it to be a major enough matter that you don't feel that you can cooperate with it or support it, then you should voluntarily decide to move to another Home or pioneer your own Home. Of course there will be numerous t imes when the Home does not vote the way you do, but in most cases those will be on minor issues, and we expect that you probably won't feel that you need to leave the Home.

       You will note the clause, "or unable to cooperate for any other reason." There may be other reasons you are not able to cooperate with or support a decision. For example, if you were confined to a wheelchair and your Home decided to become a road team Home, in which case you felt it wouldn't be practical for you to remain a part of that Home. Rather than ask the Home not to follow their vision however, you feel the wise and loving thing to do would be to find a more suitable Home, in accordance with the Right of Mobility.

       As long as you remain in a Colony, you are still under the authority of its leaders to keep the Colony rules, unless you want to leave! (ML #173:6.)

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S. Endeavor to conduct themselves as good Christians, showing outgoing love and concern for others and fulfilling their obligatio ns, legal and otherwise to them.

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       An important part of showing love and concern for others, whether in the Family or not, is to fulfill your obligations, legally, morally or otherwise, to them. For example, if someone lends you his or her vehicle, your duty as a good Christian is to return the vehicle in the condition in which it was lent to you. Or if you borrow an expensive piece of equipment from someone and break it, the loving thing to do would be to get it fixed or replace it before returning it to them. Another example of fulfilling your obligations to others would be if you were to sell your car to another Family member. Your obligation to them would be to ensure that they receive the title to the car, and that all other necessary paperwork is in order. Being faithful in business dealings with others—whether Family members or not—is an important part of your sample as a good Christian.

T. Refrain from activities or behavior that would be a reproach to the cau se of Christ and/or reflect negatively on the Family.

       Each of us should be a good example of a Christian and of a Family member, for our sample speaks much louder than our sermon. As much as possible, our actions should lift up Jesus, and none of them should defame or blemish either the Lord or the Family.

       In different areas of the world, this could mean refraining from different things. Wherever we live, we must take into account the traditions and culture of the community or country and tr y not to do things that would offend individuals of that culture. This is part of trying to comply with the Biblical counsel to "become all things to all men" (1 Corinthians 9:22).

       There is, of course, a great deal of counsel in the Letters regarding our sample and actions, which applies no matter where we live.

       Help us, Lord, to be a good sample of You and Your Love. Help us, Lord, to understand them enough, and their religion and their customs and their ways, so that we shall be aware of the differences which might cause friction or difficulty in things we do or say, so we will not offend them in any way (ML #631:146).

U. Endeavor to overcome, and when necessary request united prayer against, those personal weaknesses and besetting sins that cause physical or spiritual disruption in the Home, and/or physical, spiritual or emotional harm to themselves or others.

       Charter Members are expected to work on their personal weaknesses and NWOs, as if these get out of hand, they cou ld eventually result in an individual causing problems for themselves and/or the Home, which, if long-lasting or serious enough, could eventually warrant moving them to Fellow Member status.

       However, if one's personal weaknesses are such that they do not cause spiritual or physical disruption of the Home, nor spiritual, physical or emotional harm to themselves or others, it is not mandatory that they overcome them to retain their Charter membership; though they are expected to try to overcome them, and they may receive some counsel on the matter from their Home teamwork.

       For example, if you have a problem with pride, and it's your besetting sin, but you are aware of it and are continually trying to keep it in check, and it's not causing major problems in the Home or even to yourself, then you aren't in danger of losing your Charter Member status. If, however, because of your pride, you are causing problems in the Home, the teamwork may talk with you about it and offer some advice t o help you overcome it. If you refuse their advice, or you don't seriously attempt to overcome it, you could end up eventually losing your place in the Charter Family.

       We occasionally have serious spiritual problems that become of sufficient magnitude to seriously hinder our relationship with the Lord or with others.—In which case, we need to actually be delivered from them, and thank the Lord, we can be delivered!... We can—and should—make progress and show some improvement even in the w eak areas of our lives as we walk with the Lord and continue to grow spiritually. In fact, if we don't try to make progress and grow and continually strive to overcome such weaknesses, but we just resign ourselves to them and sort of give up in our struggle against them, we may find that they move from the category of being mere human frailties to the category of being serious spiritual problems! (ML #2553:35,36.)

V. Recognize that their body is the temple of the Holy Ghost, and as such, do n ot abuse it in any way. Keep a clean and presentable appearance, and actively and regularly endeavor to stay healthy and physically fit.

       The Bible says, "Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's. Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwells in you? If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are" (1 Corinthians 6:19-20; 3:16-17).

       As Dad has clearly explained in numerous Letters, the Lord made man to need physical activity and fresh air in order to remain healthy. Maybe what the Lord meant when He said that he that defiles the temple of God, our body, "him shall God destroy," is that they will be destroyed with illness as a result of their negligence.

       As witnessing Christians, our appearance is part of ou r testimony, so we must endeavor (which means to make an earnest attempt) to stay healthy and physically fit. The Get-Out Rules are clearly explained in the "Fundamental Family Rules". We must also keep a clean and presentable appearance, which is compatible with the country and culture in which we live.

       You need to maintain healthy habits: A good diet eating the right kind of foods, be sure you get plenty of rest, and then, of course, get lots of good exercise, which most of you probably ge t because you've got lots of work to do. Always try to get out some each day in the fresh air and sunshine. And then, live right. In other words, keep at peace with the Lord and obey His natural and spiritual laws (ML #353:2).

       Straighten up! Trim up, dress up, and behave like the good Christian missionaries you're supposed to be (ML #1202:63).

W. Have a working knowledge of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       As the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules" define our responsibilities, our rights, and the rules that we must follow to be Charter Members, obviously each of us should have a basic working knowledge of these documents. This doesn't mean that you need to become an expert on the intricacies of the Charter, but neither will you be able to claim ignorance of the law if you fail to obey it. We have endeavored to compile and clearly explain in this book all of your responsibilities and rights, as well as the rules, and having d one so, it is now your responsibility to familiarize yourself with them.

       They have to become their own judges now. "What do you think about this? You know the facts, you know the truth, you know the law, you know the rules" (ML #1399:9).

       This ends the section outlining the "Responsibilities of Individual Members." Those who fulfill these responsibilities consequently have certain rights as Charter Members.

       Actually, when reading your rights, it would be wise to remind yourself that you have these rights only if you are fulfilling your responsibilities. It's a two-way street; you must act as a Charter Member in order to have the rights of a Charter Member.

2. BASIC RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

       Charter Members have the right to:

A. Individual choice and self-determination. God endows each Charter Member with gifts and talents, which, along with their experiences, education and training—physically, intellectually and spiritually—help to compose the unique person they are. Each individual has the right to exercise his personal initiative, faith and choice in the use of his gifts, talents, education and experience, providing these are cons istent with the goals of the overall Family and the "Fundamental Family Rules," and with the agreed-upon goals and Home regulations of the Home in which they reside. If they determine that they cannot exercise these rights in their present circumstances, they have the right to attempt to change their circumstances through their Home council meetings, through the election of the Home's officers, through moving to another Home or the pioneering of their own Home.

       The term "individual choice" is used to stress that each and every Charter Member of voting age has just that—the right to choose the things he or she wants to do. Of course, if you choose to do things that are not in agreement with what the Family is all about, then you may be in jeopardy of losing your membership, or if you wish, you can choose to leave the Family.

       The definition of self-determination is: "Determination of one's own fate or course of action without compulsion." This is included to ensure you the right to make personal choices without anyone compelling you to do something you don't want to do. The definitions of compel are: "To force, drive, or constrain; to necessitate or pressure by force; to exert a strong, irresistible force on." As Dad said, "We have to choose for ourselves, find His will for ourselves, seek Him diligently to know His will, and to know what is best for us and others through our knowledge of His Word and personal experience. This is why He put us here, this is what we're here to learn, and the major part of our training: How to make the right decisions through our personal contact with Him, our knowledge of His Word and His will, and our love for Him and others" (ML #238:9).

       Throughout the Letters, Dad and Mama have said that each individual should determine his own course of action without anyone pressuring, forcing, or exerting strong, irresistible force on him to do something he doesn't want to do. We trust that you love the Lord enough and are spiritually matu re enough to make the right decisions through prayer, His Word and Godly counsel. The only One Who should compel or constrain us to do anything is Jesus. "For the Love of Christ constraineth us" (2 Corinthians 5:14). His Word and your love for Him are what should motivate you to do the right things, not because someone is making you do them, but because you choose to out of love. If you must be forced to obey and follow the Lord rather than obey Him because you love Him, then you're not a very s trong disciple.

       This doesn't mean that you should now "do your own thing" and act however you want without any concern for others or the Family. If you wish to remain a Charter Member, you must operate within the boundaries of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules." And as long as you do, you are free to follow the Lord as you feel led, without anyone forcing you to do anything you don't feel is God's will for you.

       You have the right to exercise your personal initiative and faith and to be in a Home where you are best able to do so. If not, you have the right to try to change the situation through your voting power, or move to a different Home, or pioneer your own Home with those who are like-minded; or if you feel you have no place in the Family, you are free to leave if you choose.

       The most successful [movements] were those who allowed the greatest liberty, difference of opinion, individual initiative and ingenuity and indigenuity—who put the people on their own as much as possible (MOP 33:47).

       You are expected to make your own decisions within the boundaries of these guidelines, on your own, and with the Lord's help, and only refer it to your leaders if it's something they have to decide, and that you're not allowed to decide, because if you don't start learning how to make decisions now for at least yourself, you'll never be a leader.—And we need leaders, not robots or slaves! (ML #127:14.)

B. Determine by prayer, di scussion, debate and voting, the basic nature, goals, direction and activities of the Home, providing they are consistent with the goals of the continental area in which they reside, and of the overall Family.

       You have the right to help decide the direction, the goals and the basic nature of your Home, and the activities that your Home undertakes to meet those goals. You have the right to pray, discuss with others, and debate any issues in your Home council meetings before voting on a course o f action.

       Under the Election Rules, which are found in the "Fundamental Family Rules", unless specified otherwise, when a vote is taken on any matter, the majority rules. So if over 50% of the Home's voting members agree with something, then it is passed. This means that if there is a tie vote then the measure is not passed. There are some matters that require two-thirds of the voting members' agreement before passage, including all financial matters, certain personnel changes, and disciplinar y matters.

       All decisions of any kind should never be dictated by one person, without agreement by other leaders and/or the rest of the body, as seems necessary. ... Any decisions made on the part of any individuals without such due consultation and agreement could be considered null and void, because others affected were not consulted nor conferred with. This is the way we personally have always operated even within our own tiny personal family. (ML #210:40.)

       One portion of this clause s tates, "providing they are consistent with the goals of the continental area in which they reside." Later it will be explained about continental area goals and how these are determined. (See Basic Responsibilities of the Charter Home, E., and Election Rules, D.) In brief, Homes will have the opportunity to vote on, and confirm every six months, individual continental area goals. But once such goals are agreed upon and enacted, then the Homes in the area must abide by them. Obviously, another ver y important stipulation of Home decisions is that they must also "be consistent with the goals of the overall Family," that is, those stated in the Charter itself or specifically announced as such by World Services (see Basic Responsibilities of the Charter Home, E. 1. a.).

C. Make the decision on medical matters involving themselves or their children.

       We believe that divine healing is a privilege available to all who believe in Jesus. The decision to avail yourself of that privilege is a p ersonal matter between you and God. Generally it is recommended to trust the Lord for your healing, but we understand that the Lord works in each of our lives in different ways, and in some cases He may want someone to get the help of a doctor. When it comes to healing, the decision whether to trust God completely for healing or to seek medical help is up to you. "According to your faith be it unto you" (Matthew 9:29). Dad said, "God wants you to make your own choice by faith according to your o wn faith—not mine, not ours, not somebody else's, but yours!" (ML #M:45.)

       The first step when someone is sick would be to seek prayer from the Home. As the Bible says, "Is any sick among you? Let him call for the elders of the church and let them pray over him" (James 5:14).

       If the illness is such that you might wish to seek medical attention, it is advisable to pray with and seek counsel from the Home teamwork. In more serious cases where grave medical decisions must be made, we suggest th at the Home pray and hear from the Lord in prophecy for the person. Receiving such prophecies can provide wonderful guidance and great comfort and assurance for the sick one. Sometimes prophecies can be rather mysterious, but because they are words given by the One Who knows our innermost heart and needs, specifically for the one with sickness, the interpretation of the prophecies and final course of action must be determined by the sick individual. Because healing is a personal matter, the sick one must make the final medical decisions based on his or her personal faith. (See also Prophecy Rules, C.) The other members of the Home should continue to encourage and help the sick member no matter what decision they make, even if the others feel it's the wrong one.

       If you are a parent with children in the Family, the medical decisions regarding your under-age children are your responsibility to make and they should be made in your child's best interests. (See Rights of Parents, G.)

       The re are some legal factors to consider when making medical decisions for your children. This includes the ages when children can make their own medical decisions. As far as the Family is concerned, those who have reached the age of 16 are eligible to make their own medical decisions in countries where this is legal.

       Of course in an emergency, if an adult is unconscious, or otherwise incapacitated, then the husband or wife, or in the case of a single the Home teamwork, is responsible to pray and make whatever medical decisions are necessary to help the individual. If it is a child, it is the parents or legal guardians who have the responsibility to decide what should be done.

       As for just trusting God, you've either got the faith or you haven't!—You don't try to work it up!—You just know if you haven't got that kind of supernatural miraculous faith, ... you'd better beat it to the nearest hospital and doctor and feel no condemnation about it! (ML #330C:51.)

       The parents themselves must make their own [medical] decisions under the counsel and guidance of their own local shepherd ... with the help of the local System's own medical services, immediately and on the spot (ML #330B:29).

D. Privately communicate, without hindrance, directly via mail with Maria and Peter, World Services and all officers above the Home's officers in their continental area, and to have the mailing address or addresses of these persons readily available to them.

       Every Home member has the righ t to be able to communicate with any or all leadership in their area above their Home teamwork, and directly with Mama and Peter or WS, if they so desire. An address for all of these shepherds must be readily available to them. If someone chooses to write to higher leadership, no one should try to stop or hinder them or demand to read the letter before it is sent. You have an open line of communication to leadership, so if you feel you need to write for any reason, you are free to do so. Each ar ea should provide a local address for you to write your continental or area office, and your letters to Mama or WS can be forwarded on by them. But if you would prefer, -you can write Mama or WS directly at World Services, Postfach 3624, 8021 Zurich, Switzerland, or at Mama's e-mail address, MPG@IBM.NET.

       Dad and I receive many personal letters from DO and TS members alike in which you pour out your hearts about your situation, or about questions you have. To us, each one of these letters is very precious, and your burdens become our burdens; your heartache becomes our heartache. ... Each of you is special to us! Please believe this. Don't ever doubt it. ... We appreciate your openness and honesty. We are thankful for your suggestions, for your questions and for your analyses of various situations. You're a vital part of our Family and we are interested in what you have to say.—Maria (ML #2931:1-2,4).

E. Remain in the Charter Family providing they conduct themselves as Charter M embers as outlined in the Responsibilities of Individual Members.

       If you are fulfilling the Responsibilities of Individual Members, and are keeping the "Fundamental Family Rules," you cannot be moved to Fellow Member status, nor be excommunicated, as you have the right to remain in the Charter Family.

F. Become a Fellow Member, providing they conduct themselves as Fellow Members as outlined in the Statement on Fellow Members.

       This publication clearly defines what Fellow Member status is, and what one has to do to qualify for and to remain a Fellow Member. Any Charter Member who wishes to move to Fellow Member status has the right to do so as long as they abide by the Fellow Member stipulations.

G. Depart from Charter or Fellow Member status and no longer be part of the Family at any time they desire, provided they are of legal age. Minors may only depart with parental permission.

       Anyone of legal age is free to leave the Family at any time they wish. No one is forced to rema in. In fact, if someone wants to go, then we want and encourage he or she to do so. We are not in the business of trying to coerce anyone to remain in the Family who desires otherwise; on the contrary, we are a Gideon's Band, and only those who want to be here should be.

       It's always been our personal policy, when we found someone wanted to leave, to simply ask them why, maybe answer any questions they might have or correct any misunderstandings which may be responsible, apologize for any of our mistakes which might have caused them to want to leave, but not to discourage them from leaving if they still want to (ML #140:11).

       If you do not agree with our doctrines, practices or leadership and wish to be free of our fellowship, you are welcome to leave at any time! (ML #173:5.)

       If one or more of your minor children decide that they no longer wish to be in the Family and live with you in a Charter Home, then you could try to help them get relocated with others who will provide ad equate care for them, such as with relatives if possible. Or, they can remain with you in a Charter Home providing they follow the stipulations outlined in Definition of a Charter Home , C. 3. If they are old enough to strike out on their own, you should assist them in getting set up in a proper situation outside a Family Home. If they choose, they may also remain in the Home temporarily, in order to make the transition as smooth as possible. Remember, they are still your and God's children, eve n though they may be wayward, so you should show them love, concern and care. (See ML #2942, "When Teens Leave the Family," GN 608.)

3. RIGHTS OF THE INDIVIDUAL: WITHIN THE HOME

Voting members have the right to:

A. Freely and regularly elect officers of the Home in which they reside, in accordance with the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       You have the right to elect your Home teamwork. Under the Election Rules section of the "Fundamental Family Rules" you'll find the explanation of what steps must be taken to elect the Home teamwork.

       In the past, Home teamwork elections were held every three months. Many have commented that it takes almost that much time for a teamwork to settle into the job and to work well together. So in order to make things more workable, Home elections will now be held every six months.

       Three months after each election there will be a vote of confirmation, at which time each Home will vote to confirm or not confirm their present teamwork for the second half of the six-month term of office. This is explained more fully in Election Rules, C.

       I suggested ... long ago that the local Colonies should choose their own shepherds when they are old enough and experienced enough and sufficiently established in the Lord and the work to do so. In other words, when the children had grown up, they should be fit and trusted to govern themselves (ML #328C:41).

       We want you to be able to choose your own Home teamwork, people you love and trust and respect as good shepherds, those who have courage to make the difficult decisions which shepherds need to make, who can encourage you to do your best for the Lord and His work, and who can correct you when you're not doing your best. These elections are not popularity contests, and you have a serious responsibility to desperately pray for the Lord to lead and guide you to choose those whom He wants to shepherd the Home. The elections should be accompanied by united prayer for the Lord's help and guidance (ML #2865:69).

B. Know the complete financial state of the Home in which they reside, including knowledge o f all of the Home's financial assets, liabilities, income, expenditures and debts.

       As financial matters are a very important part of the running of the Home, and can in many ways make or break a Home, it is imperative that all voting members of the Home, except those ages 16 and 17, be involved in the financial decisions. In order to make sound decisions, the voting members must know the complete state of the finances, so it is up to the teamwork to keep them informed of such.

       As you read th rough the Charter, you will notice that there are a number of financial matters that need to be decided upon through voting; and a two-thirds majority, instead of just a simple majority of 51%, determines all financial votes.

       Knowledge of the exact locations of Home funds and bank accounts is limited only to the Home teamwork and others they feel may need to know. It is the Home teamwork's responsibility to keep the Home's finances safe and secure. But the details of the exact amounts of asset s, liabilities, income, expenses and debts are to be made known to all voting members. (Although there will be a greater knowledge of Home finances within the Home, Home members should take care not to discuss such financial matters with outsiders, or where the Home's children can overhear.)

       Although 16- and 17-year-olds do not have a vote on financial matters, they still retain the right to know the state of the Home's finances. Likewise, they should still engage in the discussions regarding finances, and their views should be heard and considered.

       Throughout the Charter, there is quite a bit said about finances, and especially about debts. Unfortunately, sometimes a Home has debts, and when it does, this can cause problems, which must be solved. We have attempted to give guidelines by which to solve those problems; in doing so, it has meant having to write a great deal on the subject. The goal, though, is to keep your Home out of debt, and if you do, then many of the portions of the Charter concerning Home debts will not affect you.

       I want to reveal to the [members] the state of their finances: Where it goes and how it goes and so on! I want them to know everything they can possibly know about, due to the fact that it is their business, it is their money, it is being spent on them and their business and their work (ML #301A:24,46).

       Communication will help shift the burden of the finances off the shoulders of just a few people in the Home teamwork and onto the shou lders of all the mature members in the Home. This way everyone's faith and prayers can pull together to seek the Lord for the Home's needs. Everyone will be aware of the Home's financial needs and will be able to pray specifically and desperately! (ML #2813:21.)

1. All financial obligations belong to the Home as a whole, and the Home unitedly determines how to meet them. Should a member decide to move out of the Home, the member is personally accountable for, and must pay, their portion of th e Home's debts and/or liabilities. (Portion equals the amount of debts and liabilities divided by the number of voting members 18 years of age and older.)

a) 16- and 17-year-old members are exempt from all financial decisions and obligations.

       All financial decisions and obligations belong to the Home as a whole, and the voting members are collectively responsible to pay these obligations. The financial stability of the Home will be determined by how much the Lord blesses the Home, most like ly based on their prayers and obedience, and how wise they are in how they use the funds the Lord supplies. Homes which are praying for finances and are obedient to the Lord's leading will most likely do well. As Mama said, "Everyone can work in some way to help support the Home. ... Everyone can pray and search the Word for direction!" (ML #2929:43.) But how prayerful and obedient the Home is will be determined by the decisions of its voting members. If your Home has financial difficulties there will be no one to blame but yourselves, because the majority of the Home members will have made all the decisions, and unitedly you must all bear the responsibility of those decisions.

       Our Family policy has always been against being in debt. Dad has written a number of Letters about paying your creditors, those whom you owe money for rent, utilities or whatever. He has always advocated "cash and carry"—that you pay for what you buy, and if you don't have the money for it you don't buy it. D ad said, "If there's anything you need to learn, it's how to live on a businesslike basis.—Common sense, no credit, cash and carry. ... Live within your income day by day, or week by week or month by month. Don't spend money you haven't got" (ML #701:23,67).

       Generally our Homes have adhered to this practice and have paid their bills on time. Unfortunately, there have been times when Homes have gotten into debt. Usually these same Homes do not do so well spiritually or organizationally either, and often end up closing, and their members move on to other Homes. However, the last ones remaining in the Home have often been stuck with the unpaid bills. "Brethren, these things ought not so to be." So although it is against our general policy, debts do sometimes occur, and thus we must deal with the problem in this Charter.

       In order to enforce our policy of no debts, there have been some changes made on the TRF Report Form that clearly reflect whether your Home is in debt. If your Home reports being in debt for two consecutive months, the Home will automatically be put on Probationary Notice, which means your WS mailings will be stopped. So as you can see, not paying your bills on time, thus being in debt, will have serious consequences. Probationary Notice will be explained more fully in the Procedures for Placing a Home on Probationary Notice.

       For the purpose of this document, we will differentiate between being in debt and having liabilities. A debt is when you have a bill to pay and the payment is overdue. For example, if your telephone bill is due on a certain date, and you don't pay it by that date, then it becomes a debt, because it is the non-payment of a bill. If your rent is due on the first of the month, but you find that when the day comes to pay your rent you don't have the money, then you are in debt, because you have an unpaid bill that is past due.

       A liability is when you owe a certain amount of money that you promise to pay back over time, paying a certain amount at a given time each month. For example, perhaps your Home took out a Home loan of $1,000 with the agreement to repay it at $100 per month for ten months. Although you now owe $1,000, it is considered a liability, not a debt. You have agreed to pay your "bill" at the rate of $100 each month. However, if one month you do not pay your $100 bill, then the payment of that "bill" would be late, and that $100 would become a debt. The remainder of the $1,000 to be repaid would still only be a liability unless any part of it also becomes due.

       Another example of a liability would be in cases when a Home receives outreach tools from their PPC on credit, and promises to pay for these tools at a specific rate per month. As long as they are faithfully paying the agreed amount each month, then the total amount they owe to the PPC is a liability. Liabilities only become debts when they are not paid on time, and are then the non-payment or late payment of bills.

       If your Home has liabilities, you won't be put on Probationary Notice, providing you are staying current on your payments of the agreed-upon amounts.

       While you remain part of the Home, you—collectively with everyone else—are responsible for the debts and liabilities. This doesn't mean that each person in the Home has to bring in a certain amount of money to pay the debts or liabilities, as in some Homes there will be those whose main ministry is outreach, while others care for the children, and so forth. Thos e on outreach would generally be the ones to bring in the finances, while those in childcare make it possible for the outreach teams to go out by caring for the children.

       Hopefully Homes will stay out of debt; however, if yours doesn't, and you wish to leave your Home that has run up debts, then you are responsible to pay your portion of the debts and liabilities before you leave, 16- and 17-year-olds excluded. Your Home came to a united agreement on its financial decisions, and thus you are responsible for a portion of these debts and liabilities. If the result of those decisions is that your Home goes into debt, you must share in the blame.

       If you choose to leave a Home, your portion of the Home debts and liabilities will have to be determined. The following is the formula for this: One portion equals the sum of debts and liabilities divided by the number of voting members 18 and over. So if you have 10 voting members (who have reached the age of 18) and your Home is $1,000 in de bt, then your portion is $100. (A debt or liability of $1,000 divided by 10 voting members over the age of 18 equals $100.) So before you can leave the Home, you need to contribute $100 to the Home to cover your portion, unless for some reason the Home votes to free you from this payment.

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       This is by no means a license to run up debts. We want to reiterate that it is not Family policy to have debts; but if your Home does get in debt, then such debts must be paid off.

       Debts also i nclude overdue payments on money borrowed by the Home from another member in the Home (for example, from personal funds raised to move to another field, or funds that he had brought with him to the Home and which the Home had agreed that he could keep upon joining the Home) or from a member of another Home. When the money is first borrowed, it is a liability; but if you default on paying the funds back within the agreed time, then it becomes a debt. Therefore all rules pertaining to the paying o ff of debts would apply.

       For example, someone is raising funds to move to another Home, and the Home's car breaks down. The Home doesn't have enough funds for the repairs, so it borrows some of the funds that the person had set aside for their move (in accordance with the Charter), and promises to pay the person back before they leave. At that point, the funds borrowed are a liability. However, once the person leaves the Home, and the repayment is thus overdue, it becomes a Home debt. At that point, if the Home is in debt for two months, it would be subject to Probationary Notice, as with any debt.

       It is because of this clause that we have set the voting age limit for financial matters at 18. Originally we were going to allow the 16- and 17-year-olds to vote on and be responsible for the financial issues, including the Home's debts and liabilities. If we had, this would have meant that you 16- and 17-year-olds would be responsible to pay your portion of the Home's debts and liabili ties before you could join another Home. After much prayer and counsel, we felt that while you could participate in financial discussions in your Home council meetings and give your opinions, it would be best for you if you were not allowed to vote on financial matters. And thus not be responsible for the outcome of the decisions. This way you could learn about how the Home deals with its financial concerns so that you will have a full understanding of it by the time you are responsible for them when you reach 18.

       All the adults in a Home should in some way bear the responsibility of the support of the Home. All adults should be aware of the financial state of the Home. And that means all the adults should know the specifics concerning how you're doing financially—how much money is on hand, how the money is being spent, how your Home budget and buffer are doing, what bills are owed, etc.—not just percentages, but actual amounts. All adults should feel responsible for the support of the Home, not just your outreach teams or your poor Business teamworker! (ML #2929:39.)

       It will [work] if we all work together and each do his part and carry his share of the load, as well as receiving his share of the benefits!—Like those who solicit donations in return for our literature, "Muzzle not the ox that treadeth out the corn," and "The laborer is worthy of his hire," and "They that preach the Gospel shall live of the Gospel"! From each according to his ability—unto each accordi ng to his need, according to Acts 2 and 4! (ML #176:84.)

C. Determine, through voting, the Home's expenditures and other financial matters in accordance with the Responsibilities of the Charter Home: Regarding Financial Matters.

1. 16- and 17-year-old voting members have no vote or responsibility in their Home's financial decisions.

D. Bring up any matter in the appropriate Home council meeting and have it brought to a vote. The matter must be discussed and voted on within 15 days.

       Wh ile it may be most appropriate to suggest topics for Home council meetings prior to the meeting, allowing for a predetermined agenda to be followed in the meeting, you are free to bring up any matter that you want to in the appropriate Home council. However, since the meeting will probably be following a predetermined agenda, it may be inappropriate to stop everything and discuss and vote on that matter right then. The person chairing the Home council meeting will make that decision. In any case , the topic needs to be discussed and voted on within 15 days.

       After agreement is reached in a Home council meeting, the decisions of the voting members are to be implemented. So even if the Home teamwork feels the Home should do one thing, but the voting members vote to do something else, then the decision of the majority of the voting members is what should be carried out.

       We all ... need to listen to each other, counsel together, agree together, decide together and then work it out toge ther. If we're going to be an effective body, every member must work together with all the other members—not just one, not just a few, not even the majority, but with all working together as a body, which Christ described as His Body, the Church, and with Himself as the Head (ML #263:76).

4. RIGHT OF MOBILITY

       The Right of Mobility is one of the most important rights granted under the Charter. Knowing that you have the right to move from one Home to another Home, and that you can easily do so without a lot of red tape will make it possible for you to more easily remove yourself from a situation in which you are not happy. If you don't like the way the Home is run, and you can't change it through voting or Home council meetings, you are free to move without having to wait fo r the area or continental office to work it out for you.

       Giving voting members the Right of Mobility will hopefully help motivate those who are shepherding Homes to do all they can to have an inspiring Home so that those in the Home will want to remain, rather than Home members becoming discontent and dissatisfied and leaving. The reason for the Right of Mobility is not to encourage you to keep moving from Home to Home every time something comes up that you don't like. In fact, we'd like to en courage teams who have fruitful ministries to stick together rather than constantly changing personnel—but we do want to give you the opportunity to move should you feel it's necessary after prayerful consideration. If you are truly unhappy or discontent in your Home, and/or the Lord wants you to move on to another situation, you are free to do so.

       The Right of Mobility covers moving out of a Home. However, going out on road trips from your Home, visiting other Homes, personnel temporarily he lping another Home, or visiting relatives, etc., are not matters covered by this Right of Mobility section. Such matters within and between Homes should be counseled about and decided upon directly by the Home(s) involved.

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       All voting members have the "right" to move out of their Home. However, this does not mean that those under the age of 16, especially those 14 and 15, must always live in the same Home as their parents. It's just that they don't have the "right" to move upon dem and. Teens under the age of 18 are permitted to reside away from their parents providing they wish to do so, the parent(s) residing with them is/are in agreement, and the receiving Home agrees to accept them. Minors living away from their parents should have a power of attorney and/or other necessary paperwork in accordance with the laws of the country.

       If you don't like your Colony, move to another!... But please notify your Colony leaders or supervisor that you're leaving! (ML #173:5,6.)

       I think there needs to be more freedom of choice even amongst your followers, disciples, and members of your Colonies as to which leaders they prefer to serve under and in what Colonies they prefer to work. We all need a change sometimes! (ML #161:34.)

Voting members have the right to:

A. Move out of the Home in which they reside, providing the following seven stipulations are met:

       In brief, the Right of Mobility means that you can move out of your Home as long as you meet the following seven stipulations:

       1. You are at least 18 years of age and give 30 days notice.

       2. You properly turn over your ministries and duties.

       3. You've agreed with your Home on the ministration to your contacts.

       4. Your portion of the Home's debts and liabilities is paid.

       5. Your Home is not on Probationary Notice.

       6. You as an individual are not on Probationary Status in your Home.

       7. You have worked out any necessary reporting arrangements with your Home.

       Each of the stipulations has some sub-sections under it, and all are covered in greater detail below.

1. They are at least 18 years of age and give 30 days notice in writing, stating their planned destination to the Home's officers, and send copies to, or otherwise notify the area, and continental office. From that point they become non-voting members, and have no vote in Home matters.

       Those over 18 can move out of a Home by giving 30 days notice in writing to the Home teamwork of their intention to move and their pla nned destination.

       Those wishing to move must also inform their area and continental office. Once they give their notice, they lose the right to vote on Home matters, and are freed of any responsibility for new financial obligations or debts the Home incurs.

       The decision to move out of your Home should not be made on a whim. It should be a careful and prayerful decision, taking into consideration the seven ways to know the will of God. (See "How Can I Know What God's Will Is?" Treasures, page 63.) You should be convinced that it's the Lord's will for you to do so, and it should be done "decently and in order" (1 Corinthians 14:40).

       As Dad cautioned, "May we never make a move without hearing from God. Those who succeed are those who wait upon His Word, and those that fail are those who go ahead without it!" (DM 1:141.)

       Haste makes waste, and squeeze don't jerk, or you'll miss the mark entirely and maybe land far afield somewhere else that you didn't intend to even go to! I woul d suggest in your plans ... you also plan very carefully and slowly and with great thought and prayer and care to make sure you go where the Lord wants you to be and where it'll be best for you as well as your work and ministry and finances and others with you (ML #1203:63).

       There are a number of factors to consider when contemplating moving out of your Home. One of the main factors is that each of us has a responsibility to the Home we live in, and should take into account what effect our d eparture will have on the Home and its ministries. If a number of Home members decide to leave in 30 days, it may mean that those remaining behind will not be able to sustain the ministries of the Home, and consequently those fruitful ministries will suffer or be lost, and this may result in many people losing the opportunity to hear the Gospel.

       The Right of Mobility is meant to make it possible for those who definitely feel the Lord wants them to change Homes to do so easily. It is not a gene ral call for all of us to hit the road to become "roving rebel bands!"—Nor is it being given to promote individuals abandoning their Homes and ministries.

       Our prayer, intent and desire is that all such moves will be prayerful and responsible decisions; that when the Lord leads you to move, you will "squeeze, not jerk"; and that you will take into account the needs of your Home before doing so. For example, it might be appropriate to inform your Home that you feel called to another area, but t hat you are willing to stay temporarily to fulfill your commitments to the Home and give them time to try to find a replacement before you go.

       When you move into a new Home, you should do so with the attitude that you are investing yourself in the work. As with any investment, it takes time for it to yield a dividend or to bear fruit; thus you should be prepared to remain in your new Home long enough to bear that fruit. If you have sought the Lord about your move and He has led you to that Hom e, then you should resolve that the Lord wants you to invest in that Home and its ministries. You should commit yourself to working in that Home and remaining in it through thick and thin, through the good times and the bad. Your first impulse shouldn't be to give your 30-day notice and leave if things don't go as well as you hoped they would. You should first do all you can to change the situation, through prayer, discussion and example, and keep plugging away, investing in the work the Lord ha s called you to. As Dad said years ago in "Shtick," "You'd better stick it out until you know God wants you to leave a job and you know He's finished with you there and He's got something else He wants you to do" (ML #703:47).

       There's a time to move, but there's also a time to stay put. There's a time for guerrilla action ... but there's also a time to establish a Colony!... There's a time to "counter the vagabond outlook and draw active and militant workers into the army" instead of just ro ving rebels who like to travel! (ML #127:34,38.)

       However, if and when the Lord does lead you to move, you should take into account all the details required for you to accomplish your move before giving your 30-day notice. For example, if you plan to move a long distance, it will require your having funds for the fare, plus if traveling to another country is required, you will need clearance from the continental office of that area. If you plan to move to another Home, you will need the agree ment of the Home receiving you. All of this will take time, and in many cases longer than 30 days. So you would be well advised not to actually give your official 30-day notice until you are close to having your funds and clearance in hand.

       Let's look at the following scenario of a wise way to prayerfully plan a departure from a Home. A YA couple with one child living in Japan feels called to go to Brazil. They pray about it together, apply the "Seven Ways to Know God's Will" (see ML #829), he ar from the Lord on the matter, consult and pray together with their Home's teamwork and come to the conclusion it is the Lord's will for them to go. Because they are going to another continental area, they write for clearance. (See Clearance Request Form in Appendix B.)

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       Knowing that the continental office, upon receiving their request, has up to 30 days to respond before the YAs are automatically cleared, they decide to use the time for preparation and fundraising. Since they are not directly in contact with a Home in Brazil that they plan to join, at the same time they send the CRO their Clearance Request Form, they also send a Want Ad. The Want Ad, once published by the CRO, will offer the couple different possibilities of Homes whom might be interested in receiving them. (See more on this subject under point L., of Responsibilities of Continental officers. See also Want Ad Guidelines in Appendix B.)

       They investigate fares to Brazil, and find that it will cost $3,50 0 for the three of them. They realize they need landing funds as well, so they set an overall goal of $5,000 to cover their fares and landing funds. They then discuss the financial side of the matter with the Home teamwork and Home members, explaining to the Home their plans and the methods by which they hope to raise the fares. (In this case, their Home has no debts, and therefore they are not responsible for any debts or liabilities.) This may include asking their grandparents or other relativ es for help, perhaps approaching some of the Home's contacts, setting aside a bit from the funds they bring in by distributing outreach tools, etc. The Home would then discuss and pray about the matter and decide if the financial plan is good and whether they agree. (This is covered more fully in the Financial Rules, D.) The Home may even decide to have an attack day each month to help towards the fundraising.

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       Once the couple's clearance from the continental office is official, or the 30-day waiting period is expired without reply from the continental office, they've found a Home in Brazil to receive them, and they have most of the funds, they might decide it's time to make their reservations, and give their 30-day notice, estimating that by the end of the 30 days they will be ready to go. (See Thirty-Day Right of Mobility Notice in Appendix B.)

       Another scenario: A single person decides, after prayerful consideration, that it's the Lord's will for him to move to anothe r Home in the same country. He would probably talk to and pray with his Home teamwork about the situation. He would come to an agreement of how much outreach he needs to do to pay off his portion of the Home's debt and to raise his fare. If he feels he can raise that amount of funds in time, he might decide to give the Home his 30-day notice at that time. During the 30 days he could work on finding a Home in the country that will agree to take him in, or agree with a few partners to go pioneer a new Home with him. Since travel fares within a country are normally not too expensive, this is not a major obstacle, and since he's staying in the same country, he does not need clearance from the continental office. So once his 30 days are up, and his portion of the debt is paid, he is free to leave.

       So as you can see, you wouldn't want to give your 30-day notice to the Home until you have prayerfully counted the cost, made your plans, and have considered all the factors.

       The clause also s tates that you should inform the area and continental office of your planned destination. If you are going to be a road team Home, you may not know your exact location, but you should at least try to outline your general plans so your area office is kept aware of your movement and plans within the area. (When you leave the Home, the Home should also make mention in the personnel section of your TRF of your departure and destination.)

       Also if one or more of the Home officers give their 30-day n otice to leave the Home, and thus no longer have a vote in Home affairs, elections should be held to select a new Home officer(s) as outlined in the Election Rules, B.

       Another possible scenario might be if a number of Home members decided to move from the Home, and thus gave their 30-day notice. With the projected decrease in Home population, it might make it impossible for the Home to be able to continue functioning, either due to not enough personnel for its ministry or now being unable to m eet its financial overhead, such as if the Home has a high rent. In such a case, those members which did not give their 30-day notice might need to meet and pray about whether they feel they can find enough new personnel in time to fill the need, or if they should also decide to give their 30-day notice, thus effectively deciding to close the Home. Details on closing a Home can be found under sections Responsibilities of the Charter Home: Regarding Financial Matters and Rights of the Charter Hom e.

       Another factor, which will need to be worked out by the Home and the departing member, is the continued follow-up of the friends and witnessing contacts the member may be ministering to. The criterion in deciding how to handle this should be what is best for each friend's spiritual life as outlined in point 2.

a) The 30-day departure period can be shortened by a two-thirds majority vote of the Home.

       You must remain a member of your present Home until the 30 days is expired unless the H ome votes to waive or shorten the period. Besides allowing you time to work out your transfer to a new Home, including taking care of fundraising and so forth, the 30 days is to allow the Home time to attempt to find a replacement for you. This is especially important if you fill a vital role within the Home, or if your leaving will reduce the number of voting members to below the minimum Home size of four voting members.

       In the case of the YA couple going to Brazil, mentioned earlier, if they had gathered all of their fare and received their clearance, and if the Home had already found a replacement and there was no other reason for them to remain in the Home, the Home could vote to waive the 30 days so they could leave right away.

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b) Members 16 and 17 years of age must give 30 days notice in writing, stating their planned destination to the Home's officers, and send a copy to, or otherwise notify, their area and continental office. Such teens must inform and receive w ritten permission from at least one parent or guardian. From that point they become non-voting members, and have no vote in Home matters.

       If a 16- or 17-year-old (senior teen) wants to move out of their Home, they must give a 30-day notice to their Home teamwork, and send the area and continental office a copy. They must also inform and get the agreement and written permission of at least one of their parents or their guardians before they can make such a move. Since many of the parents of our senior teens are not living with them, approval from only one parent is needed. However, if the teen is living with both parents, then both should agree to let the teen move on.

       Throughout the Charter we are trying as much as possible to give our 16- and 17-year-old members the same rights as all other voting members, except on financial matters as explained earlier. They carry a big load in the Home, and their ideas and suggestions carry equal weight to that of all other voting members. They know the Lord, and can be just as prayerful as other voting members. Although younger and less mature, if they don't get involved in the decision-making process of the Home while senior teens, it will take them much longer to grow into responsible adults.

       We are expecting you senior teens to take your responsibilities seriously, and to understand that they are being given to you because Dad and Mama have always felt that you play an important role in the Family. It will now be up to you to sh ow that you can prayerfully and maturely participate in the governing of your Home.

       Although we have tried to give you all of the same rights as the other voting members, there are a few that we have held back or modified slightly, mainly for legal reasons. You need one of your parents' written permission to move Homes for legal reasons. In many countries those under 18 are still their parents' legal responsibility, so we feel it necessary for you to have written (and perhaps even notarized) p ermission to be living away from them. In order to protect the overall Family, it is necessary to make this stipulation before you can exercise your Right of Mobility.

       The spirit of the Right of Mobility is to allow 16- and 17-year-olds the full right to move Homes if they feel it is the Lord's will. However, because in some countries they are still considered underage, they must have permission from their parents. The decision to grant them permission is yours, parents, but we hope you will d ecide according to the intent of this clause in the Charter. Of course, there may be times when you feel your 16 or 17-year-old may need to remain in their present Home, especially if they have problems that require shepherding by those in the Home; in which case you might not want to grant them permission to move. Generally, though, we would hope that you would grant them permission to move if they wish.

       It is up to you parents to decide what type of permission you wish to give to your senior teens. You may want to give permission each time they want to move, or you may want to give a general overall permission, or an overall permission with some stipulations. The following are a few of the possibilities:

       1. Allow them to move anywhere within their present country or language area, but ask for further permission if they wish to change countries.

       2. Allow them to move anywhere within their continental area, but ask for further permission if they wish to change CRO areas.

       3. All ow them to move, subject to their Home or area office approval.

       4. Allow them to move wherever and whenever they choose.

       There are many possibilities, but whatever you choose, you should make it very clear and specific in your letter of permission. (See Parental Permission Form in Appendix B.)

       16- and 17-year-olds should be sure to get parental permission before giving 30 days notice to the Home.

(1) If the parents of a 16 or 17-year-old teen do not live within the same continental ar ea as their teen, they may authorize the teen's continental office to give permission for the movement of their teen within its continental area.

       Our senior teens sometimes don't live on the same continent as their parents. Therefore, since the parents may not know the full situation about their older teens, or for some other reason, they may be hesitant to give their senior teen standing permission to move whenever he wishes. In such a case the parents can authorize the continental office to approve their teen's movements from Home to Home. The parents should be sure that their 16 or 17-year-old has a letter of parental permission to travel, which will need to be notarized if required by law.

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2. Prepare to leave in an orderly fashion, by turning over pertinent ministry material and thoroughly explaining their ministries, duties and responsibilities to the appropriate person(s).

       During the 30-day period, the departing member must turn over all of his ministry material , as well as explain his ministry or Home duties to whomever the Home decides. This is important if the Home is to continue to function well, so anyone moving should endeavor to be very faithful in passing on his or her duties.

       Please don't desert your posts of duty without replacements or reinforcements! (ML #176:27.)

       May God bless both you shepherds and sheep who did have the faith, got the funds, took care of your responsibilities, consulted with your leaders, agreed together on the wil l of God, provided for those dependent on you, and found a replacement to take care of them (ML #175:56).

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3. The Home and departing member(s) should agree together on which of the Home's contacts should continue to be ministered to by the Home or by the departing member(s), and who would receive support from them. The Home members should endeavor to reach a loving solution that accommodates the need of both the Home and the departing member(s). Above all, the friends or contact's s piritual growth and personal desires should be taken into consideration.

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a) If a departing member(s) has been ministering personally to any of the Home's contacts, they may continue to do so from a different city or country. However, they should ask the Home's permission before requesting financial help from these contacts, unless the contact specifically expresses his desire to support the departing member(s) and their new Home, in which case the contact should be transferred to t he departing member.

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b) If the departing member(s) is moving to another Home in the same city or vicinity, they may continue to follow up on and minister to the friends and supporters who they have been personally feeding and ministering to, as well as continue to receive whatever support their friend wishes to give them. They should, however, encourage their supporters to support their former Home, should their former Home depend on that support—particularly if the Home they are moving to is already sufficiently supported. However, if the contact wants to support the departing member(s) instead, he should be transferred to the departing member's new Home.

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c) In cases where a Home divides in two, with departing members opening a new Home in the same city or vicinity, they should agree together as to who will care for each contact. If they are unable to reach a decision, they should equally divide the gifts they receive from these friends, if this is agreeab le to their supporters. If a supporter is not agreeable to dividing it equally, he may give his support to whomever he chooses.

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d) If a departing member(s) is moving to another city and will not be able to continue personal contact with their supporters, they may continue to minister to them via mail. However, they should ask others in the Home they are leaving to continue to follow up on their contacts, and should ask their supporters if they would be willing to continue to suppor t their former Home. If a supporter wishes to send the departing member some regular or occasional support, it is the supporter's prerogative to do so.

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       It's difficult, if not impossible, to design a rule that would cover every situation that may come up when dividing friends and contacts. Each situation must be judged on its own merits, within the above general guidelines. The basic foundation of this clause is that great care must be taken to try to reach a solution together, in love and through counsel and prayer, that is acceptable to both the Home and the departing member(s), with the needs of all (most of all, the sheep) taken into account.

       A departing member may continue to follow up on any friends and contacts they have been personally ministering to, whether in person or by phone. If a member is moving to or opening a new Home in the same city, they may continue to receive support from these contacts if the friend wants to continue to support or help them; but the departing member should not pressure the contact for his continued support if the contact would rather support the remaining Home instead.

       If the member who has been ministering to certain contacts is moving to a Home that is already sufficiently supported, he should be willing to encourage his contacts to support his former Home (particularly if they have been dependent on this support); and his former Home should be willing to spiritually feed and minister to these friends.

       In each cas e, it would be important to explain to your friends what is happening when there are personnel moves or when a Home divides in two, and also include them in the decision-making process. The friend will feel and know who is truly concerned about feeding them spiritually, and this is whom they will want to help and support. The needs of your friends are paramount, and their burdens and desires must be respected.

       It is not possible to make a rule for each instance or possibility that may come up. However, the needs of the contacts, the departing members, their new Home, as well as their former Home, should be lovingly considered by all those involved. Since financial matters are sensitive, it is paramount that all parties proceed with a large measure of prayer and love, striving to maintain unity. Contacts and supporters should never be turned against other Family members in an effort to gain their support.

       Besides coming to agreement about the financial factor of who the friends give their support to, there are a myriad of other subjects that need to be discussed concerning the follow-up of sheep when more than one Family member or Home is in contact with that person. So Home members should do all they can to work in unity and prefer their brethren as well as the needs of their friends more than themselves. If a loving settlement cannot be reached between the two parties, and it erupts into serious disunity, this would be in violation of the Responsibilities of the Charter Home, point I., as well as the Responsibilities of Individual Members, points F., and S and T. In such a case, both parties may be subject to Probationary Notice until their differences can be resolved amicably.

4. Their portion of the Home's debts and liabilities is paid.

       As explained earlier, once someone decides to leave a Home, they must pay their portion of debts and liabilities. Hopefully, though, your Home won't have any debt, and thus this will not apply. The receiving Home can also offer to pay the debt of any prospective members if they want them sooner (see D. 6. of this section).

a) 16- and 17-year-old members are exempt from this requirement.

b) A Home may, by a two-thirds majority, free a departing member from all or some of his portion of the Home's debts and/or liabilities, providing the remaining Home members assume his or her portion.

       The Home can free someone from their portion of the Home's debts and liabilities if they so wish, but they do so knowing t hat they take on the departing member's portion and are responsible to pay it. (See also Responsibilities of the Charter Home: Regarding Financial Matters, B. 3. a).)

       We explained the difference between debts and liabilities earlier. (See Rights of the Individual: Within the Home, B. 1. a).) There may be cases where the Home decides that since the departing member will no longer benefit from the effects of a liability, that he or she should be free from paying it. For example, a Home has $2,00 0 set aside to buy a van and they find a van for $4,000, and vote to take a $2,000 Home loan from their continental office to buy the van. Soon afterwards, a member of the Home decides to move to another area. Since the Home has a liability of $2,000, they figure out the departing member's portion. However, they may decide that since the departing member will not benefit from the use of the van, since he will no longer be in the Home, they will free him from his portion of that liability.

c) If debts and liabilities have been incurred, the person wishing to leave must be given sufficient time, on a regular basis, to engage in fundraising activities until his or her portion of the debts and liabilities has been paid.

(1) At least 50% of the net income generated through the member's fundraising activities is to be used for no other purpose than the payment of his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities.

       To pay off your portion of the Home's debt or liability, you need to be g iven time off from your ministry for outreach or engaging in some other form of fundraising. Of course, you would still be expected to help with regular Home duties. The Home can determine what amount of those funds will go towards the payment of your debt or liability, but it must be at least 50% of the net income. If you bring in $100 in a day of fundraising, the seed corn for tools and the tithe on that $100 will first need to be taken out. If the seed corn is $20 and the tithe and FAF contri bution is approximately $9 on the net income of $80, it will leave $71. Of that $71, the Home must use at least 50%, or a minimum of $35.50, towards paying off your portion of the Home's debt or liability, which would decrease your portion accordingly. (The Home can decide to use more than 50% of the net income for your portion of the debt or liability, but not less.)

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       Since you are still living in the Home and are eating and sleeping there, it is only fair that some of the funds y ou bring in from outreach be used to cover your share of the regular monthly expenses. The Home must still carry on and meet its current operating expenses. So the funds you bring into the Home, above the minimum 50% of your net income earmarked to pay your portion of the Home's debts or liabilities, are to be used by the Home for their current operating expenses, just as any funds from outreach would be used. These current operating expenses include the Home's food, transportation, rents, phone , utilities such as electricity, water, gas, etc.

       This means that current operating expenses are not to be considered debts or liabilities. (See equation for debts and liabilities under B. 1., in the Rights of the Individual: Within the Home.) Therefore the percentage of the funds which go towards the running of the Home pays for the member's share of the rents, phone, utilities, and all other current operating expenses, and the percentage designated to pay the member's debts or travel/landing funds must be used solely for that purpose.

       The percentage from a departing member's fund raising, that the Home has decided that he should turn over to help support the Home while he continues to live in the Home, is meant to cover his share of the Home's current month's operating expenses, which include rent, phone, utilities, etc. He cannot be charged again for the Home's monthly operating expenses from the percentage the Home has agreed that he be permitted to use to pay off his share of the Home's debts and liabilities and to keep as travel/landing funds.

       For example: A Home agrees that departing member John should be allowed to save 50% of his net income to pay off his share of the Home's debts and liabilities from his fund raising. And that once his debts and liabilities are paid off, he can keep this same 50% of his net income to build up travel/landing funds for his move to his next Home. It is also agreed that the remaining 50% of John's net income is to be turned in to the Home to help cover the Home's current operating expenses (food, rent, utilities, phone, etc.), for as long as John continues to live there. This means that during the time that John is fund raising to depart, he is only required to give 50% of his net income to the Home to cover its operating expenses, and the other 50% is to be used exclusively to pay off his share of the debts and liabilities, or, once John's portion of the Home's debts and liabilities are paid, to facilitate his move to h is next Home. If the Home has some big bills or other expenses coming up, John cannot be required to give from the 50% that he's allowed to keep for his debt/liabilities and/or travel/landing funds, to pay for those or any other Home expenses (see also: Right of Mobility, A. 4. c) (1)). (Of course if John were to decide on his own to give some of the money he's saved up to help pay for a Home expense, that's his prerogative. But the Home cannot require him to do so.)

       A Home might be doing well financially with no debts or liabilities, and may even have a surplus of funds. If so, the Home may want to consider sharing some of its surplus funds with the departing member by paying his fare and/or giving him landing funds. If the Home has it, the Lord will bless their sharing it.

       To help make this clause more understandable, let's take the following scenario: Two Home members have decided to pioneer a Home together and have given their 30-day notice. It is determined that each of their portions of the Home debts and liabilities is $200, or a total of $400. They are both freed from their ministries in order to do outreach to pay off this amount. The two go on outreach together and each brings in $100 for the day. In this case, let's say the tithe, FAF contribution and seed corn for each is $30, which leaves each with $70. Of this, 50% ($35) must go towards the payment of the debt or liability, and the other $35 would go to the Home. So on that day, each of these members decreas ed their $200 portion of the debt or liability by $35, so they each now owe $165. The Home received $35 from each of these members for Home expenses.

       Another scenario that you may be faced with is if only one Home member has decided to leave an existing Home. He gives his 30-day notice and is informed that his portion of Home debts and liabilities is $200. Assuming that most witnessing teams common pot the funds they bring in, the Home might decide that the person moving and his witnessing par tner put their proceeds for the day together, take out the tithe and seed corn, and then divide it by two. The half that goes to the departing member is considered to be his or her net income for the day. He will then turn in 50% of his net income to the Home to use, while the other 50% goes toward payment of his portion of the Home's debt or liability.

       Let's say this team of two brings in $200 for the day and the tithe, FAF contribution and seed corn together is $40, which would leave $160. T hey divide the $160 between them, so each has $80. This $80 is the departing member's net income for the day. 50% of his net income, $40, is to be used for his portion of the Home's debt or liability. The other $40 is used by the Home. The departing member has now decreased his $200 portion of the debt or liability by $40, and he owes another $160. The net income of the partner who is remaining in the Home will be used by the Home.

       For that day the Home received $120 from this witnessing team- -$40 from the departing member and $80 from the remaining member—while $40 went to tithe and seed corn funds and the other $40 went towards the payment of the departing member's liability.

       If there are more people on a witnessing team, the departing member will still be entitled to use 50% of his portion of the net income towards his debts and liabilities. For example, a group of 10 witnessers do a performance and distribute tools to the large crowd. Let's say the payment for the performance and the donations for the tools amounts to $3,000. After the tithe, FAF contribution and seed corn is deducted, the income is $2,500. The $2,500 is divided by 10, since there are 10 members on the team, so the departing member's income for the day is $250. Half of this would go towards the payment of his or her debts and liabilities ($125) and the other half would be used by the Home.

(2) Once the member's debts and liabilities have been paid, at least 50% of the net income generated through the member's fundraising activities is to be used to facilitate his move. The amount needed to facilitate the move must be agreed upon by the Home, in accordance with the Financial Rules, D.

       If a member departing from the Home has no debts or liabilities or has paid them off, he probably still needs to raise travel funds to his next location. Obviously a farther move would involve a larger amount of travel funds than a move to a nearby Home. The Home can, by a two-thirds majority vote, decide to let people raising travel funds keep more than 50% of their net outreach income, in case the departing member or family has a large amount to raise or needs to do so quickly. However, the Home cannot decide to only give them less than 50% of their net outreach income.

       Once agreed upon, the departing member could engage in fundraising, and the same minimum 50% set-up, as described above, would be used for setting aside travel funds. Once the agreed-upon amount was reached, the member would r esume turning in all outreach funds to the Home. He would no longer need time off from his ministry for fundraising. So if he has given his 30-day notice and has his funds according to whatever arrangements he worked out with the Home, then during the remainder of his 30-day period he would be at the disposal of the Home for whatever duties and ministries he might be needed for.

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(i) While 16- and 17-year-olds are not held responsible for the Home's financial decisions and obligatio ns, if they are raising support to move to another Home, 50% of the income they generate through fund-raising activities is to be used for no other purpose than for the Home's current operating expenses.

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       While our 16- and 17 -year -old voting members are not responsible for the Home's debts and liabilities, if they are raising funds to move on to another Home they should continue to contribute to the Home's operating expenses, which should not be more than 50% of their fund-raisin g income.

d) Upon giving 30-day notice to the Home, the member will not be held responsible for the payment of any new debts or liabilities agreed to or incurred by the Home.

       Once you've given your 30-day notice, and have relinquished your right to vote in Home matters, including financial matters, you are freed from all responsibility on decisions made by the Home (except Home regulations).

(1) If for some reason the member remains in the Home over one week past his 30-day notice, he on ce again regains his voting rights and is responsible for any new debts or liabilities incurred by the Home, unless the Home, by a two-thirds majority, agrees to extend the departure date.

       Once the 30-day period is over, you are expected to leave the Home within seven days. There will be times when your plans don't work out the way you expect, and you may find you have given your 30-day notice prematurely and thus you are not able to leave within seven days after the 30-day period ends, or 37 days after originally having given your Home written notice. Perhaps the Home you were planning to move to suddenly closed or all of your travel funds didn't come through. If you've come to the end of your 37 days and you can't leave for one reason or another, then you once again become a voting member of your present Home, and are therefore responsible for the decisions of the Home, including any new debts or liabilities that are incurred from that time onward.

       The Home can vote to extend the 37 days, if they so wish. If, for example, the funds your relatives promised for your fare haven't arrived yet, the Home may decide to extend your stay with them without making you accountable for the decisions of the Home or for any debts or liabilities they incur. Or the Home may want to work out a plan whereby some of the income you bring in goes to cover your portion of Home expenses during the extra time that you are there, or some other agreeable solution.

       On the other hand, if you give your 30-day notice, and at the end of 37 days you are basically no further prepared for a move than you were at the beginning of this period, the Home may decide not to extend the period, and if you wish to stay in the Home you must resume the responsibilities of a voting member. In such a case, if you remain longer than 37 days, and the Home does not agree to extend your period, you regain your voting rights, and once again are responsible for the decisions of the Home, including its financial decisions. You are also responsible for any debts or liabilities that arise from that time onward.

e) The member is free to depart when his 30-day notice expires and his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities has been paid.

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f) If the member's plans change and he decides to remain in the Home, or will be making a move that will require less funds than the original amount voted on, the funds which the Home allowed the member to set aside in preparation for his move should be returned to the Home. If he is making a move that will require less funds than he raised, the Home must give him the funds needed, and vote on the remainder. If he is remaining in the Home, the Home will decide, by a two-thirds majority vote, for what purpose these funds should be allocated.

       In some situations the Home member, having raised a certain amount of funds to leave the Home and travel to another area, may decide to remain in the Home or the same field after all, or his plans may cha nge due to new circumstances. In this case, since the Home allowed the member to take time off Home duties to raise these funds, it seems only right that if the funds are not used for the purpose of the move as originally intended, then they should be returned to the Home.

       If the member is moving to a closer destination, requiring less funds, the Home will give the departing member the funds needed for the move. The Home would then decide, by a two-thirds majority vote, whether to allow the me mber to keep the rest of the funds, or a portion of them, for personal needs, etc., or whether the funds should be incorporated into the Home's coffers, or set aside for some specified Home expenditure, etc.

       If the member is remaining in the Home and not moving to a new Home, then the Home would decide by a two-thirds majority on the use of entire amount of funds raised by the member.

5. The Home in which they reside is not on Probationary Notice.

a) Members of Homes which are on Probati onary Notice temporarily relinquish their Right of Mobility unless they were put on Probationary Notice due to the Home population being too large.

b) Members who have given their 30-day notice to move prior to the Home being placed on Probationary Notice retain their Right of Mobility.

       A Home that has contravened some of the conditions of the Charter may be placed on Probationary Notice and be given a set time by leadership to rectify the situation, in order to retain its Charter Member st atus. Once a Home is placed on Probationary Notice, an individual member may not give his 30-day notice until such time as the Home's Probationary Notice has been lifted. However, if he's already given notice before the Home goes on Probationary Notice, he is still free to leave the Home at the end of this 30-day period.

       The one exception to this is if the Home has been put on Probationary Notice because their Home population is too large. In such a case, the only way to get off of Probationar y Notice is for some of the members to move out of the Home; thus the Home members do not lose their Right of Mobility.

(1) Members of the Home can, by a two-thirds majority, appeal to their continental office for the Right of Mobility of a member to be temporarily suspended.

       There may be an occasion when someone has caused problems in a Home that played a major part in a Home not fulfilling its responsibilities or in breaking the "Fundamental Family Rules." If this individual realizes in a dvance that the Home is about to be placed on Probationary Notice, he may decide to quickly put in his 30-day notice, so he won't have to remain in the Home until the Home makes the necessary changes. In such a case, since this person played a major role in the Home's problem, but could theoretically avoid having to rectify it if he were to give his notice right before the Probationary Notice goes into effect, the Home may petition the continental office to have the member's Right of Mobility su spended in order for him to remain and help rectify the situation.

6. They are not on Probationary Status in the Home in which they presently reside.

a) Members who are on Probationary Status temporarily relinquish their Right of Mobility.

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       As explained in the Procedures for Placing a Member on Probationary Status, a Home can, by a simple majority, place a member of the Home on Probationary Status for up to a three-month period, as a disciplinary measure. During the assigned Probationary Status period, the member temporarily loses his Right of Mobility.

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7. While members are in transit to their new Home and/or making preparations to open their own Home, their former Home may allow them to remain on their TRF for a maximum of two reporting periods after they physically leave the Home, providing the Home receives their stats, tithe and 1% FAF contribution during this period.

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a) Once a member has been listed as outgoing on their former Home's TRF, they have until the next reporting date to either appear on the TRF of the next Home receiving them, or to open up their own Home in accordance with the Definition of a Charter Home.

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(1) After being dropped from their former Home's TRF, if a member does not appear on a Charter TRF by the next reporting date, Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status will begin.

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(i) In hardship cases the continental office may grant an extension of one additi onal reporting period. After this extension the member must appear on a TRF.

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(2) If the departing members are opening their own Home, they have the option to remain with Fellow Members or non-Family members for a further reporting period, in accordance with Definition of a Charter Home, C. 1. However, they must report as their own Home during this period.

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(i) The continental office may extend this one reporting period if they feel it is warranted.

       All Charter Member s must report and tithe every single month, by appearing on an existing Home's TRF or sending in their own. This means that members leaving a Home must arrive at the Home they are moving to, and/or join another Home, or start their own Home by the time the next TRF is due, after being dropped from their former Home's TRF.

       The members' former Home is permitted to keep them on their TRF for a maximum of two reporting periods after they have physically left the Home, providing that they receive t he members' tithe, 1% FAF contribution and stats for each TRF during that period, and incorporate these with their Home's TRF in addition to the absent member(s)' personal statistics.

       Once members are dropped from their former Home's TRF, they would then have until the next reporting date to either appear on the TRF of the Home receiving them, or open their own Home in accordance with the Definition of a Charter Home. We hope that in most cases this three reporting period maximum will allow me mbers time to reach their final destination without obligating them to open their own Home for just a month or two.

       If a Charter family or individual members are in transit, and time requires them to open their own Home (having not yet reached their destination), they may remain with Fellow Members, relatives or friends for up to a month. The continental office has the option of extending this period if they feel it is warranted. In that case, they would be required to TRF and tithe during thi s time but would not be eligible to receive new Charter mailings until they move into their own house or property (at which time they could order the mailings they missed).

       Please note that the above applies to members who are leaving their Home to join another Home, or open their own Home, and will be in transit for a period of time in between. If you are temporarily away from your Home on an extended road trip, or visiting relatives, etc., and will be returning to your existing Home (and thu s remain on their TRF), this is simply a matter to be counseled about and decided upon between you and your Home. (For further details on temporarily being away from your Home, see explanation under the Definition of a Charter Home, C. 1. and the introduction to the Right of Mobility section.)

       If you are actually in transit to a new Home, in order to qualify to remain on your former Home's TRF after physically departing from the Home, you must report your stats and send in your tithe during th e time period that you remain on your former Home's TRF. This period is not to exceed two reporting periods after you have physically left the Home.

       While in transit and not physically in the Home, the Home may not forward copies of CM mailings to you, although you may read them if visiting another Charter Home.

       All Charter Members must tithe and be included on a TRF each month to remain Charter Members, even while in transit. (See World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules, A.)

B. Open a Home in any city within their present country of residence that has no Charter Family Home, providing they are 18 years of age, and have notified their continental office of their intention to do so, and the city is not "closed."

       Those who have reached the age of 18 are free to open a Home in any city in the same country in which they presently live, as long as the city doesn't already have a Charter Home, and it is not a "closed" city. (A continental office has the authority to declare a city , or some or all of the cities in a metropolitan area, as "closed," in accordance with the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home, A. to prevent further Homes from opening if deemed necessary.)

       Those who have reached the age of 18, as outlined above, are free to open a Home in any city in the same country in which they presently live. The Home must have a minimum of two voting members to start with, to be increased to four members within six months (see Home Si ze Rules, A.). No approval or clearance from area or continental offices is required. If you want to pioneer a new city within your present country, you can do so solely on the authority granted to you in the above clause. However, you must notify your area and continental office of your intent to move, as stated earlier.

       However, there may be rare, extraordinary circumstances surrounding the city of your choice that you might not be aware of. For example, you may be new in an area and not kno w that in the past Family members have been seriously harassed in that city. In such a case, the continental or area office may propose that you select a different city to pioneer. In most cases, after learning of the matter, the team would probably decide to pioneer elsewhere. However, if they still wish to pioneer the city, they may do so. If the continental office feels the matter is serious enough, they may bring the matter to WS leadership's attention and ask for their intervention.

       Those who open new Homes should immediately inform their continental office of their mailing address so they can begin receiving their WS mailings.

1. Members 16 and 17 years of age are entitled to this right, providing two members of the Home are 25 years of age or older.

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a) The Continental Office may grant permission for a member under 18 to live in a Home with their spouse or a sibling who is 18 years of age or over, even if the Home does not have two members over 25 years of age, provided the other Right of Mobility requirements have been met.

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       Senior teens, those ages 16 and 17, may also move to a new Home providing they have their parents' written permission as outlined earlier in point A. 1. b), and two members of the new Home are at least 25 years of age. 16- and 17-year-old members may apply to live in a Home if they have a sibling 18 years of age or older living in that Home, even if the Home does not have two members over 25 years of age.

       In many countries throughout the world, 16- and 17-year-olds living away from their parents or siblings with those under 25 is considered very irresponsible, and in some cases even illegal. And since the Bible says that we should "abstain from all appearance of evil" (1Thessalonians 5:22), it is best for the overall Family's sake that 16- and 17-year-olds be in Homes with older Family members. This does not take away from your Right of Mobility, it only means that if you are going to another Home, or op ening a new Home, that you must have an older sibling in the Home, or two of your co-workers must be 25 years of age or older.

C. Open a Home, or be a road team Home, in any city within their present country of residence that already has a Charter Family Home, providing they are 18 years of age and they have the agreement of the Home(s) in that city and the area office, in accordance with the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home.

1. Members 16- and 17 -ye ars of age are entitled to this right, providing two members of the Home are 25 years of age or older.

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a) The Continental Office may grant permission for a member under 18 to live in a Home with their spouse or a sibling who is 18 years of age or over, even if the Home does not have two members over 25 years of age, provided the other Right of Mobility requirements have been met.

       If you wish to open a Home in a city in your present country that already has one or more Charter Hom es, you must follow the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City That Already Has a Charter Home. As in point B.1. above, if there will be senior teens in the Home, the need for having two members 25 years of age or older, unless there is an older sibling living in the Home and continental office permission is granted, will apply.

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2. Homes within a metropolitan area (a major city with adjacent towns or cities) may conduct outreach within that metropolitan area.

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       Throug hout the Charter when we use the term "city" we are referring to a city, town or village. Some cities are in a large metropolitan area, meaning it includes the major city and the adjacent cities and towns. For example, the actual city of Los Angeles might in itself be rather small, but the metropolitan area of Los Angeles is huge and includes a number of other cities.

       In general, when referring to "cities" in the Charter, we are not talking about metropolitan areas. If a Home were already open ed in the actual city of Los Angeles, you would need to follow the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City That Already Has a Charter Home before opening a new Home there. However, you could open a Home in the city of Anaheim, which is another city on the outskirts of Los Angeles and which is part of metropolitan Los Angeles, without having to go through this procedure, if Anaheim does not have a Charter Home in it.

       Homes within a metropolitan area are free to conduct outreach within that whol e metropolitan area. This means that if, for example, a Home opens in a suburb right outside the actual Bombay city limits, Homes within the Bombay city limits may not forbid that Home from conducting outreach in Bombay itself, since they are part of the same metropolis. Likewise, the Homes within the city limits may conduct outreach in the suburbs. This makes it possible for a Home to open in an adjacent suburb or town where it's safer, rents are often cheaper or housing more available, while s till being able to conduct outreach within the city itself, unless the city is closed as outlined in Procedures for Opening a Home in a City That Already Has a Charter Home, point A.

       However, if a Home opens in a town that is not part of the metropolitan area, they must obtain permission from the Homes in the metropolitan area before they can conduct outreach in that metropolis.

       In a city or metropolitan area that has a number of Homes, the Homes are required to create a city council to coor dinate local business or logistical matters such as witnessing areas, etc. (See Required Meetings and Activities, point D.) The city council should include all the Homes in the metropolitan area, not just those within the city limits. An exception would be if there are a large number of Homes in the metropolis, and the Homes decide to divide it into two city councils.

       Those on the city council have no authority over the Homes other than that which the Homes agree to give them. Those on the cit y council are not meant to be LASs or DASs, nor do they have any shepherding responsibilities or authority over the Homes in the area.

       The city council, represented by all Homes in a city or metropolis, could also agree together on where each Home can conduct outreach within the metropolitan area, so that each Home's outreach needs are sufficiently met without there being conflict over "turf."

       If you are a road team Home, or if you go on a road trip from your Home, and want to witness in a m etropolitan area that already has a Charter Home, you must receive permission from the present Home(s) in the metropolis before doing so. It would be wise to check with your ABM about what cities or metropolitan areas have Homes in them so that you can either go witnessing in other cities, or seek permission from the Home(s) in the city/metropolis you want to witness in before you get there.

       A road team Home is one which has no fixed residence. For example, two families living in caravans and moving from place to place would be a road team Home. They would send in their own TRF and would need to have their own mailing address. Such a team would need the local Home's agreement to do outreach in a city that already has a Charter Home in it.

       A road team Home is different from a situation where some members of a Home go out on the road for a period of time, but are still listed as members of a regular Home on that Home's TRF.

       However, a road team would also need permission to do outr each in a city, other than their own, that has a Charter Home.

       If a city or a metropolitan area becomes saturated with Charter Homes, the continental office has the authority to declare some or all of the cities in the metropolitan area as "closed," in accordance with the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City That Already Has a Charter Home, A. to prevent further Homes from opening.

D. Join any Home within their present country of residence, providing a two-thirds majority of the receivin g Home agrees to receive them as members.

1. Members 16 and 17 years of age are entitled to this right, providing there are at least two members of the receiving Home 25 years of age or older. (Parental permission is also required as per the Right of Mobility, A. 1. b.).

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a) The Continental Office may grant permission for a member under 18 to live in a Home with their spouse or a sibling who is 18 years of age or over, even if the Home does not have two members over 25 years of a ge, provided the other Right of Mobility requirements have been met.

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2. If applying to join a Service Home, the continental office reserves the right to grant or deny permission to join the Home, in accordance with the Role of Personnel in a Service Home, A. 6.

       You can join any existing Home in your country if two-thirds of the voting members of that Home agree to receive you. So points B. and D. mean that you may move out of your Home and either pioneer a new Home or move into a ny existing Home within your present country without the prior approval of any leadership, as long as you fulfill point A. above.

       If applying to join a "Service Home," the continental office reserves the right to grant or deny clearance to the Home, unless the continental office has decided to grant the Service Home the right to determine the personnel make up of the Home. See Role of a Service Home and Role of Personnel in a Service Home, for further details.)

       Point C. allows you to open a new Home in a city that has other Charter Homes, providing you follow the correct procedure.

3. Upon receipt of a request from a potential member to join their Home, the Home should try to respond within 30 days, and make a final decision within a reasonable amount of time.

4. The receiving Home must verify the potential member's Charter Member status. They may also ask the member or his present Home or appropriate officers for additional information.

       When someone moves to another Home, it is the responsibility of the Home teamwork of the receiving Home to confirm that the incoming member is a bona fide Charter Member. They may also request whatever information they need about the incoming member, a résumé of his background in the Family, details of any debts or liabilities he might have, and so forth. The receiving Home is also entitled to ask for a recommendation from the member's present Home, and other officers, if they so desire. This is normally a wise thing to do.

       When a Home receives a request from someone to join their Home, they should reply within 30 days. The reply might not necessarily be a yes or a no; it may be a request for more information. However, the Home should try to give a final reply, either granting or denying clearance, within a reasonable amount of time.

5. A member of voting age intending to move to a Home has the right to know, before he moves in, what the amount of his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities will be. The receivin g Home, by a two-thirds majority, may agree to waive all or a portion of the prospective member's accountability for his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities, which they have incurred prior to his arrival.

       If you are going to join an existing Home, you have the right to know if the Home has debts or liabilities, as once you join it, you would then be responsible for a portion of them. You can ask, and they must tell you, what the amount of your portion of the debts and liabilities would amount to. The receiving Home may, if two-thirds of the Home agree, waive all or some of your portion of the Home's debts or liabilities that they have accumulated up to the time you join.

       In order to avoid future misunderstandings, it would be wise for the incoming member to ask the business teamworker to write down the amount of his portion of the Home's debt or liabilities.

6. The receiving Home has the right to know the amount of any debts or liabilities of a prospective new member, an d understands that it must either assume the debts and liabilities collectively, or allow the new member sufficient time to engage in fundraising activities to pay the debts and liabilities.

a) At least 50% of the net income generated through the member's fundraising activities is to be used for no purpose other than the payment of the debts and liabilities.

       Since you normally are unable to leave a Home until your portion of its debts and liabilities is paid, it would be rare for this claus e to be used. However, there will be times that a Home must close immediately, perhaps because of persecution, or the owner decides he's going to sell the house and you must leave immediately. In such a case, even though they no longer live in the Home, the Home members may still have a portion of their debts and liabilities to pay. (See Responsibilities of the Charter Home: Regarding Financial Matters, B. 4.) In such a case, the receiving Home has the right to know of any new member's debts or liabilities ahead of time since they will need to assume this amount due or allow time for the new member to raise the funds to pay his portion of it.

       The incoming member should also inform the Home of any upcoming expenses that the new member may generate in the near future. For example, if the new member and his family must take a visa trip within the next month or so, they should inform the new Home of that fact ahead of time, so the Home will be aware of this upcoming expense.

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7. Before a new member joins a Home, an agreement should be reached between the Home and the new member as to which of his or her possessions the new member would be authorized to take with him or her if he or she should decide to leave the Home.

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       We are all expected to fully live Acts 2:44-45 in our lives and Homes. This clause has nothing to do with our Family's commitment to live unselfishly and give and share all that we have with others. Nevertheless, joining a new Home is a big step, and sometimes after a while, people find they have different burdens or goals or are otherwise not compatible with the other members of the Home. We have added the above clause to make the separation and dividing of assets as smooth as possible, should after some time the Home and a member (or members) find that they are not suited to working together. This will ensure that families or individuals who leave a Home will know exactly what they will be able to take with them when they de part, hopefully avoiding contention and disputes with the Home over material possessions at that time. This clause would also include a new disciple when he finishes his six months babes training and is about to become a new voting member.

       For example, if a family proposes to join a Home and they have a car and caravan, some furniture, cash, a computer, etc., before they officially join and move in it should be decided which of these items they would take with them if they should decide to lea ve the Home. They might decide to keep the car and caravan should they move on, and that the furniture, cash and computer would become part of the Home's assets.

       Possession of whatever assets are not predetermined before the new member(s) officially become Home members will be handled upon the departure of the member or the closing of the Home in accordance with C. 3. and C. 4. of the Rights of the Charter Home.

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E. Move to any country, or be a witnessing road team for over 30 day s in any country, providing they have received clearance from the continental office of the prospective country. Except in the case of sensitive countries, clearance is automatically granted if a member does not receive a response to his clearance request from the continental office within 30 days of the continental office receiving his request.

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1. Clearance is valid for one year from the date granted, unless specified otherwise by the continental office issuing clearance. If a per son who has been cleared doesn't arrive to the country they are cleared to within this time period, they must reapply for clearance.

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2. Within 14 days upon receipt of a clearance request, the receiving continental office must respond to the applicant with a form letter/message receipt, acknowledging that their clearance request was received and including the date that the application arrived, which date begins the applicant's 30-day processing period.

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3. If the witnes sing road trip will stay less than 30 days in any three-month period in the prospective country, then a request for clearance is not required.

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a) If taking a road trip to a country in another continental area, or to a Sensitive Country, you must apply for clearance, even if the road trip will last less than 30 days.

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b) It is the road team's responsibility to determine if the city or metropolitan area in the country they are witnessing in has a CM Home(s) in it before they begin any witnessing activities in that city/metropolis, and if there is, to first receive permission from the local Homes to witness in the city or metropolis.

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       You have the right to move to other countries, either within your CRO area or in another CRO area, provided you receive clearance. (See Clearance Request Form in Appendix B.) The Member Evaluation Form has now been discontinued. All clearance applications now only need to include the application form and a Want Ad, un less the applicant wants to open their own new Home in a city presently without a Home, in which case only the Clearance Request Form is needed to apply for clearance.

       You must also receive clearance for a road trip to a sensitive country or a country in another continental area, or a road trip to a country in your own continental area that will last longer than 30 days in a three-month period.

       Except in the case of sensitive countries, clearance is considered automatically granted unless th e continental office replies within 30 days of receiving the clearance application.

       This clause deals with moving to another country. If you are temporarily going to another area to visit relatives, for visa purposes, or for legal business, it isn't necessary to ask for clearance. It would, however, be considerate to notify the appropriate continental offices that you will be in the area.

4. The continental office cannot deny clearance to any voting member and their immediate family who wis h to return to the country to which the voting member holds a passport. The continental office cannot guarantee acceptance in a Home upon arrival, and normal procedures for joining existing Homes apply.

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       The continental office cannot deny clearance to a member, nor their mate or children, who want to return to their home country. So if you are British, with an American mate, and you are planning to leave your mission field in India to return to Britain or the United States, then th e continental office cannot deny you clearance. However, you must notify the continental office by submitting your clearance request form. In this case, your clearance request form serves as a notification of intent, and since you are automatically cleared, you do not need to wait for a response from the CRO before moving to your home country. You must also follow normal Charter procedures for joining or opening a Home, including opening a Home in a city that already has a Charter Home.

       If y ou're returning from the mission field to a home field, "... don't expect to land unexpectedly on another Home's doorstep and be taken in, unless you've made arrangements with that Home ahead of time" (ML #1643:117).

       To add to the above scenario, if the British-American couple described above have a child born in Brazil who is issued a Brazilian passport, the couple and their children would not be eligible for "automatic clearance" to Brazil since the child is not a "voting member." (However , once the child reaches 16 years of age, he would then be eligible for "automatic clearance" to Brazil, although his parents would not. In addition, if the teen holds a U.S. and/or British passport, then he would be eligible for automatic clearance for Britain and/or the U.S.)

       The intent of this clause is to allow members to return to their home country. In the case of Europeans with EU passports, this "automatic clearance" only applies to going to the member's home country.

       The Right of Mo bility has set forth the proper methods for moving out of a Home, but this in no way is meant to apply to temporary movement. There will be occasions when someone will want to visit another Home for a period of time, in order to perhaps visit loved ones, or to help the Home in some way. Decisions regarding such matters are to be decided upon by the Homes involved. It is our hope that the Homes will continue to welcome Family members with open arms who wish to visit for whatever reason. By the sa me token, if your Home has someone who is gifted with some talent, such as an excellent handyman, and another Home temporarily needs his services, we trust that your two Homes will be able to lovingly arrange to let him go to help.

5. RIGHT OF REDRESS

       The definition of redress is: "To set right, to remedy or rectify," or "the satisfaction for wrong or injury." This Right of Redress section is included in the Charter so that if and when your or someone else's individual rights are infringed upon, you can report it and expect some disciplinary measures to take place against those who have caused harm. The Right of Redress went into effect from April 1, 1995, and only covers situations that occur from that time onward.

A. Members whose rights are infringed upon, and those who observe the rights of others being infringed upon, which may result in physical, spiritual, mental or emotional harm, have the right and responsibility to first bring the matter before both the person causing the harm, then the Home's officers, and if deemed necessary, before all voting members of the Home, with the expectation that within a reasonable amount of time the matter will be remedied.

       Jesus said, "Moreover, if thy brother shall trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone: if he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother. But if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established. And if he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church" (Matthew 18:15-17).

       If your rights are being infringed upon, you have the right to speak up about it and to expect it to be remedied. If you see someone els e's rights being infringed upon, you have both the right and the responsibility to report it as well.

       First, in Scriptural fashion, you are to bring up the matter to the person who's doing it, and then, if that doesn't rectify the situation, you should bring it up to your Home teamwork. There may be times when you don't feel you can bring the matter up directly to the person, in which case you can seek help from the Home teamwork. If the situation is serious enough, or the erring member doesn' t change his ways within a reasonable amount of time, the teamwork should bring the matter before all the voting members of the Home.

       A "reasonable amount of time" depends on what the infringement is and what the harm is. If, for example, you see that someone is verbally abusing another member and shouting at them, then a reasonable amount of time for that to be remedied is immediately! Whereas if the business teamworker on your Home teamwork has not been informing the Home of the financial st ate well enough, and a member of the Home feels that he isn't being kept informed, which he has the right to be, he can bring it up to the teamworker, as well as to the Home and say, "I think we need to be informed better, so we need to have a council meeting to discuss finances." In that case a reasonable amount of time might be a few days or even a week. It depends on the problem, how serious it is, and whether or not it's causing harm.

       As mentioned earlier, the Right of Redress is not only a personal right, but you are also expected to be your brother's keeper. For example, if a teen in your Home is put on silence restriction for two weeks, which is against the Child Discipline Rules and thus an infringement of his rights, you have not only the right to speak up, but also the responsibility to do so, and if you don't you will be held responsible, and you may also be subject to some discipline.

       "Failure to report a crime is a crime" (ML #662:22; DB7).

       Jesus gave the pattern a nd the method and the procedure just as clear-cut as could be from the very beginning! He said first of all somebody should warn'm that they're misbehaving. If they won't listen to that person, then take two or three witnesses with you and say it again before witnesses. And if they still won't listen to the two or three witnesses, He says take them before the congregation (ML #1880:24).

1. If the matter is not remedied within a reasonable amount of time, or is deemed extremely serious, the me mber has the right, and the responsibility, to send a message or letter formally requesting discipline of those who have caused the harm.

a) Such requests must be sent to the appropriate area and continental offices.

(1) Such requests may also be sent to Maria and Peter if so desired.

       If you feel the situation is very serious, or if it is not taken care of after you have followed the steps outlined above, then you can take the next step of informing the area and continental office of the situation. You should send a report by mail or modem as soon as possible. If you want to send a copy to Maria, you may.

       (Maria: If you are persuaded that your superior is wrong, are you ever obligated to report to an even higher authority?) Well, if there is a higher authority to make an appeal to, yes, of course.—If there is a higher authority to whom you can appeal and bring your question and say, "I don't think this is right" (ML #849:44).

       If you are personally convinced that somethin g is really wrong with your leader's actions or orders, and that God's work is being damaged or His sheep are being abused, mistreated or hurt as a result, then it is your duty to report it to a higher authority! Remember the old saying, "Failure to report a crime is a crime!" (ML #2417:17.)

2. The area office that receives such a request must speedily investigate the matter.

a) If, through investigation, confirmation is made that the rights of the member have been infringed upon, resultin g in physical, spiritual, mental or emotional harm, appropriate and proportionate discipline must be assigned to the offending member(s). The offended member, and those who reported the offense, must be informed of the action taken.

b) If, through investigation, it is found that the entire Home was negligent in protecting the rights of the member, the entire Home must be appropriately and proportionately disciplined; the offended member, and those who reported the offense, must be informed of the action taken.

c) If, through investigation, it is decided that the member's rights have not been infringed upon, the area office must inform the member who alleged he was offended as well as those who reported the matter.

       If someone is found to be causing harm, then some discipline must be meted out. The discipline should be appropriate and proportionate to the offense. Depending on what they did and how much harm they caused, they could be admonished or given some form of minor discip line, or put on Probationary Status, or moved to Fellow Member status, or be excommunicated.

       If someone consistently fails to follow the Child Discipline Rules with their children, or is mean and unkind towards other Home members, then strong disciplinary measures, such as Probationary Status or transfer to Fellow Member status, would have to be meted out. On the other hand, if it were just a minor offense, then the discipline wouldn't have to be so severe. But the offended member and any othe rs who reported it must be informed that discipline was taken. Likewise, they must be informed if the investigation proves that the alleged offender was found not to be at fault.

       Consider an example of the teen being isolated longer than is allowed in the "Family Discipline Guidelines": In such a case the whole Home would have been aware of the action and would have known it was not permitted, which makes them all responsible for the infringement. In such a case the Home may need to be put on Probationary Notice. In another instance, in which the offense is not so serious, a public apology by the shepherds and the Home might be enough.

       We once again come back to the fact that we are each responsible and accountable for our actions. We are also responsible for the actions of our Home.

       Dealing with personal problems and sorting out complicated situations by correspondence is very difficult. We can give general guidelines, but it often requires physical on-the-spot intervention to ferret out deep-seated problems (ML #2024:4).

6. RESPONSIBILITIES OF PARENTS

       The Family believes that children are a gift from God, given to their parents to love, care for, and to raise in a Godly manner. Primary responsibility for the welfare of children rests with their parents. But because of our faith and cooperative lifestyle, the raising of Family children is also a community affair, as parents share the child-rearing duties together with others in the Home. The members of the Home participate in the upbringing of the children , and as such also have a responsibility for their welfare and are responsible to help love and care for the children. The final decision concerning the welfare of the children rests with their parents. Each Home has a responsibility to support its parents and provide an environment where both the parents and the Home can meet their responsibilities towards their children, both individually and communally.

       As Dad so clearly stated in "One Wife" (ML #249), we are all responsible for the care of our Family children and we need to treat each of them as if they were our own. We are all responsible for each child and we must each endeavor to help our children in every way we can. The raising of the children in our Homes is a united effort, and everyone is involved in some way or another.

       However, since the Lord gave children to specific parents, the primary responsibility for them rests with the parents. This doesn't mean that they must be the ones who take care of them the most, but the final responsibility rests with the parents to make sure that their children are getting the care they need. If some child is not getting proper care, perhaps the Home is being negligent and thus is partly to blame, but the ultimate blame rests with the parents, as they must ensure that their children are being properly cared for, and if they're not, they should try to remedy the situation or move to some other situation where the children will be well cared for.

       This does not mean that pa rents are now supposed to set their own childcare standards in each Home. As with everything, the methods and manner of raising children within the Home are to be decided by the Home's voting members, and parents are expected to comply with majority decisions (these decisions must not be contrary to the Charter). If the parents don't agree, they can try to get the Home to change the way they do things through discussion and vote, or they can move to a Home that operates more to their liking.

       When God gives you children, then your first duty to God is to those children! That is God's work! (ML #835-4:70).

       Our Family children belong to all of us and we're all responsible for them (ML #1707:14).

       So get together, decide what behavior and house rules need to be made, agree upon them and then enforce them. The main key is to get everyone in the Home together on it, make the rules together and agree together, because it's very hard to live together and have your children grow up in ha rmony if everyone doesn't train and discipline the children in the same way. You should be able to get together, agree to some guidelines according to the Letters, and be consistent! (ML #1707:21).

Each parent or guardian of children in the Family is responsible to:

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A. Raise their children in a Godly manner according to the spirit of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and as outlined in the "Fundamental Family Rules," and to give them knowledge of God through His Word.

B. Love, care for, and to the best of their ability supply their children's physical, spiritual, emotional and disciplinary needs.

C. Protect their children from all forms of abuse—physical, sexual, spiritual, mental, emotional or psychological.

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D. Provide training and sufficient opportunity for their children to witness and share God's love and message of salvation. (See also, Rights of Children, E.)

E. See to it that their children are properly and sufficiently educate d scholastically, physically, emotionally and spiritually, on an ongoing basis.

       Although it is the responsibility of the Home to make sure that all of the children in the Home are raised in a Godly manner, loved and have all of their needs met, are protected from all forms of abuse and receive a proper education, it is ultimately the parents' responsibility to ensure their children's well-being.

       If the Home has poor schooling or no Word time for the children, or they don't allot time for get -out on a regular basis, then it's up to the parents to speak up in an attempt to change the Home, or to move to another Home. If the Home is not living up to the Charter standard in the care of the children, the parents can first explain to the teamwork and the Home that they feel the rights of their children are being violated, and that according to the Right of Redress something needs to be done. If nothing changes, they can seek the help of their VSs or they can move to another Home.

F. E nsure that sufficient academic records of their children's educational progress are kept.

       All school-age children in the Family should have academic records kept up to date. Besides being proof of the children's schooling and educational ability, it will also ensure that, should the parents and their children change Homes in the future, those who would help in their schooling will know exactly what the children have learned, so that the children will be able to continue their schooling at thei r present level. The basic records that need to be kept for children's home schooling, no matter what program they are using, are: (1) attendance record; (2) a log of scholastic activities; and (3) each student's portfolio, made up of selected school work plus photos and records, etc., of other educational activities. The Progress Reports and Cumulative Record Cards, which are available in the Home Schooling Kit, are optional.

       This doesn't mean that each parent must personally fill out all of their children's home schooling academic records, but that it is their responsibility to make sure that someone is doing it. If the teachers or caregivers aren't, or can't do it, then the parents will have to do it themselves. It is the parents who have the ultimate responsibility for their children's education, and are the ones responsible to ensure that such records are kept regularly.

       Parents should inform themselves of the education laws of the country in which they reside, as some countri es may require that home-schooled children be tested or meet other requirements.

       When we take them out of the System, and out of public education, we promise to educate them ourselves, and we have to do it! If we don't, then that is worse than if we had left them where at least the System would have taught them something (FSM 122, page 14).

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G. Ensure that needed medical care is supplied. This would include eye and dental check-ups for children four years of age and older, prefe rably on an annual basis.

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       It is recommended that by the time children begin reading they be taken for an eye check-up to ensure that they don't need glasses. Although we recommend those four years and older begin getting check-ups regularly, there may be situations where you as a parent may want to take your child in for a check-up at an even earlier age. This would depend on your child's need. The goal of this clause is to attempt to ensure that our children's physical needs are being met.

       Understandably there may be situations where it might not be advisable or possible to take your kids in for annual check-ups, where the local dental or eye care may be unacceptable or inaccessible for one reason or another.

       We also recommend that if, when getting a dentist or eye doctor's opinion on your child's teeth or eyes, you are unsure of the diagnosis, you seek a confirmation or second opinion. Some doctors can tend to paint the picture blacker than it really is and make yo u feel like you have to go through with what they are prescribing, when often it may be just a matter of business for them, or their personal feelings on the matter. Likewise, some may be too casual or wrong in not noticing something that needs to be taken care of promptly. It is important to make these decisions prayerfully and in counsel with your Home.

       All of these parental responsibilities are also listed as Home responsibilities later on in the Charter. The Home is expected to supply need ed medical care and eye and dental check-ups. But if the Home isn't doing so, then it is again the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children get the proper care they need. If this care cannot be supplied by their Home, then it is the parents' obligation to move to a Home in which it can be supplied.

       The care of our Family children is the responsibility of us all, and we must unitedly do all we can to properly care for them. Stating that children's school records, medical need s, etc., are the parents' ultimate responsibility doesn't mean that the Home members should think, "Well, since it's the parents' responsibility, we don't have to concern ourselves with raising the finances to meet these needs, as the parents have to take care of it." We are merely stating that the final responsibility rests with the parents.

       Parents or guardians should keep health and medical records for each of their children. (For sample forms, see "Heavenly Helpers 2," pgs.134-135, or the Student Health Record in the "Home Schooling Program.")

       They are the children of the Family, therefore the entire Family is responsible for them, not just those that happen to be their physical parents (ML #688:48).

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H. Discipline their children according to the standard agreed upon by the voting members of the Home in which they reside, providing it is in accordance with the Child Discipline Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules" and more fully expounded in "Family Discipline Guidelines" (ML #2919). Take appropriate action in disciplining their children whose behavior has become a reproach to the cause of Christ and/or reflects negatively on the Family.

       Since we live communally and we all play a part in the care of our children, it is necessary that discipline of the children be administered according to a united disciplinary standard. The "Family Discipline Guidelines" (ML #2919, GN 591), which is summarized in Appendix E. was written to offer assistance to this e nd.

       In each Home the voting members must decide their Home's disciplinary standard within the boundaries set by the "Family Discipline Guidelines." Once this is agreed upon by the Home, the parents should wholeheartedly attempt to discipline their children accordingly if they wish to remain a part of that Home.

       No one is permitted to discipline any child more severely than what is allowed in the "Family Discipline Guidelines." If they do, they will be violating the rights of the child and th e "Fundamental Family Rules," and will be in jeopardy of losing their Charter Member status.

       The Home decides unitedly how its children are to be disciplined if they engage in a certain activity or manifest certain inappropriate behavior. Therefore when they are in the care of their parents and engage in that activity or manifest inappropriate behavior, it is the parents' responsibility to discipline their children accordingly. This will ensure that there will be equality in the discipline of all of the children in the Home.

       If parents do not like the disciplinary standard that the Home has voted on, then it's their responsibility to try to change it, or move to a Home where they are in agreement with the Home's disciplinary standard, or start their own Home.

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       The parents are also responsible to take action in disciplining their children who commit dangerous or illegal offenses which are a reproach to the Family, such as smoking, shoplifting, continual use of foul lan guage, etc. Repeated failure by the parents to take action to improve the children's behavior may jeopardize their Charter Member status.

       There should always be a united effort between the parents and childcare workers to help the kids. It's the childcare helpers who often know the most about the child's needs, and our parents should be open to their counsel and advice, and be willing to accept it and act on it (ML #2631:27).

       Lack of unity and cooperation between parents or among parents a nd teachers destroys any possibility of training and discipline (ML #1708:78).

       Not only the adults should agree to the rules, but you should give the kids some say-so too. Let them make their own rules within reason and decide what punishment they think they deserve if they disobey. But remember, kids are normally harder on themselves than you would be. Give the children a chance to speak up too, let them learn to help make decisions (ML #1707:7).

I. Supply the children with a current addre ss and/or a telephone number when living in a different location than the children, such as in the case of parents whom are separated.

       Parents must make sure their children know how to contact them if they're not residing in the same Home as their children, or if the parents are likely to be away for any significant length of time.

J. Inform their children of their rights and ensure that they are not being infringed upon.

       The parents should let their children know (at an appropriate age, probably by 6 years old) what their rights are under the Charter, so the children will know if their rights are being infringed upon. (See Rights of Children.)

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K. Properly counsel and guide their 16- and 17-year-old teenagers in matters regarding sexual activity. (See also Word Rules, D.)

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L. Grant or deny their 16- and 17-year-old teens permission to engage in sexual intercourse. (For further details see Sex and Affection Rules, E. 1.

7. RIGHTS OF PARENTS

Members who are parent(s) or guardian(s) of children in the Family have the right to:

A. Spend regular time with their children that reside in the same Home with them.

       Parent time and family day are requirements listed in the Required Meetings and Activities, G. and K. This is to ensure that parents living in the same Home with their children get to spend time with them on a regular basis.

       We're very busy most of the time, but we try to see Davidito at least o ne hour a day. He likes to see us and know that we still love him, and one hour a day we sit here reading him Bible stories or something (ML #687:19).

B. Live on the same premises as their children, unless:

1. The parents are separated or divorced, and residing apart, due to marital problems.

2. One parent chooses to live apart from their children in order to pursue a specialized ministry or calling, providing the other parent is in agreement and remains with the children.

a) Both pa rents can live apart from their children if they are members of World Services and there is a suitable guardian for the children.

3. Their teen, age 14 or 15, desires to live in another Home and their resident parent(s) are in agreement.

       Parents have the right to have their offspring under the age of 18 live in the same Home as they do, if they wish. Those 16 and 17 have the Right of Mobility only if they have permission from at least one of their parents. (See Right of Mobility, A. 1. b), for rules governing 16- and 17-year-olds.) Those 14 and 15 do not have the Right of Mobility. Nevertheless, if they express the desire to live in another Home, and their resident parent(s) gives permission, they may do so; providing the receiving Home is also in agreement, of course.

       A parent can choose to live apart from his or her children if involved in some specialized ministry or calling that would necessitate their living apart from their children, but they can't be required to live apar t. There may be times when one parent may need to be away from his or her mate and children in order to fulfill some mission or calling from the Lord, such as serving in a dangerous or distant mission field, or one which would be unsuitable for children. Or the parent may have gifts and talents that are needed in a special situation, such as a Service Home which for some reason would not be able to receive children. In such cases, the decision to live apart from their children would be made by t he parent, in consultation with their mate and, if possible, with their children.

       The only exception to this is if the parents are permanently separated and have worked out a custody arrangement between themselves, and one parent may not be living with some, or any, of their children. In such a case, one parent can't demand to live with the children that are in the custody of the other parent. Marital separations are covered more fully in the Permanent Marital Separation Rules.

       In the rare e vent that both parents are away from their underage children for any significant length of time, they should give written permission to someone in the Home to act as the temporary guardian in their absence, authorizing them to decide in case of emergency medical matters.

       Every parent who has a child in our Family had either better be in the Family and have the child with them.—Or, if the child is temporarily staying with others, they'd better have a written legal document of some kind showi ng that the family that is keeping the child has written legal permission to have him! (ML #2496:71.)

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C. Be consulted and agree to any disciplinary action for Charter infractions committed by their resident children.

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       Children under the age of 16 are legally under the jurisdiction of their parent(s) or guardian(s), and it is the right and responsibility of the parent(s) or guardian(s) to require their child to abide by the Charter. This being the case, failure on th e child's part to live by the Charter would result in the child being disciplined in accordance with the discipline rules by the parents or others with the agreement of the parent(s) or guardian(s).

D. Be kept informed of the location, have a current address and/or telephone number, and have contact with their children who do not reside in the same Home as the parent(s).

       Parents who have children that live in other Homes, cities or countries have the right to know where they are and to have contact with them.

E. Be kept informed, on a regular basis, of the spiritual, physical and educational well being of their children under the age of 18.

1. For parent(s) residing with their children, "regular basis" is determined by a simple majority vote of the Home.

2. For parent(s) not residing with their children, "regular basis" is not less than once during every three-month period.

       Parents are entitled to know the physical, spiritual and educational well being of each of their children, and they should be informed of such on a regular basis. If they live in the same Home as their children, this is unlikely to be a problem as they will be living with their children and will regularly see and talk with those caring for and teaching their children, if they are not doing it themselves. They will already be having regular parent time and family days, and they will be attending the required childcare/parenting meetings. For those parents living in the same Home with their c hildren, the minimum "regular basis" is decided on by the Home's voting members.

       Parents residing with their children can at any time, of course, ask the child's teacher or caregiver about their children's welfare and progress. However, certain activities such as going over the children's records and discussing their schoolwork would probably be scheduled by the Home during Childcare/Parenting meetings. Hopefully, with smaller Homes, it will be easier for the parents to be in touch and kept we ll informed on how their children are doing, since many of them will likely be playing a larger role in the care of their children.

       If the child lives in a different Home than the parents, the parents must be informed of the overall state of their child no less than once every three months. (See Child Progress Report Form in Appendix B.) This is the minimum; it can't be less than that, but it can be more if the parent works out a mutually acceptable arrangement with those in the Home where the child is living. It would be desirable for the child and parents to correspond with each other once a month, if possible.

       If the teen or child is going through a difficult period, or in the case of a serious sickness or accident, we would, of course, encourage more frequent communication with the parents, if possible, to gain their needed prayer, support and counsel.

F. Receive sufficient assistance, within the abilities, resources and available manpower of the Home in which they reside, i n the physical and spiritual care and education of their children. "Sufficient assistance" is determined by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members.

       Every Family parent is entitled to receive help from their Home in the physical, spiritual and educational care of their children. The Home must decide, by a two-thirds majority, what constitutes "sufficient assistance" in their Home, and the extent of the help that is possible for the Home to provide. For example, the parent might feel that sufficient assistance is having someone take care of their children full-time and that they are only responsible for them at Parent time. The Home may look at it much differently. It is up to the Home's voting members to discuss and determine what assistance they can give.

       Sufficient assistance might not be equal in every case. For example, someone who is on full-time outreach or is away from the Home on a road trip may need more childcare help than the person who is at the Home all day. Or a single parent may be assigned a teen helper to assist them during Parent time, or a Parenting teamwork situation worked out for them, if possible. Each situation will have to be worked out by the Home, and in doing so, the main consideration must be the welfare of the children.

       Though our children, of course, have only one set of natural parents, they can have many spiritual parents. All of us can play some part in their spiritual parenting. ... Once we establish that these children be long to all of us and God holds us all responsible, regardless of who physically bore them, we'll have a little more to work with, a few more people to work with, and we won't be giving all the responsibility—physical, intellectual and spiritual—to only the flesh parents. ... Everyone needs to take the responsibility for our children, we all need to be assigned specific responsibilities for our children (ML #2670:14,15,30).

       If the parents are busy and they've got a lot of other responsibilit ies and they can't be taking care of their own children all the time, they should have workers to help them, like we do (ML #688:25).

1. Special attention must be paid to the needs of single parents and their children, so that the children of single parents are treated with the same care as children having two parents.

       The Bible says, "Honor widows that are widows indeed. Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, a nd to keep himself unspotted from the World" (1 Timothy 5:3; James 1:27).

       Our single parents, especially single moms, are our widows. Many of them no longer have their mates for one reason or another, and that in itself is a traumatic experience. Besides overcoming their loss, and the battles that accompany it, they must adjust to being a single parent, which is very difficult.

       Other women are single moms because they bravely, lovingly, sacrificially and willingly shared with either outsider s or Family men during the FFing days. They laid down their lives for the brethren. They obeyed the Lord, gave of themselves, and were blessed with a precious child. As with all of our Family children, we are all responsible to help care for them, and in the case of single parents we must do all we can to help make it easier for them to raise their children.

       Being a single parent is difficult in that you must be both father and mother to your children. Of course, it is much easier to be a sing le parent in the Family than out of the Family, as within the Family you have a great deal more help and support. But even with that help it is still difficult. Homes must therefore pay special attention to the needs of single parents and their children. The Home must do its best to make sure their need for assistance and additional care is met. This may mean finding someone in the Home who would be willing to assist as a parenting teamworker, who actively helps with the care of the children, an d who the single parent can counsel and work together with in the care of the children.

       A single parent is one who has children residing with them, but who does not have a mate living with them. Those who have children whose mate is away most of the time should receive the same consideration as a single parent.

       Single parents whose mates are not in the Family might want to consider giving legal guardianship to a Family couple in case of their death or debilitating injury.

       It is past time to commit ourselves to our dear Family, our dear single mothers and single fathers, and all of our dear children who need our help, our time, our attention, our love, our affection (ML #2953:6).

G. Make the decision on medical matters concerning their children.

       When a child is sick, the parents are to make the decision as to whether medical help is needed or not. The Home teamwork can counsel with the parents, and the Home can pray and hear from the Lord about the matter, but in the end, t he parents are the ones who have the final say. As voting members, we are assuming that 16- and 17-year-olds will make their own decisions regarding medical matters which affect them. However, in areas where this is not legal, if the teens are living away from their parents they should have a letter granting an adult member of the Home the authorization to act in place of the parents in case of any medical emergency.

       In a case where the parents are living away from their child and the child re quires serious medical attention, the guardians should make the immediate decision but should inform and counsel with the parents at the earliest possible opportunity, and continue to keep them informed.

H. Determine the amount of contact their children will have with non-Charter relatives.

       It is up to the parents to decide if and how much contact their children under the age of 16 will have with their non-Charter relatives. "Contact" covers both visitation and correspondence.

I. Read th e unsealed correspondence of their children under the age of 16, with the exception of letters to Maria and Peter or to their continental office.

       The parents can read the correspondence of their minor child if they wish. This doesn't mean they must read it, but that they reserve the right to. This covers both incoming and outgoing mail. However, the parents should not open their children's mail, but can ask the child if they can read it either before the letter has been sealed or after it has been opened. The exception to this is if the child is writing directly to the continental office or to Mama and Peter. Such letters should be confidential, if the child so desires.

8. RIGHTS OF CHILDREN

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       It's very important to clarify what rights our Family children have, so that everyone knows exactly what they must do to properly care for them. As Dad said, "Nothing is more important than God's children and their care, for they are His Kingdom!" (ML #315:30). This section covers the rights of those under the age of 16. Although those under the age of 16 do not have the same rights as voting members, it should be understood that as children get older they should be given a greater degree of personal autonomy. For instance, a 12- to 15-year-old child should be given more responsibility and freedom of choice than a 10-year-old, and likewise a 10-year-old greater than a 6-year-old. Once someone reaches age 16, they have the rights of a voting member, which are covered in the Basic Rights of Individual Members, unless specified otherwise in the Charter.

Children under the age of 16 have the right to:

A. Have their spiritual, physical and emotional needs met.

       I think that Sara and Dora have both tried to bring that out in their stories, how much care the children need—not just physical, they can even get along without some of that, but emotional and spiritual care they really need! Children need to know that they're important and that they really are loved and looked up to by somebody, just like everyone! (ML #1396:48.)

B. Be free from abuse of any kind—sexual, physical, spiritual, mental, emotional or psychological.

       We a re completely against any kind of child abuse, not only because of the System, but because we love our children, and to harm them in any way would be completely against our principles of love (ML #2835:62).

C. Privately and directly communicate, via mail, without hindrance, with Maria and Peter or their continental office at any time on any matter, and to have their letter sent, or to have the address supplied to them upon request.

D. Have time allotted on a regular basis for the reading o f the Bible and Family literature that is appropriate for the child's age.

       I consider that for our children right now, the best education you can possibly get is in the Word, in the Bible and in the MO Letters, and what God has said to us, told us, and prepared us for (ML #1036:43).

       Thank the Lord we have Jesus, the Bible and the Letters as our standard and guideline, and our children can be trained in the way that they should go!... Are you putting the Word and the Lord first in their lives and being an example of this yourself? (ML #1706:26,27.)

       We believe that our children's lives are very precious and therefore we put a special emphasis on teaching and training them in the "nurture and admonition of the Lord" (Ephesians 6:4). ... The education we give them is based and centered on God's Word and Godly principles (Maria #76:15).

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E. Engage in evangelism.

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       Although it is mandated in the Outreach Rules that those 16 years of age and above witness a minimal number of hours per week, this clause grants the right to all of our children, except those in behind-the-scenes WS exempted Homes, to engage in spreading the Gospel, if they so desire. While children have the right to witness, they cannot be forced to do so against their will. (For more on witnessing with children, please see the Responsibilities of Parents, D.

F. Sufficient time, opportunity and educational materials to receive an adequate education that allows them to become compe tent in a manner appropriate to their age, ability and aptitude, in the skills of reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, sciences, and other curricular subjects, including practical-life skills.

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1. Senior teens (ages 16 and 17) also have this right.

       All of our children have the right to an adequate education that allows them to become as competent as they should be for their age, in a variety of subjects. The definition of "adequate" is "sufficient to satisfy a requirement or meet a need." So they need to have an education that meets the need for them to become competent in these subjects in a manner appropriate for their age. Thus a six-year-old should be educated at least to the proper level for a six-year-old, taking into consideration their ability and aptitude. The minimum amount of school hours is listed in the Scholastic and Schedule Rules.

       If a child wishes to receive more education in a certain field of study, they may do so if their parents agree. It would be up to the child to explain their desire to the parents, and up to the parents to see if the Home can comply. If not, the parents will have to decide whether they want to move to a Home that can.

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       While not considered "children" under the Charter, senior teens also have the right to a sufficient education. They must also fulfill a minimum number of study hours per week, which varies depending on whether they have completed a junior high school curriculum or not. (See Scholastic and Schedule Rules for details.)

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       Those 18 and over may also continue their education by means of the CVC program, private study of other educational materials and resources, or outside school, classes or courses. (See Home Life Rules, J.)

       Lord, if we're not taking proper care and education of our children, we're not a very good sample or example to others, and could even be considered worse than an infidel, someone unfaithful to You, if we're unfaithful to our chil dren! (ML #2432:98.)

       You teens in the Family have a wonderful opportunity for vocational training. Many of you have already become secretaries, experts in childcare, expert maintenance men and handymen, video technicians, editors, writers, etc. Many of you have become virtual professionals in many important areas, and become fruitful and fulfilled at your jobs! You have your share of scholastics too, but you can have both scholastics and vocational training, and the right balance between the t wo (ML #2864:40).

G. Seek to obtain official certification for the schooling they receive, if they desire, and their parents agree, and/or if the parent's desire.

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1. Senior teens (ages 16 and 17) also have this right.

       If the child/teen wants to get local testing, such as the GED test in the U.S., which is a high school equivalency test, or whatever testing might be available, so that they can get credit for their home education, then they have the right to do so. If it's not p ossible for the Home to provide the means for the child to get such testing, then the parents are free to move with the child to another Home that can provide it.

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       While not considered "children" under the Charter, senior teens also have the right to obtain official certification for their home education by available testing.

       Those 18 and over may also obtain official certification for their education if they desire or feel it is necessary. As with attending school or outside cla sses, this is to be approved by the Home in accordance with Home Life Rules, J.

H. Have regular physical education, exercise and play in accordance with the Get-Out Rules.

       Get out in the fresh air and sunshine daily. I try to make sure everybody, including the children, does the same. We all need a little get-out time, exercise, recreation and happy, playful, just plain fun in the beautiful Creation of God in the garden of God outside! (ML #1362:206.)

I. Reside with their parents, or i f their parents are not residing together, with at least one of their parents.

1. Unless the parent(s) have chosen to become members of World Services, in which case the parents must assign a suitable guardian who will assume the Responsibilities of Parents for the child.

       Every Family child has the right to live with their parents, or at least one parent if their parents are not living together, if they wish to, with the exception of the few children who have both parents in WS. These cases are very rare, as WS generally does not accept couples without also taking in their children. WS generally only accepts those who are childless, or whose children are grown up, or who are separated from their mates; thus the children remain with the other mate.

       There are a few rare cases where both parents, or a single parent, are in WS without their children. In the rare instances where the children can't live with the parents, loving guardians who the children are comfortable with must be p rovided for the children. Power of Attorney papers must be given to the guardians.

       At any time when a parent is choosing, for whatever reason, whether to live away from his or her children, they should discuss and pray about the situation with their children, so that the children feel a part of the decision and have an understanding of what is going on. In the extremely rare instance of both parents being asked to join WS without the children, the children should be consulted about those being assigned as guardians.

       Any time a guardian is appointed, it should be someone the children love, trust and feel comfortable with. When possible, such guardianship should be made legal.

       In cases where the children do not agree with the parent(s) moving away from them, the parents are free to decide to turn down the position which is being offered to them.

       Although the children have the right to live with at least one of their parents, the children should understand that this does not neces sarily mean that they have the right to choose which parent they live with, as this is decided by the parents, though the views of the children should be sought and taken into consideration. In the case of a permanent marital separation, the parents will decide upon the division of the children, and once that decision is made, then the children will live with their respective parent unless further mutually agreed-upon arrangements are made. Such decisions should take the needs of the children in to consideration and should be made in the best interests of the children. (This is covered in more detail in the Permanent Marital Separation Rules.)

       If the parents are going to separate, even a temporary 3-month separation, they need to make sure to wisely and lovingly give some kind of explanation to the children (ML #2339:94).

       In the case of a division of the children between two fit and agreeing parents, both the preference of the children and of each of the parents should be taken in to consideration, and if possible an agreement should be reached between all in which both the parents and the children are as satisfied and as well cared for as possible (ML #359:8).

J. Maintain contact with the parent(s) who is not living with them. Each Home should facilitate such contact whenever practical.

1. Each child must be supplied with a current address to which they can send mail to their parent(s).

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2. Time must be allotted each month for the child to write his or her parent(s).

       If a child is living apart from his or her parent(s), they have the right to be in contact with them, and if not physically possible, at least by mail. They must know, or have available, an address to write their parents, and must feel the freedom to write them whenever they need or want to. The teamwork and those in the Home must understand that it is the child's right to have contact, and at the very least, be able to write their parents, so they must make time available for the child to do so. If practical and workable, children should be able to visit the absent Charter parent on occasion, though many factors would determine if this were practical.

       If as a parent you are living apart from your children, and your children write you, you should answer their letters, as it assures them of your love.

K. Have regular parent time and family days with their parent(s) and siblings who live on the premises, or with their foster parent(s) or guardian(s), in accordance with Required Meetings and Activities G. and K.

       Children are entitled to Parent time with their parents. If the Home is fulfilling the Required Meetings and Activities in the "Fundamental Family Rules," then children will be having the needed time with their parents, brothers, and sisters.

       One great advantage our children have is that their parents are able to spend much more time with them than most parents do (ML #2245).

       One thing we do to try to help Techi and David know they're speci al to us is we have them come in our room together for special fellowship every night (ML #1396:13).

       Besides the common problems that all children experience, most children are bound to have special problems, individual fears and individual worries at some time.—And taking personal time with them is the only way that I know of to let the kids really unburden their hearts, and for you to see where they're at so you can effectively address their problems. How else can you do that, but by spendi ng time with them? If you're going to get good results with your children and really help them get over their problems, you're simply going to have to make such time with them (ML #2631:10).

L. Receive needed medical attention.

       When a child needs medical attention, he has the right to receive it. The decision is to be made by the parent or guardian, in counsel with the child, if age-appropriate (see Rights of Parents, G.).

RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS OF THE CHARTER HOME

9. DEFINITION OF A CHARTER HOME

The Charter Home:

A. Abides by the minimum personnel requirements, in accordance with the Home Size Rules, A. in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       God bless you and help you to get it together in real unity—of one mind, one heart, one spirit, one body, one wife, a real cooperative Home with two or three loving couples together—working together, traveling together, serving together, sharing together, helping together, litnessing and witnessing together and really organized together in unity serving the Lord, helping each other. There's strength in unity!—Such a strength, such a bond, such a wonderful fellowship when you're all really one in the Lord and one in His fellowship and one in His service, one in His Word! (ML #1056:86).

B. Does not exceed maximum personnel limits, in accordance with the Home Size Rules published in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       A small Colony of only half-a-dozen [adults, plus their children] can in some c ases be even more effective and less trouble, less expense, safer and more mobile [than a larger Colony/ Home] and still contain all the necessary personnel and essential gifts needed in a small Colony, and is much easier to transport, house, feed, equip and care for (ML #329B:30).

       Medium-sized Co-ops are very advantageous!—Not the gigantic monstrosities, the horrible blobs of hundreds of members which we used to have—but I would say that Co-ops consisting of certainly two or more couples wi th their children are very advantageous when there are four or five or six adults who can have a number of different responsibilities, plus perhaps an equal or greater number of children (ML #1368:29).

C. Does not allow anyone to reside in the Home who is not a Charter Member or authorized guest.

1. A Charter Family Home may stay with non-Charter members for up to 30 days, and no more than 30 days in any 60-day period.

a) The continental office may grant exceptions if they feel it is wa rranted.

       The sub-clause also covers a situation when a Family friend or relative might invite an entire Home to live in his house with him, perhaps while the Home is in transition between moves, or on a special witnessing mission or whatever. A Home may do so for up to 30 days without CRO permission. The CRO may allow a Home to remain longer than 30 days if they feel it is warranted. In such a case the Home is responsible to maintain the security of their Charter pubs and other Family material s.

       This clause does not cover a Charter Member visiting relatives. The amount of time a Charter Member would remain with relatives depends, among other things, on the reason he is visiting them. The member and his Home prior to the visit should agree upon the timetable for such visits. The Home would then continue to report him as a member of their Home on their TRF. If the member does not return by the agreed-upon time, without suitable explanation, the Home would then remove the member from the population stats of the Home.

2. Non-Charter visitors may stay in a Charter Family Home for up to 30 days.

a) The continental office may grant exceptions in extraordinary circumstances.

b) Overnight non-Charter visitors who are minors must either accompany their parents or guardians or have written permission from a parent or legal guardian.

       The Home can allow Fellow Members, as well as non-Family visitors, to stay in the Home for up to 30 days; beyond that would require CRO permission. Due to legal reasons, any minors who are not Charter Members who stay overnight without their parents must have written permission from their parent(s) or guardian(s).

       Of course, the decision on who is allowed to stay in the Home as a visitor and for how long would be decided by a Home vote after prayerful consideration. Such visitors must not be permitted access to Charter pubs.

       We cannot accept underage children without written, and preferably notarized permission (ML #124:8).

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3. Teenagers who are no longer Charter Family Members, may, with approval of a majority of the Home's voting members and permission from their continental office, continue to temporarily reside in a Charter Home on guest status, provided they adhere to the following rules:

Refrain from activities that would reflect negatively on the Family, such as shoplifting.
Keep a clean and presentable appearance.
No smoking in the Home or on the property.
No substance abuse or use of illicit or illegal drugs.
No carrying weapons such as guns or knives with large blades.
No drinking for minors, or above the alcohol quota for those over 18, while in the Home.
No cursing or using foul language in the Home.
No violent behavior or harming of animals, humans or property.
No sexual activity with Charter Members.
No homosexual activities.
No continual public expression of criticism of the Family, the Word, or Family leadership.
No audible system music in communal areas o f the Home.
No ungodly videos or TV viewing in communal areas of the Home, including their bedroom if shared with others.
No ungodly books in public areas of the Home.
Not eligible for CM or CM/FM lit, unless the parents or teamwork wish to read certain Letters with him or her.
Must abide by all other rules or regulations set down for them by the Home council.

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       A Home cannot allow someone on guest status who is not a Charter Member to live in the Home permanently or for an extended period of time. However, exceptions can be granted by the CROs in the case where teens who have left the Family are temporarily living with their parents or other CM adults in order to help prepare them for life outside the Family, make the transition as smooth as possible, and help them get properly situated elsewhere. If the teens are not of legal age they might have to remain in the Home for a considerable amount of time until they are old enough to move out on their own.

       These non -CM Family teens should not be reported as Charter Members on the Home's TRF, but a formal request should be sent with the TRF seeking approval from the CRO Office for the non-Charter member to remain in the Home. They are not eligible to read the Home's CM mailings, have any sexual activity with Charter Members, etc.

       Those non-Charter members will not need to meet CM requirements, such as witnessing hours or other responsibilities of Charter Members on the HSEC. They must, however, agree to not break any of the rules listed above as well as any other rules or requirements set down for them to obey by their parents and the Home council of the Home in which they are residing.

D. Fulfills all sections of the Responsibilities of the Charter Home.

       The next four sections of the Charter list all of the Responsibilities of the Charter Home. Any Home that does not fulfill these responsibilities is in jeopardy of being placed on Probationary Notice, and ultimately its members could lose their Charter Member status.

10. BASIC RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME

The Charter Home:

A. Lives in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and obeys the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       Charter Homes, like Charter Members, are expected live in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and to obey the "Fundamental Family Rules." The definition of "endeavor" is "to make an earnest attempt." So a Charter Home must make a conscientious and concerted effort, an earnest attempt , to live in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and obey the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       In the "Fundamental Family Rules" it states that rules are to be obeyed at all times by everyone, with exceptions only in rare or unavoidable circumstances. There are times when it might not be possible to obey a rule, but these should be rare. xe "Violation of Charter/Rules:loss of If a Home persistently disregards the "Fundamental Family Rules," it will be placed on Probationary Notice, and its members will be in jeopardy of losing their Charter membership.

       Solid, qualified, bona fide Family members, whole-hearted, trustworthy, reliable, justifiable!—I don't want any other kind of Family members!... [We want] good people who really love the Lord and are really obedient and obeying God and me and the Family and the Family rules, and are doing the job! (ML #1730:82.)

B. Fulfills the reporting requirements, in accordance with World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules.

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       Homes must send in their TRF, tithe, and 1% FAF contribution on time each month, as well as their Home Self-Evaluation Checklist every six months, in accordance with the World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules listed in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       Your TRF report of your activities and how much you're witnessing and litnessing and soul-winning, etc., is just as important as your tithe, and we need to know how you're getting along and what you are accomplishing for t he Lord! We want to know your spiritual condition. You're one of our sheep of our pasture and we are your shepherds, and we want to make sure we are doing a good job of shepherding and feeding you, and that you're doing a good job as a sheep in not only grazing on our pastures, but also in producing wool and meat for the Master's use! If you want the [pubs] from us, get your report [TRF] and gift [tithe] in on time!!!—Or no mag! (ML #888:4; 886:PS.)

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C. Tithes to World Services a m inimum of 10% of its income as well as contributes a further 1% to the Family Aid Fund (FAF), and shares with World Services from its abundance through added gifts.

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       As the Bible and the Letters teach, the Lord expects His people to tithe. The tithe is 10% of all new cash income to the Home. (For details on what should be tithed, see FSM 331, "Answers to Your Tithing, FAF, HER, Pioneer Gift, and Home Loan Questions.") The minimum tithe is $100, except in some countries specifically granted exception by WS due to poor economic conditions. There is no $10 minimum on the FAF. It is simply 1% of the Home's total cash income for the month.

       In addition to tithing, the Lord indicates that He also expects His children to give offerings above their tithe. Malachi 3:8 says, "Will a man rob God? Yet you have robbed Me. But you say, wherein have we robbed Thee? In tithes and offerings." This passage indicates that the Lord not only said His people were robbing Him via the non-payme nt of their tithes, but also in the non-giving of freewill gifts and offerings when they had the financial capabilities of doing so, and so He wasn't blessing them.

       So besides tithing on its cash and monetary income, a Charter Home is expected to share of its abundance with World Services. If a Home receives a substantial abundance—for example, a Home member receives an inheritance—they are expected to lay it at the Apostles' feet in accordance with Acts 4:34 and 35. We're not indicating tha t the Home has to give all of its abundance, but that it shares the abundance. In such a case, World Services' practice has always been to suggest that the person who receives such a windfall use some of it for their personal needs, and/or for their Home and area needs, and then share as much as possible with World Services so that the whole Family can benefit from the Lord's supply.

       It is our belief that when the Lord supplies a large inheritance, gift or other windfall that He is generally g iving it not only in answer to the local Home's prayers, but also in answer to the worldwide Family's prayers for finances.—And that He is using the recipient of that gift to help supply the need of the whole work.

       Your tithe, according to God's Word, must come to us, your spiritual leadership, your modern Temple, World Services and its many Family Temple ministries. Your gifts above that may also come to us as your investment brokers for the Lord, to put them where we feel they're going to get the best dividends, the best returns, the best interest and accomplish the most, and where it's most needed ... and God will reward you accordingly (ML #928:258)

D. Regularly engages in evangelism.

       As explained in the Responsibilities of Individual Members, G. evangelism is "zealous preaching and dissemination of the Gospel, such as through missionary work." Every Home is expected to witness and preach the Gospel with zeal.

       Our job, the job that God has given to each of His childre n, is to give His Word and His Love to others, to preach the Gospel, to sow the seed, to witness!—That's what God has called us for. Jesus commanded His disciples to "Go ye into all the World, and preach the Gospel (Good News) to every creature" (Mark 16:15).—And we must likewise do the same. For "the harvest (of hungry, searching souls) truly is plenteous, but the laborers (the workers who will gather them in) are few" (Matthew 9:37). (ML #731:126.)

       [Witnessing] is not an option!—It's a co mmandment! (ML #144:17.)

       He won't bless any other area if you neglect the number one job we have to do, preach the Word, and number two, try to win those to whom we preach it (ML #697:51).

E. Endeavors to achieve the goals of the continental area, country and/or city in which the Home resides.

1. The goals of the continental area, country, and/or city cannot violate or contravene the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or the "Fundamental Family Rules," and can only be established b y:

a) A published World Services' directive, which specifically declares the goal.

       (or)

b) A Home referendum of the Homes affected, in accordance with the Election Rules.

(1) The continental office must inform WS leadership of the outcome of any Home referendum affecting continental areas or countries.

2. All area goals other than WS-suggested goals are subject to a vote of confirmation, in accordance with the Election Rules.

       All of the Homes within a continental area or a countr y or a city can have united goals that Homes in that particular area are expected to attempt to achieve. Such goals must not contravene the Charter or the "Fundamental Family Rules," so they can't take away any of the rights granted under the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights."

       There are only two ways such goals can be established:

       1.) The first is if WS publishes a directive that declares that the worldwide Family, or a certain area or city, must attempt to achieve a certain goal. On the rare occasion that World Services might make such a decree, they will publish it in writing, clearly stating that it is a worldwide, area, country or city goal. In other words, if WS issues such a decree, it will not be ambiguous. No one will be able to erroneously come up to you and say that you "must do such-and-such because it is a WS-declared area goal" unless such a goal has been clearly stated as such in a written publication.

       2.) The second method for establishing such a goal, and t he method that will most commonly be used, is through a Home referendum. The rules governing Home referendums are listed under the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       This means that other than a WS-established goal, an area goal cannot be established without a vote of the Homes affected. Once the majority of the Homes in an area, country or city agree that a measure should become a goal, then all the Homes in the area, country or city are expected to endeavor to achieve it.

       So if an area wants to have a united project, or a "push," that everyone is expected to participate in, it must first be confirmed in a Home referendum as an area goal.

       One example would be the 3% donation that many Homes in various areas donate to the local Common Pot to cover local area expenses. For the most part, this plan has proven to be very beneficial. Any continental area, country or city wishing to continue or to implement such giving to the local Common Pot would need to receive the H omes' agreement through a Home referendum. In the Home referendum section of the Election Rules it explains that Home referendums on financial matters are established only by a two-thirds majority of the area Homes. So in the case of the donation to the local Common Pot, two-thirds of the Homes must agree before it becomes an area goal.—Whereas in non-financial matters, such as matters like coordinating witnessing areas within a given metropolitan area, a simple majority is the criterion.

       All continental, area and country goals other than WS-suggested goals are subject to a vote of confirmation, which should be organized every six months, according to the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       Decisions which affect other Colonies in an area should not be made without consultation with them, either getting their vote by phone, or [a] meeting (ML #297:80).

       Please be prayerful about any new changes, and counsel and pray with those in your Home or in your fellowship ar ea, as well as with your [CROs], about any major policy changes (Maria #83:13).

F. Allocates time on the specified election dates for its members to prayerfully elect competent Home officers, in free and fair elections by secret ballot, in accordance with the Election Rules.

       For details on the dates for Home teamwork elections, please see the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       Each Home is supposed to have regular teamwork elections, but to help you make sure that these e lections take place, we are requiring them to be held on [specific] dates (ML #2865:68).

G. Can make Home regulations by a simple majority, which Home members agree to abide by.

       The voting members of the Home can vote to establish Home regulations which they feel are necessary for the functioning of their Home. Examples of Home regulations could include the Home schedule, inside/outside shoes, usage of certain equipment in the Home, etc. There are numerous Letters and other pubs that give g uidance on all aspects of Family life that the Home may want to implement by making them Home regulations.

       Once such matters have been discussed and voted in by a majority vote of the Home's voting members, these Home regulations must be adhered to by the Home members. (A Home does, of course, have the right to modify or drop such Home regulations at any time, if the majority of the Home agrees.) A list of the Home's regulations should be kept in the Home library for reference.

       From now on , every local Home shall immediately form a Home council of its total membership of Leadership and LTs and staff, except babes, chaired by the Home shepherd. ... The Home council shall make these decisions and establish the rules of the Home ... by at least a majority vote on each issue (ML #329B:1,3; DB6).

       I like you to run yourselves, so to speak, and take care of your own administration, take care of your own schedules and work and jobs and duties and all of this sort of thing. Because that 's part of your training as leaders, to learn to make your own decisions about those matters that affect you and others (ML #2234:13).

H. Allocates sufficient and regular time for all required Home meetings as listed in the Required Meetings and Activities.

       Please refer to the Required Meetings and Activities section of the "Fundamental Family Rules" for what is required in the way of meetings and activities. As you will notice, these meetings and activities have been derived from the DTR r equirements.

       Homes should have daily Home meetings and/or devotions together and ... business meetings to decide Home business (ML #329B:2; DB6).

I. Works in harmony with other Homes in the continental area, country or city.

       Homes within a city, country or continental area are expected to work in harmony with each other. It is inevitable that there will occasionally be problems between Homes, which will need to be worked out, but when there are, it is expected that they will be prayerfu lly, lovingly and unselfishly resolved between the Homes involved. If necessary, arbitration of problems may need to involve the VS or CRO.

       For God's sake and your own sake and His work's sake and even the World's sake, please work together so that you may be found worthy of those greater responsibilities of His coming Kingdom on Earth, and that you may learn the lessons now that you will need to know in the days to come when you will be needed to rule the whole World (ML #1209:88).

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J. Participates in at least one city council meeting during any given two-month period, if located in a city or metropolitan area with more than one Charter Home.

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1. It is the responsibility of the city council chairperson to see that a written record of all city council decisions is kept, and made available to the area office upon request. The chairperson is also responsible to pass any meeting notes on to the next chairperson when he leaves this post.

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       In orde r to coordinate their witnessing, provisioning and other activities, and to promote harmony and cooperation between Homes, every city or metropolitan area that has more than one Charter Home must form a city council. Preferably city council meetings should be held monthly, but are required at least every two months. Every Home in the city is required to send a representative to at least one city council meeting in a given two month period. The chairperson is responsible to see that written notes are kept of all decisions made at city council meetings.

       We trust you'll appreciate the fellowship that these city council meetings offer, and that just being able to pray together, sing a few songs together, share some positive uplifting testimonies and how-to's, as well as relax together and have a time to chat with others in the area will be very beneficial, even if no business matters and city coordination are discussed in the initial meeting or two held in a city where the city council i s just starting off.

K. Refrains from engaging in activities that reflect negatively on other Homes in their continental area or country or on the Family in general.

       The customs and mores of society vary from country to country, so something that is acceptable in one country may not be acceptable in another. Homes therefore need to be sensitive to the customs and values of the country in which they reside, and should try not to engage in activities that are considered offensive. By engaging in unacceptable behavior, a Home's actions could reflect negatively on the other Homes in the city, country or continental area, or the Family in general. In such a case, a Home would be expected to refrain from the activity, or face appropriate discipline from the VS or CRO. Depending on the offense, the discipline may range from an admonition to the Home to being placed on Probationary Notice.

       We ought to conduct ourselves in these countries in such a fashion that the people of the countr y and its officials will be proud to have us there and thankful for us because we're doing their country good (ML #1202:41).

       [You] need to learn something about the culture and the customs ... and their dress and all that sort of thing, their taboos. You don't want to offend them with certain things, even foods, etc. ... [You need to know] the general culture and customs and mores of the people, how you should dress and not dress, what offends them and doesn't, and what to say and not to say.- -What to do and not do in polite society, in other words, or even on the common street what is expected (ML #1214:73,74).

L. Informs and seeks counsel from their continental office before participating in national, international or other major media interviews, documentaries, movies, books, written rebuttals, press releases or articles in the name of the Family.

1. The continental office may give prior authorization to specific spokespersons to conduct media interviews and/or write rebutta ls or press releases without first informing or counseling with the continental office.

       (or:)

2. The continental office may give prior authorization to specific spokespersons to conduct media interviews and/or write rebuttals or press releases without first informing or counseling with the continental office, on the understanding that the spokesperson will first counsel with specified area officers.

       Dealing with the media can be a very tricky and precarious matter, and it can have serious repercussions if mishandled. This clause is included to ensure that Homes counsel with their CROs before becoming involved in any major media interaction. This includes any media that will affect the whole country ("national") or other countries ("international") or any other "major media interviews." It covers media outreach that is conducted in the name of the Family, or in the name of a local work that is known as the Family. (For example, the 21st Century School, the official name of the HC S, is well known to be the Family.)

       If the media interview is a local affair—for example, if the local newspaper wants to do an article on your Home's "Consider the Poor" outreach—this would not fall under the definition of "national, international or major," and therefore would not require the Home to seek prior counsel and approval from the continental office. (If, however, you live in a major city, and the "local newspaper" is published nationally, then you would need to check with your c ontinental office before granting the interview, since such an article could have national ramifications.)

       If a major or national newspaper wants to do a two-page spread about the Family, it would be considered a major article and thus would have to be counseled about with your continental office.

       If the local TV station wants to film your children's singing group, it would be fine for the Home to go ahead with it as a local decision, but if a national or international TV or radio station wa s requesting permission to film a documentary or TV show or movie, then it would have to be counseled about beforehand.

       There are times when national or international interviews must be given on the spot. An example of this was when the Argentina raids took place and the press immediately began banging on the door of the Media Home in England, wanting their response. There was no time for the media spokesmen there to get permission from the CRO to speak to the media; they had to go on the atta ck right away. To cover such situations, there is a provision allowing the CROs to appoint specific media spokespersons who are authorized to speak to major media outlets without first consulting the CRO. However, this advance authorization does not cover undertaking the filming of documentaries or movies, or major, in-depth magazine or newspaper articles, or writing or collaborating with those writing books about the Family, without first consulting with the CROs.

       We have attempted to outline situations where there is sufficient time to consider counseling about such media decisions. However, in a case of extreme emergency when there isn't time, such as your Home being raided as were the Homes in Australia, France and Argentina, you would probably need to immediately speak to the press without awaiting CRO approval. If such is the case, you should proceed as you feel led of the Lord, and inform your CRO as soon as possible afterwards.

       Under non-emergency conditions, if a major med ia outlet representative were to arrive at your door for an interview, and your CRO has not appointed anyone in your Home who is authorized to speak with the major media without first checking with the CRO, then your response to them should be to politely direct the inquirer to the main media spokesperson for the country, much like an employee of a company would if questioned about their company. (This would not be the case if your Home had just been raided, as outlined above.) It is advised tha t each Home have a phone number where the main media spokesperson for the country or area can be reached. If you give the phone number of the media spokesperson to someone, you should inform your media spokesperson as soon as possible.

M. Obtains written permission from their continental office before engaging in any verbal or written legal agreements in the name of the Family, Family entities, or any Family authorized companies, or acting as an official representative, other than sales repre sentative, of any Family publications, productions, or companies.

       As a Family member, you represent the Family to those to whom you witness and minister. However, when it comes to legal agreements involving the Family, or Family authorized companies, only those authorized to represent the Family in legal matters have the authority to act. Such authority must be granted, in writing, by the CRO after consultation with WS leadership.

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       It is important to realize when representing the Family or one of the Family authorized companies, that you do not give any implied consensual (verbal) agreement to some other company or producer, for example, who may want to help promote or sell our products, without first getting counsel from your CRO office. Otherwise, they may misconstrue your enthusiasm or verbal consent to their ideas as permission to act. In some countries, consensual (verbal) agreement often constitutes a contract to do business.

       So therefore it is wiser to be more cautious when talking with or negotiating with any other businessmen or companies and clearly state that you will need to "counsel with others" or "counsel with your head office," before proceeding further with any commercial sales, contracts or related projects.

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       For example: If someone in your Home meets a music producer who wants to record and help promote and support our music and work, it is better to go slow. Clearly explain that you will need to get some advice first before he proceeds any further with his ideas or plans. Business discussions and negotiations always take time in the business world, so it is best not to feel pressured to enter into something (or even verbally agree to it) without counsel from your CRO office.

       I don't want to lose the rights to our songs or anything we have where we cannot produce, sell, and distribute them ourselves. I don't want any kind of contract that limits us from either productions, sales or anything! I'm not about to beg in to sign over all of our rights to anything, and anybody that does is a fool! And anybody who does in our outfit without authorization, we'll disown them! (ML #283A:2,14.)

       I agree with your [top Family leadership] trying to control all our worldwide copyrights as much as possible and also supervise any further contracts with outsiders (ML #311C:23).

11. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME: REGARDING CHILDREN AND PARENTS

       Many of the items listed in this section are somewhat repetitive of the earlier sections, which deal with the rights of children and parents, this time as applying to the Home itself. As such, the same basic explanations apply, so we did not repeat them under this section. (See Rights of Parents and Rights of Children.)

       Since the children and parents have certain individual rights granted them under the Charter, it becomes the Home's responsibility to work toward fulfilling those rights.

The Charter Home:

A. Shall have regard to the welfare of and allocate sufficient time for the spiritual, emotional, intellectual and physical development of its resident children, and provide resources, materials and personnel to fulfill these responsibilities.

       Our children are a precious gift from the Lord and we must do all we can to ensure that they are well cared-for in every possible way. While it is ultimate ly the parents' responsibility to make sure their children develop properly, the Home's population is collectively responsible for the same. It is the Home's responsibility to schedule the time, and provide the resources and personnel, to provide the means for its children's spiritual, intellectual, emotional and physical development.

       Obviously, a Home can only provide personnel as available within the Home. If they don't have enough Home members to help properly care for and teach their child ren, they should try to get extra personnel, or hire a tutor. If their schedule doesn't allow for enough Word or school time, then they should revamp their schedule. If they don't have enough resources and materials for their education, then they should likewise pray, discuss and attempt to find ways to get whatever is needed. Advertising the need in the CRO Want Ads could be helpful.

       Once we establish that these children belong to all of us and God holds us all responsible, regardless of wh o physically bore them, we'll have a little more to work with, a few more people to work with, and we won't be giving all the responsibility—physical, intellectual and spiritual—to only the flesh parents. Even the System knows they have to share the responsibility of their children with the churches and the schools (ML #2670:15).

       When it comes to our children, whether they have one parent or two, if they have a need, it's the job of all of us to be burdened and desperate about that need. The se are our children, and we need to pray fervently for God's supernatural love that will help us to love them as we do our own natural children. We need to pray for them as we pray for our own, and be as desperate for solutions to their problems as we are for our own (ML #2953:4).

B. Provides, by whatever means, an adequate education for its resident children by allotting sufficient time, opportunity and educational materials for them to become competent in a manner appropriate to their age, ability and aptitude in the skills of reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, practical-life skills and other curricular subjects.

       As stated in the Rights of Children, F., children are entitled to an adequate education; thus the Home is responsible to provide it by whatever means is available to them. Generally Homes will home school their children, which we have found to be the best method for schooling. However, there may be situations where it's not possible to do so, or the Home doesn't feel it has qualified personnel, in which case the parents and the Home could decide to get a private tutor or place the children in an outside secular or religious school. The decision to do so belongs to the parents, but the Home must be in agreement, in accordance with the Home Life Rules, J. If the Home is not in agreement, the parents, of course, can use their Right of Mobility to remedy the situation.

       We're for the most part trying to encourage them that they can te ach their own children, have their own childcare workers and their own teachers if possible. If not, they can send them to the local System [school] if they have to! (ML #332B:80).

C. Allocates sufficient time for the keeping of the educational records of the resident children.

D. Keeps parents informed, on a regular basis, of the spiritual, physical and educational well being of their children under the age of 18 residing in it, regardless of the residence of the children's parents.

1. For resident parents, "regular basis" is determined by a simple majority of the Home.

2. For non-resident parents, "regular basis" is not less than once during every three-month period.

       See Child Progress Report Form in Appendix B, which can be used for this purpose.

E. Allocates sufficient time for resident parents and children to have time together, in accordance with Required Meetings and Activities, G. and K.

F. Allocates sufficient time for the children to regularly engage in wi tnessing activities. (See Rights of Children, E.)

G. Supplies sufficient assistance to resident parents in the physical and spiritual care and education of resident children. A two-thirds majority determines "Sufficient assistance."

       We're the only way He has of training and shepherding and parenting them. He's expecting us to do a good job of it, and He's holding us all responsible for the children He's given us. Each one of us is going to have to give an account to God for what we've don e with our children. Have we played our part—no matter how large or small—faithfully, diligently, lovingly and responsibly? Have we done our best to help our children? (ML #2670:31.)

H. Agrees together upon a discipline standard for its resident children that operates within the bounds of, and in accordance with, the Child Discipline Rules.

I. Supplies to its children a current address and/or telephone number of their non-resident parent(s).

J. Recognizes that a single parent faces th e challenge of raising his or her children without the assistance of a spouse, and therefore may need additional assistance in supplying the physical, spiritual, emotional, educational, economic and disciplinary care of their children. Having recognized this fact, the Home endeavors to supply, to the best of its ability, additional assistance and to take into account the special challenges single parents face.

       As mentioned earlier in the Charter, our single parents are faced with more difficul ties in raising their children than couples are. Added to this, they can sometimes be tempted to feel that they and their children are a burden to the Home. With the enactment of this Charter, many single parents may fear that they will be voted out of, or not be accepted into Homes, because they may be considered a weight to the Home.

       Many single parents already feel that they must almost do "double duty" by working extra hard in order to prove to the Home that they are a blessing. This, coup led with the fact that they must be both mother and father to their children, can be very taxing on them.

       We must all recognize the difficulties and challenges that our single parents face and do all we can to help. We should put ourselves in their shoes and try to be loving and understanding of their and their children's needs, and our love should be "in deed and in truth" (1 John 3:18). We need to "bear one another's burdens" (Galatians 6:2).

       Members of the Home individually and collective ly are responsible to help supply the single parents in the Home with additional help in the care and raising of their children. All of the children in your Home are your children, because they are Family children. Every child needs a daddy and mommy, and if they don't have one, the Home and its members are responsible to help provide their needs. They might want to arrange for the single parent to team up with another single or a couple in a parenting teamwork so the single parent would have re gular help with and counsel about their children.

       Our Homes need to take into account that our single parents face a special challenge in the care of their children, and if any of our single parents are not able to carry the same weight in a Home as a married couple, or single person without children, the Home should be loving, compassionate and understanding.

       In our society it is easier for a woman with children to live separately from her husband because she has the assistance of the Col ony in the care of both herself and her children if the Colony so agrees. Even a man with children separated from his wife will receive assistance in the care of his children in our Colonies if the Colonies so agree (ML #359:15).

       [Jesus,] do help us all to cooperate and do all we can to be unselfish and loving and kind and helpful to our young parents and their children. (Maria: And to our older single parents, Lord.) Yes, and to our older single parents who are usually women with children. He lp us all to be more kind, unselfish, considerate and helpful, and the single men to help the single mothers and really be good fathers! (ML #2582:21.)

12. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME: REGARDING FINANCIAL MATTERS

The Charter Home:

A. Is financially stable, lives within its income, operates within a monthly budget, and meets all of its financial responsibilities and obligations by whatever legal means necessary.

       It is mandatory that our Charter Homes be financially stable, and stay free of debt by living within their income. The Home should operate within a budget agreed upon by its voting members, and endeavor to meet its fi nancial obligations. "By whatever legal means necessary" means that if some people need to get secular jobs in order to fulfill this clause, it is allowed. In the Home Life Rules, I., you'll find stipulations that must be followed regarding taking jobs.

       The financial management of a Home is a major factor in its management. Each Home should decide upon a monthly budget and work to operate within that budget. This should include upcoming expenses such as medical costs for the birth of a baby, t ravel, visa, and legal expenses such as passport renewals, etc., so that such anticipated expenses don't end up contributing to the Home getting into debt through poor management.

       The thing to do when you find you can't live within your income is to either cut your living down to the level of your income, or figure some way to raise the income (ML #1271:2).

       We are determined to stay within our budget! We have never ever borrowed any money for our economy, we have always made sure we stayed within our budget and spent only within our income, with even a little left over in a margin of reserves for safety in case of emergency (ML #2037:109).

       One of the best ways to practice austerity and make sure you're investing the Lord's money well is to keep a budget. If you're faithfully setting money aside for your bills and regular expenses, you'll be much more on top of it and you'll know exactly where you stand financially, which will help avoid the end-of-the-month "cram" when it comes time to pay your rent (ML #2813:24).

       (Question: What's your feeling about people who get jobs to keep the Home going?) Where it's impossible any other way, of course! Paul did it, he made tents part time. He took all kinds of different jobs part time in order to support his missionary work. So if they have to take a job in order to help support the work, that's better than failing. If all else fails and there's no other way, get a job (ML #673:78,79,81,83).

B. Pays its bills on time, keeps current on its financial liabilities and remains out of debt, in accordance with the Financial Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

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1. Overdue bills or payments on borrowed funds are considered Home debts that the Home is responsible to pay. After two months of debt the Home is automatically placed on Probationary Notice.

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a) Not maintaining the $50 Tool fund per person will be considered a Home debt (see Financial Rules, point C., and Home members will be in viol ation of the Charter for non-payment).

2. Loans are financial liabilities that the Home is responsible to pay.

       The Home must pay its debts and stay current on its payments on any outstanding loans, such as a Home loan, or Service Center or PPC credit. Sub-clauses 1 and 2 differentiate between what is a debt and what is a liability. Throughout the Charter both terms are used. The explanation of the difference between debts and liabilities is found in the Rights of the Individual: Within the Home, B.

       If a Home is in debt, meaning that it has unpaid bills for two months in a row, it will automatically be put on Probationary Notice by the continental office.

       There are other Financial Rules which need to be followed as well.

       God's Word says that we are to provide all things honest toward them that are without, that the ministry be not blamed (2 Corinthians 6:3; 8:21), and so that you do not bring reproach on the cause of Christ as well as the name Children of God! This also inc ludes ... your failure to pay bills or debts that you rightfully owe! You are to owe no man anything, save to love him (ML #143:40,41).

       Thank God we as a Family have refused to go the borrowed money route! ... It's been a Family rule all our Family life, except in a few rare cases where we have permitted fairly reliable Homes to borrow a few little dollars to help them over the hump (ML #2538:19).

       You can't pay some bills in advance, but you better set aside for them and plan on the fact tha t it's going to be approximately so much. Set it aside so that you can pay it when it comes, instead of saying, "Oh well, when the bill comes due, the Lord will supply somehow." That's the way a lot of you were operating, and all of a sudden the bottom dropped out. The bills came due, but instead of the Lord supplying, the Lord taught you not to do business that way (ML #701:69).

3. Should a Home member decide to move out of the Home, the member is personally accountable for, and must pay, th eir portion of any debts and/or liabilities incurred by the Home. (Portion equals the total amount of all debts and/or liabilities divided by the number of voting members 18 years of age and over.)

a) A Home may, by a two-thirds majority, free a departing member from all or some of his portion of the Home's debt and/or liabilities, providing the remaining Home members assume his portion.

       This is explained in the Right of Mobility, A. 4.

4. Should the Home disband, each voting member is p ersonally accountable for, and must pay, their portion of any debts and/or liabilities incurred by the Home, in accordance with Rights of the Charter Home, sections C. and D. (Portion equals the total amount of debt and/or liabilities divided by the number of voting members 18 years of age or older.)

       If your Home is going to close, the voting members must ensure that all its bills and liabilities are paid. If the time comes for the Home to close and all the bills aren't paid yet, then each mem ber must assume the responsibility to pay for their portion of the Home's debts and liabilities. (See more on this in sections C. and D. of Rights of the Charter Home, and also see Closing Home Form in Appendix B.)

C. Determines all financial direction and decisions by a two-thirds majority.

       No major [financial] decisions or purchases, etc., shall be made ... without at least a two-thirds consent of the local Colony Council (ML #329B:44).

1. The Home may make expenditures or incur liab ilities, with the understanding that each member has the personal responsibility to pay his or her portion should the Home as a whole be unable to. Liabilities may not be incurred without the agreement of a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members who are 18 years of age or older.

       All financial matters must be voted on and decided by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members who are 18 years of age and older. This differs from most other Home matters not having to do with fina nces, which are decided upon by a simple majority. If the Home has debts or takes on liabilities, such as a Home loan, these belong to the Home as a whole. A portion of that amount only becomes the individual's personal debt or liability when a member, 18 years of age or older, decides to leave the Home, or the Home closes before all of the debt or liability is paid.

       The following scenario should give a general idea of the way a Home's finances would work. A certain Home has 14 voting members 18 years of age or older. The Business teamworker proposes a monthly budget to the Home, which they pray about and discuss, then make some modifications and vote to approve. Of the 14 voting members, eight of them are on outreach regularly, while the other six take care of the children and other Home duties. The eight outreachers are the ones who normally bring in the funds for the Home, since the six on childcare and Home duties don't have as much opportunity to witness, although they do go out at least their two hours per week. However, the six that stay behind make it possible for the outreachers to do their work because they take care of the children and other essential Home duties throughout the day.

       If for some reason the Home went $1,400 into debt, or took out a Home loan for that amount, it would be owed by the Home, and the outreachers would probably step up their fundraising activities to pay this amount off. The Business teamworker would not say, "Everyone is now responsib le to pay off $100 each, so you six childcare people must figure how you're going to pay your $100!" The debt would be the Home's debt collectively, and it would be up to the Home to figure out how to pay it.

       If, however, a bit later one of the childcare workers decided that she wanted to move Homes and gave her 30-day notice, then she would become responsible to pay her portion of the Home's debts or liabilities, which in this case would be $100, before departing. And she would need to be giv en time off from her childcare duties for raising these funds. If the Home felt that they would rather have her continue to take care of the children during her last 30 days in the Home, they could vote that she does not need to pay her debts or liabilities, but that the Home and its remaining voting members will assume it.

       We hope this helps explain the concept that debts or liabilities belong to the Home, and a single member is only responsible to pay his portion if he leaves the Home or the Home closes.

2. The Home can authorize its officers to pay specified regular monthly expenses without monthly approval. A two-thirds majority determines "Regular monthly expenses."

3. The Home can authorize its officers to make expenditures up to a predetermined amount set by the Home. Expenditures above this pre-determined amount cannot be made without a two-thirds majority.

       Rather than necessitating that the Home meet together every time the rent or other regular monthly bills are due , the Home may decide to have the Home teamwork pay specified regular monthly bills each month without having to get monthly approval via a vote of the Home.

       Likewise, the Home may agree to authorize the Home teamwork to spend a specific amount of funds without having to seek prior approval of the Home. For example, the Home could authorize the Home teamwork to spend, or give permission for others to spend, up to a certain amount, say $200. If they did, the teamworker would be authorized to al low the provisioner or shopper to buy something costing up to $200 if the provisioner discovers a bargain while out. The teamworker would not have to ask the Home, since the cost of the item is under the $200 limit the Home has set. If the amount to be spent was over $200, they would have to ask the Home about it first.

       The Home may likewise vote to allow the teamwork to authorize the spending of set amounts of the Home's budget; so if the Home has budgeted $100 for home improvements, the Home teamwork can authorize the spending of that amount for that purpose, but would need to get Home approval before spending over that amount.

       There may be other cases where the Home decides that someone else besides the Home teamwork might be allowed to spend a set amount, such as the Home's shopper. They may authorize him to spend $100 in the event he decides to buy some item the Home has been looking for, etc.

       These two preceding sub-clauses are not meant to imply that you must do these thin gs; they are included to let you know that you can do them if you choose to. Whether or not you give the teamwork this authority, and the amounts you set, is completely up to you. The Home's finances belong to the Home and its members, and it's up to you to collectively decide how they will be managed.

       All adults should be aware of the financial state of the Home. And that means all the adults should know the specifics concerning how you're doing financially—how much money is on hand, how t he money is being spent, how your Home budget and buffer are doing, what bills are owed, etc.—not just percentages, but actual amounts. All adults should feel responsible for the support of the Home, not just your outreach teams or your poor Business teamworker! (ML #2929:39.)

D. Discloses on a regular basis (but must be at least one time per month) to all voting members the financial standing of the Home, including all financial assets, liabilities, debt, income and expenditures. A two-thir ds majority determines "regular basis."

       As explained in the Rights of the Individual Within the Home, B., each voting member is entitled to know, and it is the Home's responsibility to disclose, the complete financial state of the Home.

       It's up to the Home to decide how often and in what way this information is to be disclosed. It is the Home teamwork's responsibility, and they must disclose this information at least one time per month. Please understand that once a month is not the recommen ded amount of times, it's the minimum.

       One of the most important ways of preventing murmuring is by staying in unity and good communication concerning the finances—your income and your expenses. One of the best ways of doing this is by sharing the know in detail, using the actual numbers instead of just percentages, with all the Home members from senior teens on up. ... This communication will help shift the burden of the finances off the shoulders of just a few people in the Home teamwork and onto the shoulders of all the mature members in the Home (ML #2813:21).

E. Discloses to a voting member, 18 years of age or older, who is considering joining the Home, what his portion of the Home's debt and liabilities will be.

       Any member, 18 years or older, who is seriously considering joining another Home has the right to know what his portion of that Home's debt and liabilities amounts to, as part of the criterion for making his decision. (See Right of Mobility, D. 5.) The Home is n ot expected to reveal any other specifics of their Home's financial matters to the inquiring member.

13. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME: REGARDING THE WELFARE OF ITS MEMBERS

The Charter Home:

A. Provides for the spiritual, physical and material necessities of all of its members to the best of its ability by:

1. Allotting sufficient time on a regular basis (not less than four times per week), during which the greatest possible number of voting Home members can assemble for united prayer and reading of God's Word and other World Service publications.

a) The assembly may be su bdivided into groups.

       Our Homes must faithfully allot time for united reading, prayer and praise. Each Home should organize its schedule so the adults and teens can gather together and have a feeding meeting, based around prayer and reading the Word together. Time and length of these devotional meetings may be determined by the Home, but must occur at least four times per week. These meetings might be morning devotions, vespers, or evening united reading times in which new MLs are read.

       The Home may decide that it's better for different age groups to have all or some of their united Word time together. For example, if there are a number of teens in the Home, it may be decided that the teens should have a separate devotional time geared toward their needs. There may be times when devotional meetings might include almost everyone in the Home; others might just be for voting members. It is up to the Home and the teamwork to decide on these matters.

       It is not mandatory that all-new W S publications, including GNs, be read unitedly unless stated on the publication. The teamworkers may decide that it would be beneficial for a new pub to be read unitedly, and in such a case the united reading should occur within three or four days of receipt of the mailing.

       Four times per week is not the recommended amount, it's only the minimum amount. If your Home gathers together less than this, you are violating the Charter and your Home is in jeopardy of being put on Probationary Notice.

       I believe the church of God needs a session together of assembly and fellowship and inspiration and studying God's Word and praising the Lord! So by all means please get together for a little fellowship and inspiration and prayer and a little feeding on the Word together—united devotions! Just keep everyone together, and before you let them go, read a MO Letter or Bible or Word of some kind.—If there's a new MO Letter out, you can read that. As Paul said, "Neglect not the assembling of yo urselves together." We need to get our hearts together and our minds together and our spirits together and our bodies together—we need to get together! (ML #1384:10-12.)

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2. Allot a minimum of 1½ hour daily (or 10½ hours weekly) for Home members to commune with the Lord through the reading of His Word and other WS publications (privately or unitedly), prayer or hearing from the Lord in prophecy.

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       Beside the need for the Home's members to gather together for united r eading, every member also needs personal Word time. The Home must allot time for its members to have this private reading and prayer and prophecy time. Of course, it is up to the individual to use this time wisely. The 10½ hours per week of personal Word time (united devotions may be counted as personal Word time) is not the recommended amount, it is the minimum. (See Word Rules.)

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a) New disciples under one year in the Family must be allocated an additional 7 hours per week, or 17½ hours total, in order to complete their study of the full foundation course for new disciples, as well as to complete their basic memory work.

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       New disciples need to get their grounding in the Word before they get embroiled full-time in other ministries. In order to make it possible for them to complete the study of the foundation Letters, listed in Appendix F: Babes Basic Course, and Appendix H: Priority Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family, an additional 7 hours p er week must be allotted by the Home for this specific purpose. It's preferable that this additional Word time be on a daily basis, or at least spread throughout several time slots during the week, but not less than 7 additional hours of Word time per week. It is estimated that these reading courses can be completed within one year of a new disciple joining if this minimum time is allotted for it.

       An exception to this rule would be for live-outs, catacombers or Fellow Members changing to CM wh o may already have this foundation from years of reading the Word before joining the Family, who may not need a full year to finish the course. But they should be given this additional time for up to one year to complete this course according to what the Home teamwork deems to be necessary.

       When asking the Lord concerning how much time new disciples should have in His Word, He said, "With this decision you are being wise investors, for you are taking the one talent that these new young ones ha ve, the seed of faith which I have implanted within them, and you are watering it and causing it to grow. For faith comes from My Word, and any investment of time, of a quiet peaceful place to read and learn, of support and encouragement as they grow in Me, will be an investment that will be well rewarded.

       "Upon the weaker members you must bestow the greater honor and this honor you must give in the way of the time needed to feast on My Words, to do the extra duties for them, which will enable them to have this time. This will be an act of love—these will be many acts of love. It will be as the illustration that your Father gave of the farmer kneeling beside the cow & serving her. So must you elder ones do for these young; to give and to serve, that they in due time and season will be able to stand straight and tall beside you."

       And this reminds me that you, my dear children, have an appointment with me every day, and you'd better not miss it, or you're going to be sorry! (ML #1 55:30.)

       In order to be able to teach His Word to others, we read and study it ourselves daily. ... So in order to have the strength and stamina to do our important job, we have to spend time getting filled with His Word. As the old saying goes, "In order to do the Master's work, you need to have the Master's power, and to get it you must spend time with the Master (Jesus)" (Maria #76:13).

3. Supplying and maintaining a well organized Home library of Family publications.

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a) All publications in the Home must have portions deleted or modified if necessary, in accordance with the WS purge advisories.

       An well organized Home library is a vital part of the Home. If the library is either non-existent or is so disorganized that it's almost impossible to find the reading material that you're looking for, then the Home members will be discouraged from getting into the Word, and will suffer spiritually.

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       It is the Home's responsibility to attempt to gather the Fa mily publications necessary for as complete a set of pubs as available, both in English, and where needed and available, in their local language, for their Home library, and to keep them available and in order. As much as possible, the CROs and area shepherds should assist the Homes in this endeavor. Also, all pub purges must be complied with.

       Having more than one library per Home for larger Homes is advisable, allowing easier access to reading material. Also, if the Home should ever divide in to two Homes, each Home would have a library available.

       So that's what I'm advocating, the Home library!—One copy of each, and if you happen to have more copies than that, you assemble everybody's copies of everything someplace where everybody can have access to them (ML #1282:10).

4. Immediately posting a list of the contents of new WS mailings, and making them available to Home members, in accordance with the Classifications of Family Membership and Literature.

       When a WS mailing arri ves in the Home, the list of titles must be posted for all to see. The contents of the mailing should be immediately made available to the Home members, appropriate to the age of the members and in accordance with the Classifications of Family membership and Literature in the "Fundamental Family Rules," which outlines who is permitted to read what literature. For example, new members are not permitted to read the CM publications until they have completed their first three months in the Family an d finished the Babes Basic Course.

       Contents of the mailing that the teamwork intends to read unitedly with the Home do not need to be made immediately available, but they should be read unitedly with the Home within three or four days of the arrival of the mailing, and made available thereafter.

       If you've ever had a hard time keeping track of your weekly mailings of GNs, FSMs, WNDs, etc., you'll appreciate the new "Mailing Contents Form" from your NPC or LIM—a concise list of exactly what each mailing contains, which should be posted on your Home bulletin board for all to see as soon as your mailing arrives! (LNF 131:5.)

5. Allotting each member of voting age a regular day off from Home duties (preferably weekly, but at least one day in every 14-day period).

       Each voting member is entitled to a regular day off from his or her Home duties. The ideal is one day off each week. If this is not always possible, then they must have at least one day off within every 14-day period. I t will be a united Home decision of how often, which days, whether they get a full 24 hours, or just during working hours, whether Family day will count (since taking care of a number of children for a full day may not be considered much of a day off), etc.

       In order to do their best, it is imperative that our hard-working Family members have sufficient time for rest and refilling.

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a) 14- and 15-year-olds that are actively involved in Home ministries should have a day off the same as voting members.

       All work and no play makes a very dull student, and an even worse witness, and lack of consideration for our human weaknesses and the needs of the body does not encourage loyalty or faithfulness (ML #58:17).

       None of us can stand these constant pressures of continuous demands on our time, strength, body, soul, and spirit to which we are so often forced to submit, without relief, by the press of time, necessity, need, and one emergency after another so prevalent in such a fast-moving and rapidly expanding work such as ours where the laborers are so few, the Harvest so big, and there's so much to be done to gather it in before the Storm! Even the Lord Himself could not bear the continual strain and virtue drain of a constant ministry to the multitudes, which is what your ministry really is, so He frequently had to get away from it all and take His disciples up into the mountains or out to sea or on a private visit to friends for a spiritual retreat, rest, and rec uperation and inspiration—sometimes even all alone! (ML #169:5,2.)

6. Maintaining a clean, safe and healthy environment, and a physical standard of living that is in harmony and conformity with the Family's goals, and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       Our Homes need to maintain a good physical standard. If a Home is in harmony with, and conforms to the goals and rules of the Family, they should be able to maintain a good standard. Homes that do not maintain a clean, safe and healthy environm ent, as with any of the other responsibilities of a Charter Home, are in jeopardy of being placed on Probationary Notice by their area office.

       Cleanliness isn't next to Godliness, it is Godliness, it's part of being Godly! So keep it clean! Keep your hands clean, your body clean, your food clean, the air clean, the yard clean and the carpets as clean as you can. ... It's only God that ever keeps you, but for God's sake, give Him a little cooperation! (ML #1031:69.)

       Another important way th at our Family can give the Lord some cooperation ... is to simply obey the many health, cleanliness and safety rules Dad has given us in the Letters. ... So for God's sake, our Family's sake, our children's sake and your own sake, obey the Lord's Letters and keep a clean, safe house!—Maria. (ML #2572:39,41.)

7. Supplying sufficient healthy food to eat, in accordance with the Food and Drink Rules.

       Eat good food in a well-balanced diet! (ML #190:23.)

       The Lord's servant is worth more than his money: Don't be penny-wise and flesh-foolish! ... Take care of your health, get plenty of rest and eat well, so you'll have plenty of strength for God's service (ML #209:11).

8. Supplying needed prayer, care, support and medical attention to those who are sick or physically ill, impaired, pregnant, or in need. The decision on medical care is determined by the member himself, or in the case of a child, by their parent(s) or guardian(s).

       If a Home member is sick, it is the Home's respons ibility to support them physically and spiritually and supply the needed prayer and care. If they need medical attention, it should be made available. If they're in the hospital, Home members should visit regularly.

       If a member is physically weaker, impaired, pregnant or has special physical needs, which would include nursing mothers and elderly members, the Home should not only meet their medical needs, but endeavor to meet their dietary and therapeutic needs, and be understanding of their ne ed for extra rest and/or a lighter workload.

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       The Home is also responsible to help meet its members' needs for prenatal, dental and eye check-ups, and any resultant dental work or eyeglasses needed, by provisioning or whatever means necessary. Children should have initial dental and eye check-ups no later than age four, and annually after that whenever possible. (See Responsibilities of Parents, G.)

       In the case of emergency medical needs, some of the Home's HER fund may be used i n accordance with the Financial Rules, B. 2.) However, since there is plenty of advance notice for births, the Home should set aside funds in advance to cover the cost, as well as any other predetermined medical expenses.

       I was never in a Colony, but what I didn't concern myself with every little detail of that Colony, as servant of all ... checking to see if they all were tucked in, feeling their covers to see how many they've got, checking the windows to see if they have proper ventilation , checking the heater to see if it was safe. I used to do that every night in any Colony I was ever in. When you hear somebody in your Colony is sick, what do you do about it? (ML #213:21-22.)

       We must not overburden these weaker brethren, and we must take it easier on them that are weak ... and we must not expect more of them than they are able to bear! The Lord never gives us more than we are able to bear, and we must not overload others (ML #161:24).

       Just like the laying on of hands or the anointing of oil or the calling for the elders of the church, having a public prayer for somebody who is sick, all of these are testimonies and witnesses of your faith, and they're also in obedience to the commandments of the Lord, as well as the partaking of the bread and wine at Communion (ML #1409:26).

9. Ensuring that its members have sufficient exercise and fresh air, in accordance with the Get-Out Rules.

       Get out in the fresh air and sunshine daily, even if it's only "cloudshine"! W e all need a little get-out time, exercise, recreation and happy, playful, just plain fun in the beautiful Creation of God in the garden of God outside where we can get lots of good exercise and fresh air and sunshine to refresh us! (ML #1362:206.)

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10. Allotting sufficient time for its members to engage in evangelism, in accordance with the Outreach Rules.

11. Creating the conditions in which its members can carry out their responsibilities, exercise their rights and govern them selves in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       The Home is responsible to operate in such a way that its members can abide by the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

14. RIGHTS OF THE CHARTER HOME

The Charter Home has the right to:

A. Determine, by a two-thirds majority, its basic nature, goals and operating procedures, providing it operates within the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and "Fundamental Family Rules," and endeavors to reach the goals of the Family and the agreed-upon goals of its area.

       The Home is free to decide its main vision and thrust: What its main ministry or ministries will be, and specifically what goals it will atte mpt to reach. For example, Home members may decide their main ministry is primarily "Consider the Poor" or "youth outreach" or a "prison ministry" or "tool distribution," or perhaps a combination of different ministries. Such a decision is completely up to the Home.

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       Before implementing the directions of a prophecy received for your Home, the voting members, by a simple majority, must be convinced that it is the Lord's will, and should test the prophecy against the other ways to kn ow God's will. If such a matter has brought about some confusion or conflict within the Home and it can't be sorted out by seeking further confirmation or clarification from the Lord, prayer and discussion together, the prophecy should be passed on to your area or continental office for their judgment, as outlined in the Prophecy Rules.

       The Home members collectively choose the way the Home operates. They decide upon its procedures, and determine its Home regulations, providing they operate wit hin the broad guidelines established in this Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules," and they are endeavoring to reach the goals of the Family and/or the area. (The only Homes that will not have this and a few other specified Home rights are Service Homes, and Homes in sensitive countries.)

       [The Home] must therefore be self-governing according to God's guidance! Your [Home] must learn to operate under its own leadership according to its own faith and by the ways and means that it feels l ed are best for its particular habitat, soil and surroundings. It must learn to let go of the farmers [shepherds] and let God lead, and "For God's sake, follow God!" under His personal guidance by His Word alone! (ML #315C:11.)

B. Choose by a two-thirds majority to move the Home to a new location in the same city, or in any city in the same country that has no Charter Family Home, providing it is not a "closed" city, and written notice of intent is sent to the continental office and appropria te area office 30 days prior to its move.

1. If the Home wishes to move to a city within its present country of residence that already has a Charter Family Home, Home members must follow the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home.

       Where a Home decides to live is up to its members. They can move anywhere within their present city, or to another city in the same country, simply by giving the continental office and appropriate area office a 30-day notice. Befor e informing the landlord of their intent to move, they may want to inform their area office, as they may know of others looking for a house. They should also inform the Family member who signed the contract if he or she is not presently in the Home, and fulfill their legal obligations to the landlord.

       If your Home is moving within the same city and has found a house in or near a neighborhood that already has a Home situated there, it would be wise and loving to consult with the existing Home a nd/or city council as to whether or not it is agreeable to have two Homes in such close proximity, as it may not be the best for the local work.

       If the city they want to move into already has a Charter Home, the Home will have to follow the proper procedure outlined in Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home.

       Pioneer teams such as road teams and pioneering Colonies consisting of personnel pioneering a new Colony on their own in a new area do not necessarily have to be subject to prior clearance from the officers of the area involved as long as they cooperate with them as regular Member Colonies of the area and are subject to its administration, report faithfully and contribute to its support, if possible, and work together for the welfare of the whole in accordance with our general rules, including the distribution of our literature and the winning of new disciples (ML #334B:37).

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C. Choose by a two-thirds majority to disband the Hom e, providing the Home's officers submit their intent to disband the Home in a written notice to their area and continental offices. The offices must receive this Closing Home Form 30 days prior to the Home's closure. At the time that it tenders its 30-day notice, a finance meeting must be convened with its voting members to disclose the Home's financial status, and determine the measures needed to pay the Home's debts and liabilities, if they have any, by any of the following means:

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       A Home may choose to close or disband. In doing so, they must notify their continental and area office. (See Closing Home Form in Appendix B. and/or the Closing Home E-mail Form in the HomeARC.) This is merely notification, not seeking approval to do so, as the decision to close belongs to the Home. The offices must receive this form 30 days prior to the Home's closure. Closing Homes failing to submit this form may be penalized.

       As in the above situation, before informing the landlord of th eir intent to move they may want to inform their area office and/or their ABM, as they may know of others looking for a house. When deciding to close a Home, the Home members should fulfill their legal obligations to their landlord.

       God's Word says, "Provide all things honestly for them that are without." In other words, pay your bills on time in order that there be no reproach on the cause of Christ. If any Homes close down and leave bills behind, it's a very poor testimony. (1Timothy 3:7.) Any family that closes down leaving bills behind ought to be named publicly, and they should not be able to join any other Homes! (ML #683:61,62.)

       The Home must also hold a meeting to disclose the status of its finances. If they have debts or liabilities they must pay them, in accordance with the following guidelines:

1. By whatever legal means necessary.

       If some members need to get a job to raise the funds to pay off their debts, liabilities or expenses, they may do so. The rules gove rning employment are covered in Home Life Rules, I.)

       If God didn't send it in, I got myself a job and earned it! There's no excuse for anybody not having enough money to pay for their needs and their bills (ML #684:42).

2. Using as much as possible of the Home's financial assets above essential operating expenses toward the payment of its debts and liabilities.

       Common sense would dictate that the Home would first of all use whatever finances it has available, above what it is going to c ost for them to operate for the remaining time the Home is open, towards paying their bills and/or debts.

3. Liquidating communal assets to the extent necessary to pay any remaining debts and liabilities. (A two-thirds majority determines the liquidation of communal assets.)

       If the Home doesn't have the cash assets available to pay its debts or liabilities, and/or is not able to generate income through any other means, they should liquidate—which means to convert into cash by selling—thei r communal assets. Communal assets are any assets that belong to the entire Home, such as furniture, video equipment, pots and pans, perhaps some vehicles, etc.

       This doesn't mean that everyone's Walkman or guitar should necessarily be sold. Determination of which communal assets should be sold should be made through prayer, discussion and voting and with a great deal of consideration for and by all concerned. If your Home has a difficult time deciding such matters you may seek counsel from you r area office.

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       Of course, some of the goods in your Home may not be communal assets of the Home. Some may belong to individuals in the Home. And some may be area assets, such as a vehicle that may have been purchased or provisioned by another Home or the area provisioners, and these goods must be returned or passed on to another Home for their continued use by the area.

a) HER funds must be returned to the continental office, in accordance with the Financial Rules, B. 2. d.

b) Tool funds should be distributed to each member, to take with them to their next Home.

c) Any other World Service-issued funds must be handled according to instructions given by WS for the particular funds involved.

       The HER funds must be returned to the continental office, as these cannot be used to pay bills. Neither can Tool funds be used to pay bills, but each member must take their Tool funds (in cash or tools) with them to their next Home. Any other WS funds which may have been allo tted to the Home must be handled according to the instructions given by WS.

4. If the Home has a financial surplus or other assets, it may decide, by a two-thirds majority, how to apportion it. If a decision cannot be reached, it must be equally apportioned to all voting members.

       If the closing Home has a financial surplus, the Home should decide how to apportion it. When deciding this, they should take into account the financial needs of the Home members. A family with six children might h ave greater need than a single person. A single mom with children might be given more than a couple with children. It will need to be prayerfully decided upon with love and understanding. If a two-thirds majority can't reach an agreement, then the surplus must be equally divided among all voting members.

D. Disband, in extreme circumstances, before all of its debts and liabilities are paid. In such a case the Home must:

1. Apply for a Home loan from the continental office, if available, to pay any further outstanding debts or liabilities.

2. Assign to all voting members (18 years of age and older) their individual portion of any remaining liabilities, including the Home loan. Home members then must assume their portion as a personal liability, which must be paid within 90 days. In such a case, a listing of the Home's members and the amount of their personal liabilities must be sent to the continental office.

a) A member's failure to pay their portion of the Home loan within 90 days will result in the loss of their Charter membership until repayment is made. The continental office may extend the 90-day period when warranted.

3. Designate a member (or members) to take care of all the remaining business relating to the closure of the Home, and report on the progress of such to the area office.

4. Members are responsible to inform any Home that they intend to join of the amount of their personal debts and liabilities.

       There may be situations where the Home is obligated to disband before all of its debts and liabilities are paid. For example, the owner of the house may give the Home 30 days notice because he is selling the house. This would mean that the Home would have to close even though some debts and liabilities are unpaid. In such a case, after the Home has attempted to pay off whatever debts and liabilities they are able to in the available time period, they must take out a Home loan from the CRO, if available, to pay off the rest. Hopefully, f ollowing all the steps in point C. will make it possible to pay off most of the debts and liabilities so the amount of the Home loan will be small. The amount available for the Home loan will depend on the amount of funds the CROs have in their Home loan funds, and the details and amounts will have to be worked out between the Home and the CRO. The amount applied for must be approved by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members. (See the Home Loan Grant Form in Appendix B.)

       The amount of the Home loan taken out for this purpose is then to be divided by the voting members (those 18 and over) as their personal liability, and to be paid back in accordance with the repayment plan established with their continental office.

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       If a member is moving into an existing Home, the Home can vote to assume the incoming member's liability in accordance with the Right of Mobility, D. 6. The Home would then work out a schedule for payment of the member's liability (home loan) wit h the continental office.

       The Home must also designate a person (or persons) to take care of all of the old Home's business, so that all the loose ends get tied up, and they must report their progress to the appropriate VS. If it requires that someone actually stay behind to take care of such business, then two people should stay, in accordance with the two-by-two rule.

E. Determine, by a two-thirds majority, the personnel make-up of the Home.

1. New personnel cannot be invited to join t he Home, or be received as Home members, without the agreement of a two-thirds majority.

a) The receiving Home's officers must verify the potential member's Charter Member status. They may also ask the incoming member or the appropriate officers for additional information.

       The decision to accept new personnel into a Home is to be made by the Home's voting members. A Home can't be required to take in personnel that it doesn't want.

       The Home teamwork of the receiving Home must verify the po tential incoming member's Charter Member status. They can also seek information about the new member if they desire, either by informing the new member that they would like particular information about him and assigning him to ask his present shepherd to write the receiving Home, or asking the potential new member's shepherds directly. They can also ask the VS or CRO about the new person if they feel this is necessary to make their decision; but most important is that they ask the Lord. When try ing to decide such an important matter as whether or not to accept a new member into the Home, it is recommended that the Home pray and ask the Lord for His direction and will through prophecy.

2. The Home may revoke, by a two-thirds majority, the Home membership of any person residing in it if:

a) At least two voting members unitedly propose to the Home's officers that a member should be asked to leave the Home. The matter should be discussed with the Home's officers to determine whether it should be brought up for discussion in a Home council meeting and voted on.

b) If after discussion with the Home officers the proposing members still feel it's necessary to ask the member to leave the Home, then the matter must be brought before the Home council. In such a case, the Home officers must privately inform the member in question that the matter is going before the Home council.

c) The Home officers notify all voting members that the matter will be discussed and voted upon in a Home council meeting.

d) In that Home council meeting, the member whose Home membership is in question is free to present the reasons why he feels he should retain his Home membership.

(1) The member is free to give his 30-day notice to leave the Home if he so desires.

       [Concerning] some of those unwanted [Family members] we've been reading about,... [the Home] didn't want to offend them, they didn't know how to get rid of them or cause a stir with these [problem people]. ... (Maria: On the other hand, the people in charge of the household need to be sure that they're ruling it in love and wisdom and not just start kicking everybody out that doesn't come up to their rigid standards.) ... There's always got to be some kind of standard or criterion or rule, and of course it's right in the Bible. Now if you can bring your complaint to the person and they won't hear it, then the Bible says to go with two or three witnesses. ... If they won't hear them or receive them, then you' re supposed to bring them before the whole congregation. ... It's not supposed to be just your little personal affair or matter, but it's a matter of the agreement of the church and the saints on it. If the whole congregation agrees that you're right and they're wrong and they refuse to repent, the Bible says you're to throw'm out (ML #980:58,65-67).

3. If, by a two-thirds majority, the Home decides to revoke a member's Home membership, the Home is responsible to:

       Just as the Home has the r ight to accept new members into it, they have the right and authority to vote members out. Hopefully this scenario would be rare, but since it might happen, it is necessary to cover it in the Charter.

       A person might be voted out of the Home if deemed incompatible by the Home's voting members, but the individual may still be fulfilling the Responsibilities of the Individual Member. This is different than recommending someone for Fellow Member status, covered later in point 4. If someone is simp ly voted out of a Home, he does not lose his Charter Member status.

       To vote someone out, two members must first agree that the person should not be part of the Home and they then present it to the teamwork, who must inform the member and the Home that this suggestion will be brought up in a Home council meeting. During the Home council meeting the member is free to present his feelings on the matter. The voting members would then vote on the matter, probably by secret ballot.

       At any time bef ore the Home council meeting, the member may instead decide to give his 30-day notice. In such a case it would then be unnecessary to bring the matter up at the Home council meeting, since the member has already made the decision to leave.

       The departing member is of course free to join another Charter Home or open their own Home once they leave their present Home.

       If a member has been voted out of the Home, the Home must:

a) Give the member 30 days to leave the Home.

b) Notify the area and continental office of its decision within three days of the vote, specifying the reason for its decision.

c) Forgive the member his responsibility for any portion of the Home's debts or liabilities.

d) Allow sufficient time for the member to engage in fundraising activities on a regular basis for the purpose of raising a reasonable amount of finances to facilitate his move to another Home, or the setting up of his own Home. A two-thirds majority determines "reasonable amount."

(1) If the member is engaged in fundraising activities for the purpose of his departure from the Home, at least 50% of the net income he generates is to be used to facilitate his move to another Home or the setting up of a new Home.

e) Supply the member whose Home membership has been revoked with a reasonable amount of financial assistance to help towards his move to another Home, or towards the starting of a new Home. A two-thirds majority determines "reasonable amount."

       So, in summary, if the Home does vote to withdraw someone's Home membership, the above stipulations must be met:

       1.) A two-thirds majority must make the decision in a Home council meeting, during which the member must be able to present his side of the matter in question.

       2.) If the decision is taken that the member should leave the Home, the person must be given 30 days to leave, during which time he can work on raising funds. The person is also released from any obligation to pay any portion of the Home's debts or liabilities.

       3.) Within three days of giving the notice to the person concerning his departure, the Home must notify the VS and the CRO of the decision, giving the reasons why they're voting the person out.

       If the CRO or VS feel that the decision by the Home is unfair or unloving, they can attempt to persuade them so from the Word. For example, if a Home votes out someone merely because they feel that person or family is a financial burden, the CRO or VS can talk to the Home and try to g et them to reconsider. However, if the Home members still decide to stand by their decision to vote the person or family out, in spite of what the CRO or VS says, they have the right to do so.

       Revoking someone's Home membership is quite a drastic step, especially for the person involved, so as compensation the outgoing member will be freed from his or her portion of the Home's debts and liabilities.

       Also, during the 30 days the outgoing member(s) remains in the Home, the Home must allow the member(s) enough time for fundraising to facilitate his move to the next Home. If this member(s) has children, the Home is, of course, expected to help take care of the children while the member engages in these fundraising activities.

       While the member is fundraising, at least 50% of the net income is to go towards facilitating his move, while the other portion of the funds would go to the Home. The Home can allow the member to keep more than 50%, but not less. Let's say that the outgoing memb er goes witnessing for the day to raise funds, and brings in $100 from distribution of Family tools. The seed corn for the tools that he or she distributed needs to be taken out and then the tithe paid on the remainder. If the seed corn is $20 and the tithe and FAF contribution is approximately $9, that leaves $71 net income. Of that $71, the Home may have requested 20%, or approximately $14, towards Home expenses, so the outgoing member would keep the remaining $57.

       The Home can instead decid e to supply the needed funds for the member's move if they wish, and/or supplement the funds raised. Or in a case where the Home would like to retain the person's help during the 30-day period and would rather have them stay at the Home instead of fund raising, they can reach a mutual agreement. For example, if the person happens to be a teacher and the Home wants to continue using their services for those 30 days, they can, providing the person agrees, and the Home gives them a reasonable amoun t of financial assistance to help with their move.

f) Recommend, by a two-thirds majority, that a member's Charter Member status be revoked, and that the member be placed on Fellow Member status. In such a case, the Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status, must be observed.

       If two-thirds of a Home's voting members feel that one of its members deserves to be moved to Fellow Member status, it may make that recommendation. In such a case the Home must follow the Procedur es for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status.

15. ROLE OF A SERVICE HOME

       A Service Home provides a service that benefits the Family nationally or internationally, and as such is accountable to more than just itself for its activities. It therefore operates under the auspices of the continental office. The continental office will have the ultimate responsibility in determining a Service Home's basic nature, goals, direction, activities and personnel.

       A Service Center could fall under this category, as could other specialized Homes s uch as a VS or Media Home, or any other Home set up for the specific purpose of supplying a service to the area. The CRO may designate certain Homes as Service Homes, according to the Procedures for Becoming a Service Home.

4. In the case of Service Homes that are fully supported by WS, WS reserves the right, when deemed necessary, to overrule decisions affecting the basic nature and goals, and finances or personnel of the Home.

       The LIM translation centers and the IVM/JAS are WS-sponsored S ervice Homes.

16. RIGHTS OF PERSONNEL IN A SERVICE HOME

A. Due to the nature of Service Homes, those volunteering to be Service Home members must understand that while they are members of a Service Home they may need to relinquish specific rights granted by the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights," if deemed necessary by the continental office. The specific rights which may need to be relinquished are:

       The personnel of Service Homes retain all of their rights in the Charter, except the specific on es listed below. Any other right, other than those listed below in A.1-7, may not be withdrawn by the CRO. So Service Home personnel still retain their Right of Mobility, Rights of Parents, financial rights and so forth.

       If they wish to remain part of the Service Home, they must be willing to relinquish all of the seven rights specified below, and actually relinquish the ones that the CRO says are necessary in that given situation.

       The CRO may allow some of the Service Homes to retain certai n of these rights listed below, but retains the authority to withdraw these rights at any time it deems it necessary, depending on the need. The CRO may in some situations decide that the Homes can make any decisions relating to their rights guaranteed in the Charter, but before the decisions are implemented, they should inform the CRO.

       Being in a Service Home is purely voluntary, so if anyone does not wish to be in a Service Home and relinquish the specified rights, they do not have to be. Me mbers in a Service Home still retain their Right of Mobility and therefore they are free to depart at any time they wish, simply by giving 30 days notice just as if they were leaving any other Home.

       Following then is the list of rights, which those in Service Homes must be willing to relinquish, and must relinquish if the CRO deems it necessary.

1. Determine by prayer, discussion, debate and voting the basic nature, goals, direction and activities of the Home.

       The CRO may allow the Home t o decide Home goals, direction and activities as long as their decisions don't interfere with the service they are providing. It just depends on the situation and how greatly involved the CRO chooses to be, or how much they feel they need to influence the situation.

2. Freely elect officers of the Home in which they reside.

       In the case of Service Homes, the CRO has the authority to appoint the Home shepherds if he or she chooses to. Or the CRO may allow the Home to vote in the Home teamwork of their choice from among their members. Or the CRO may choose to appoint one person on the teamwork and let the Home elect the other two. It is a CRO decision how the Service Home's leadership is to be structured.

3. Bring up any matter in the appropriate Home council meeting, and have the matter brought to a vote.

a) Nevertheless, members may bring up and vote on any matters that do not contravene the basic nature, goals, direction and activities of the Service Home.

       Members of a Ser vice Home do not completely give up their right to bring up and vote on matters in Home council meetings. They only lose the right to bring up and decide upon any matters that may contravene the basic nature, goals, direction and activities of the Home. For instance, members of a LIM Home may not lose their right to discuss a wide range of matters and vote for certain changes in the Home. But they do not have the right to vote to start inviting visitors over to the Home without the approval of t he CRO, because it contravenes the basic nature of the Home. Neither can they vote on financial expenditures which would contravene the basic nature and activities of the Home or impede their production and services to the field.

4. Choose to move the Home to a new location.

5. Choose to disband the Home.

6. Determine the personnel make-up of the Home.

7. Revoke the Home membership of any person residing in it.

       In a Service Home, the personnel, location of the Home and the decision to keep open or close the Home all come under the jurisdiction and authority of the CRO. Also, the Home cannot vote members out of the Home. However, this is not to say the CROs overseeing such Service Homes wouldn't be open to suggestions and ideas that the members may have about any such matters.

B. The continental office can at any time withdraw permission for any member to remain in a Service Home.

       The CRO may, without the agreement of the members of the Home, revoke the membership of anyone in a Service Home. But if they do take such a decision, then it must be with the following stipulations:

1. If permission is withdrawn, the departure is to be governed as follows:

a) Forgive the member of responsibility for any portion of the Home's debts and liabilities.

b) Allow sufficient time for the member to engage in fundraising activities on a regular basis for the purpose of raising a reasonable amount of finances to facilitate their move to another Home or the setting u p of their own Home. "Reasonable amount" is determined by a two-thirds majority of the Service Home's voting members.

(1) If the member is engaged in fundraising activities for the purpose of departure from the Home, at least 50% of the net income they generate is to be used to facilitate their move to another Home or the setting up of their own Home.

c) Supply the member whose Home membership has been revoked with a reasonable amount of financial assistance to help towards their move to a nother Home, or towards the starting of their own Home. "Reasonable amount" is determined by a two-thirds majority of the Service Home's voting members.

       So as you can see, a Service Home operates somewhat differently than a regular Home. Personnel in regular Homes have all the rights of the Charter, whereas those in Service Homes relinquish some or all of the above-mentioned specific rights, if the CRO deems it necessary. A Home can only become a Service Home as per the Procedures for Becoming a Service Home.

17. SENSITIVE COUNTRIES

A. Due to the political, religious or otherwise sensitive nature of some countries, opening and operating Homes in these countries can be potentially dangerous or problematic. With WS leadership's agreement, the continental office may designate such countries as sensitive.

       There are a few countries throughout the World that would be considered sensitive, in that it would not be wise to allow just anyone to open Homes in any city of that country and conduct just an y ministry without working closely with the CROs or area officers.—For example, most Mid-eastern Muslim countries, or the former Yugoslavia, which is certainly a very dangerous situation to be in. In these types of situations, the Homes and their personnel will need to relinquish some specific rights. As with Service Homes, the Homes in sensitive countries don't automatically relinquish their rights, but the continental office does have the right to revoke specific rights according to the situa tion.

       A country can only be classified as a sensitive country through the Procedures for Designating or Revoking Sensitive Country Status.

       Relinquished rights for personnel in sensitive countries are much the same as for Service Homes, with the exception of the Right of Mobility. Therefore most of the same stipulations would apply.

       I would certainly advise you to be very cautious in your missionary work and witnessing and litnessing and distribution of literature in any such areas which have strong dictatorial governments lacking in personal freedom and are virtually closed countries to the Gospel, and particularly those of another predominant religion (ML #1004:71).

18. RIGHTS OF PERSONNEL IN A SENSITIVE COUNTRY

A. Due to the nature of sensitive countries, those volunteering to work in one must understand that they may need to relinquish specific rights granted by the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" if deemed necessary by the continental office. These specific rights are:

1. Determine by prayer, discussion, debate and voting the basic nature, goals, direction and activities of the Home.

2. Freely elect officers of the Home in which they reside.

3. Bring up any matter in the appropriate Home council meeting, and have the matter brought to a vote.

a) Nevertheless, members may bring up and vote on any matters that do not contravene the basic nature, goals, direction and activities established for a sensitive country.

4. Choose to move the Home to a new location.

5. Choose to disband the Home.

6. Determine the personnel make-up of the Home.

7. Revoke the Home membership of any person residing in it.

8. Points B., C. and D. of the Right of Mobility.

B. The continental office retains the right to remove personnel from sensitive countries at any time.

       Because of the nature of sensitive countries, the CRO is not required to give a member 30 days to leave the country.

       I don't really think that anybody ought to stay in some of those difficult foreign fields except the people who ... are a valuable asset to the work!... We don't have to leave it entirely up to the individuals whether or not they sh ould stay (ML #2385:75,76).

RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF CHARTER LEADERSHIP

19. ROLE OF WORLD SERVICES

A. World Services (WS) is the executive body of the Family, whose main function is to provide spiritual direction and international administration. This is achieved primarily through the production of publications, as well as through international administrative services, and the appointment of continental officers to provide pastoral and administrative services within their assigned area.

       In a nutshell, this is what WS does! And we truly pray that we have been , and will continue to be, a blessing to each of you.

       "World Services" emphasizes that we are performing several services for the whole World (ML #331C:63).

       The minimum services to be performed by World Services: ... MLs and other international publications, [audio/video] products, statistics, ... children's educational materials, ... and international supervision and administration of our total worldwide work (ML #657:73).

20. MAKE-UP OF WORLD SERVICES

A. World Services consists of:

1. WS leadership: Maria and Peter and their personal teamwork.

2. WS Homes: Those responsible for the creation and production of WS publications and outreach tools, and related administrational matters.

3. Continental officers: officers appointed by WS leadership to administer a continental area.

       This is a simple explanation of who makes up "World Services." Those who fall into one of the above categories are members o f WS.

       At times there have been questions raised by Family members about WS personnel. Some people seem to have the impression that those in WS are an elite group of perfect, problem-free people, which could not be further from the truth. WS personnel are people basically just like you. They have certain gifts and talents just like you do. They also have problems just like you do! They are just normal Family members who happen to be particularly good at various ministries and/or behind-the-scen es work. Those who work in publications are usually good writers, editors, layout artists, typists or secretaries. There are also cooks, childcare helpers, teachers, drivers, handymen, etc.

       And like you, WS personnel have NWOs that need to be worked on. They sometimes get lonely and even get tired of working behind the scenes, and miss the excitement of witnessing on the front lines. You'd find that World Service personnel are basically just normal Family members who have given up a great deal of their personal freedom in order to serve the Lord and the Family in this fashion.

       A WS Home is similar to your Home, with the exception that their main ministry is working on publications or tools behind the scenes. WS Homes have a daily schedule, including devotions, get-out, etc. If with their children, they fellowship with them at parent time, and basically do most of the things that you do. Similar to Service Homes, those in WS Homes relinquish some of the rights granted in the Charter . WS informs its members and potential members what those rights are.

       At times some WS members have gone from living in a WS Home to living in a field Home. In such instances, often these field Homes have expected the people coming from WS to be perfect role models, not realizing that WS personnel are just normal, imperfect Family members. So if at any time you meet a member of WS, or someone who at one time was a part of WS, please keep in mind that they are basically just like you. Please do n't expect them to be perfect, any more than you would want someone to expect you to be perfect!

       The same holds true for WS-sponsored Service Homes, such as LIMs and the IVM, as well as other local, non-WS behind-the-scenes Homes in your area, such as local music studios, Lit-Pics, etc.; they are made up of normal Family members just like you.

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B. In the event of death or incapacitation or any other reason that would render their leadership impossible, and in the absence of more c urrent instructions from Maria or Peter, the transfer of Family leadership authority will be as follows:

1. Maria: Peter would become the official head of the Family.

2. Maria and Peter: An interim leadership council, consisting of Maria and Peter's personal teamwork and one delegate from the officers of each continental office and WS unit will be convened at the earliest possible opportunity. The officers of each continental area and WS unit will choose their delegate by a simple majority .

3. Maria, Peter and their personal teamwork: An interim leadership council, consisting of one delegate from the officers of each continental office and WS unit will be convened at the earliest possible opportunity. The officers of each continental area and WS unit will choose their delegate by a simple majority.

a) This interim leadership council will decide, by a two-thirds majority, any WS leadership decisions until such time as a new WS leadership structure is in place.

b) The inte rim leadership council will, within 30 days of convening, through counseling and seeking the Lord formulate a proposed top WS leadership structure, which will then be presented to all of the continental and WS officers. After prayer and counsel, these officers will vote on the proposal.

(1) If a two-thirds majority agree to the proposed leadership structure, the proposal will then go to the Charter Homes worldwide for ratification. Each voting member will vote, and if a two-thirds majority ag ree, this top leadership structure will govern the Family.

(2) If a two-thirds majority do not agree, the interim leadership council will continue to handle any WS leadership decisions and a new proposal will be set forth in the same manner within 30 days.

4. Once a new WS leadership structure is determined, each member of the WS leadership teamwork must be confirmed annually, before February 1st, by a two-thirds majority of the WS leadership and the continental officers.

a) If a member is not confirmed for another term, the WS leadership and continental officers must nominate, and second, new candidates and vote by secret ballot. The nominee receiving the most votes will become part of the WS leadership teamwork.

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       Our beloved father in the Lord, David, for many years prepared each of us for his Homegoing by faithfully feeding and strengthening us with the Word. The Lord also prepared us all by making it very clear over the years, through revelation and otherwise , that Maria would take Dad's place as Prophetess and head of the Family, and that Peter would serve beside her as king. Having this specific direction, guidance and assurance has made Dad's passing easier for us all. As Dad said: "Who is the most logical instrument that God is going to use when I am gone?—Maria, of course!... The Lord has even said so several times, that she was going to become a great Prophetess of the Lord!" (ML #706:35.)

       It is our sincere belief that nothing untoward will happen to Maria or Peter and that they will continue to be God's mouthpieces to the Family and the world until the Lord's return. If, for some reason, the Lord has other plans, we believe that He will reveal this to Maria and Peter and that He will also reveal to them who should succeed them in leading the Family.

       If, however, Maria and Peter were to become incapacitated or otherwise unable to continue to lead the Family, even temporarily, and they had not set forth in a written statement who should govern the Family, the above procedures would be put into effect.

       The interim leadership council referred to in the above clauses would at the earliest possible opportunity gather together for prayer and counsel. They would unitedly make the decisions that WS leadership normally makes, and they would formulate a proposed plan for the structure and personnel that would then constitute WS leadership.

       We pray that this will never have to be put into effect, but we felt it was necessary to include these clauses in the Charter in order to have a contingency plan in place.

21. RESPONSIBILITIES OF WORLD SERVICES' LEADERSHIP AND HOMES

       The responsibilities listed below outline what World Services does and has always done. It is our hope that clearly listing these responsibilities will give everyone a clearer picture and better understanding of the function and role World Services plays in the Family.

World Services is responsible to:

A. Publish the Words that God gives to our Prophet and Prophetess.

       World Services' foremost responsibility is to publish the Word that the Lord has given Dad, and continues to give to Mama. If times get so rough or finances so low that World Services cannot publish any other material or provide any other leadership, we will continue, by God's grace, to always publish the Words that the Lord gives.

       There's only one thing we have to do, and that's publish glad tidings, publish the Letters! And all the glad tidings from the Family too, if we can. But let's get our priorities straight. ... That's the only thing w e're absolutely obligated to get out, and that is the Word of God, what God has to say.—The dreams, visions, prophecies, interpretations, teachings, revelations, whatever! (ML #1316:125,128.)

B. Determine the fundamental Family beliefs.

       As you know, there have been many different MLs published on a great number of subjects. Some of these Letters present fundamental and essential Family beliefs. It is World Services' responsibility to determine which matters, among the many topics covered i n the Letters, are to be considered fundamental beliefs that members must believe to retain their Charter Member status.

       Most of our fundamental and essential beliefs are compiled in "Our Statement of Faith." (For more about fundamental Family beliefs, see Responsibilities of Individual Members, point C.)

       [We need] to know the things that are unchangeable, like God and His Son Jesus and His Salvation and His precious Holy Spirit and His Word and His Creation and all the things we know are absolutes and are static, unchangeable, non-variable facts and figures! You have to know these first before you can know what might be changed or could possibly be changed, like some of our theories or guesstimates or personal opinions (ML #1934:61).

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1. Any new prophetic revelations must be approved by Mama and Peter and officially and expressly disseminated by WS as such before they will be considered a fundamental Family belief.

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       The Lord gives Mama and Peter His Wo rds and messages for the entire Family, and He gives local prophets His messages for their situation. Prophecy received in the Homes should be judged according to the written Word, the Bible and the Letters, both old and new. Prophecy that goes beyond these should be submitted to your leadership and/or Mama and Peter before it is acted upon. Any major changes that come about in the Family will be given and confirmed in the GNs by Mama, our "Winetaster." (See "Three Gifts of the Lord's Love!" ML #3005:106-129, GN 647.)

       (Jesus speaking:) You can be assured that any major changes that I bring will be confirmed through My leadership and through the continued written Word that I give to you (ML #3019:108, GN 655).

C. Formulate, determine, establish, update and publish Family rules, responsibilities and rights, which Charter Members are required to follow to retain their Charter membership. Changes in Family rules, responsibilities and rights are valid only when stated in a WS publica tion that they are amendments to the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and/or the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       WS publishes material on numerous subjects, all of which we feel is important and helpful to the Family. Much of this material is general guidance and direction that we believe will benefit those who implement it. In the past it has been somewhat difficult for Family members to know which of the things published in World Services publications are intended to be actual rules that must be obeyed, guidelines which should be followed, but are not required, or general counsel that can be carried out if the person or Home chooses to. This has led to a certain amount of ambiguity, which has at times been a source of conflict. In some cases, one person or Home may feel that something written in a pub is to be followed explicitly, and if not followed, it should be met with disciplinary action. Others might interpret that same point as good counsel that is to be applied accordin g to the faith and decision of each member or Home.

       This particular clause has been included in the Charter in an effort to eliminate any questions that may arise in the future when something is published as to whether it must be obeyed as a new rule or a new part of the Charter, or if it is something that each individual or Home can apply as they feel led of the Lord. From this point on, if WS intends for something to be considered a rule, it will be clearly explained within the pub that the particular item is now an amendment to the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights," or is an addition or a change to the "Fundamental Family Rules." If it does not specifically state that it is a rule, then whatever is written is not to be regarded as a de facto Family rule, but as helpful guidance and wise counsel. If you have prayed about this counsel and feel that it does not apply to your situation, you will not be penalized or disciplined for not implementing it.

       This is not meant to dem ean the importance of the general counsel contained in our pubs, nor does it mean that such counsel should not be implemented; it just means that Family members will not be penalized if they do not implement it. It is therefore up to each individual and/or their Home to decide if they will apply it or practice it in their situation.

       For the sake of clarity, when a new rule or policy is being introduced, we will include in the publication a notation indicating that a certain point is now an ame ndment to the Charter or to the "Fundamental Family Rules," so that it will be clear to all. From time to time, God willing, we will publish updated editions of the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules" as they are needed.

D. Publish general counsel for the Family, which Charter Members and/or Homes apply according to their own personal choice and decision.

       Anything that does not fall into the category of being Family doctrine, an amendment to the Charter or a stated Family rule is con sidered general counsel and may be applied according to each Family member's and/or Home's personal decision and choice.

       We are an Army! But you are expected to make your own decisions. ... You're there, and know the situation better than I do, so you're the one to make the decision with the Lord's help! I give you God's general overall plan! It's up to you to carry out the details and specifics and work out the logistics and individual tactics! The Commander in Chief lays down the general b attle plans and gives the general command to advance, but his generals and officers must work out the details, and the foot soldiers have got to carry them out! (ML #127:14,21.)

E. Provide counsel, guidance, recommendations and directives to continental officers, when necessary, on important national, international or continental matters.

       Attempting to help and assist the CROs in the shepherding of their areas is one of the major roles that WS leadership plays. There are times when WS leade rship offers counsel and advice directly to specific Homes or individuals through the CROs, but generally such counsel is given to the whole Family through the GNs and other pubs.

F. Process information from the Charter Homes' monthly reports.

       The CROs receive and read your TRFs, and World Services in turn gathers statistics and other information from the CRO offices to monitor the progress the Family is making, how much literature is distributed worldwide, how many souls we're winning, etc .

       Stats, you may say, are really a part of our communication, but I wish to emphasize them in particular as being absolutely essential and necessary for our well being. They are our pulse taking and temperature taking of the body politic to know exactly the health of the body and its physical functions (ML #1677:24).

G. Process information from Fellow Member monthly reports, and send Fellow Members appropriate WS publications.

H. Manage and disburse the Family's tithes, FAF, and offeri ngs as follows:

1. World Services' operating and living expenses, equivalent to the standard of living of an average Family Home.

2. Creation, production and distribution to the Family of publications and outreach tools.

3. Financial assistance to Family missions and missionaries.

4. Continental area or country projects.

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5. Family Aid Fund (FAF) for pioneer gifts, HER fund, Tool fund, "passed on" [death] gifts, Home loans, baby bonuses and, funds permitting, medical eme rgencies.

a) Home loans must be applied for from the continental office and not taken from the HER a Home is holding.

6. WS reserve.

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       World Services manages and disburses the Family tithes, FAF and offerings as per the above six categories. What is outlined here is nothing new; this is how these funds have always been invested. We are simply defining these things for the benefit of the Family and your personal understanding of WS. As pointed out in number 1, everyone who lives in World Services lives in housing that is equivalent to the standard of a normal Family Home. No one is living in luxury. In fact, visitors to Dad and Mama's Home and/or our WS Units have often been quite surprised at the very simple and rudimentary furnishings and lifestyle.

       Generally the tithes which come in each month are completely used to cover points 1-4. Once these needs are met, if there is any surplus it is put into the WS reserve. This reserve acts in the same way a Home's buffer do es. It allows WS to have a minimum reserve to cover WS operating expenses for one or two months should tithe income drop drastically. When this reserve grows beyond this need, the funds are generally given to the Homes, usually in the form of free tools, Home emergency reserves, mission gifts, etc.

       WS is also responsible for the management of the FAF, which is handled separately from other WS income. The FAF is a separate fund, into which WS pays 10% of its income each month, and the Homes pay 1% of their income. It is used for HER Funds, Tool gifts, Home loans, pioneer gifts, and emergency expenses when possible.

       Part of the Temple ministry was to channel all of this giving of gifts and tithes to wherever it was most needed, including the support of the Temple and all of its ministers, priests and Levites—which in this case is us, WS, your spiritual leaders and Levites of today, the elders and deacons of our modern church. We elders are your spiritual ministers, and our deacons operate the material ministries or tables and feeding, such as various WS Units' ministries, ... CROs, LIMs, the printing, mailing, publications and creations departments, with all the designing, artwork, photography, typing and secretarial work that needs to be done to create the Lit and administer our many Temple ministries, as well as distributions to the poor (ML #928:135-136).

I. Produce original mass distribution outreach tools.

       Those in WS work a great deal on GP pubs and tools for the Homes to use in their outreach. In addition, some outreach tools are sometimes produced on a local level, which is explained in the next point.

       Our WS Units have invested tremendous amounts of time, money and manpower to produce the tools you need so that you can effectively witness, present yourselves to the public and raise support (ML #2929:3).

J. Approve non-World Services-produced mass distribution outreach tools.

1. The continental office will approve translations of World Se rvices-produced outreach tools.

a) The continental office, with WS leadership approval, may authorize Homes to translate their own outreach tools when warranted.

2. Any mass distribution outreach tools to be used only within one country may be approved by the continental office.

a) WS, upon request by the continental office, may authorize the continental office to approve use of a mass distribution tool within several countries in their area, or their entire continental area.

3. Any Home newsletters, appeal letters, flyers, pamphlets, video or audio tapes or CDs with limited local distribution, or designed for distribution to the Home's contacts, may be approved by the Home.

a) Homes are permitted to include quotations and artwork from Family publications in their local pubs, and may translate these from the original publication without approval from their continental office.

       If anyone wishes to locally create a tool, whether it be a pub, video, audio tape, CD, etc. wh ich will be used for GP mass distribution by anyone other than members of their Home, they must receive approval from World Services before doing so.

       It is the responsibility of WS, or those appointed by WS, to approve materials for mass distribution. Therefore, before you allow anyone besides members of your Home to distribute newsletters, appeal letters, flyers, pamphlets, video or audio tapes or CDs your Home has produced, please follow the procedure outlined in point two above of having yo ur continental office approve them.

       WS publications, which are originally published in English, are to be translated into other languages by a recognized LIM or Lit-Pic under CRO supervision. The CRO may authorize a teamwork or an individual in the LIM or Lit-Pic to give approval on material they translate. Dad said, "Translation into another language is so important!—To make sure they get it right and what I really said and what I actually meant; otherwise a whole country could go astray ove r a misinterpretation!" (ML #2057:2.)

       There will be occasions when a LIM or Lit-Pic will not be able to service a Home (or Homes) because the language area is too small, or for other reasons. In such a case the continental office may, with WS leadership permission, authorize a Home to translate the WS outreach tools on their own instead of being supplied with an official translation from the LIM or Lit-Pic.

       The CRO may also give approval for specialized outreach tools to be created and used exclusively in one country; for example, a tract put together from different MLs to be used in a specific "Consider the Poor" ministry, such as for the homeless or a disaster situation. However, if the CRO wants to use this outreach tool in more than one country and/or throughout their continental area, they must have the tract or other publication approved by WS leadership. Or, the CROs may contact WS requesting permission to approve the tool for more than one country, or their whole continenta l area. To speed up the approval process where necessary, WS leadership may grant the CROs that authority, waiving the need for them approve the tool.

       If a Home's newsletter, appeal letter or other local pamphlet is only going to be sent to their Home's contacts, or used only for local distribution, the Home may approve it. This includes local advertisements for your local work, like your show group, your youth club, etc. It would also cover your testimony sheets you send to friends and contac ts, etc.

       If the Home wishes to use quotations from the MLs in a newsletter, appeal letter or other local pamphlet, they may do so. If these quotations appeared first in an original English publication and have not already been translated into the needed language by an CRO-approved translator, the Home can translate them if they have a suitable translator.

       If someone in a Home is invited to give a speech to a local gathering, the Home may approve the speech. We advise that you research the va rious speeches that you have received from World Services, which may be adapted to your local occasion. You should be able to find such speeches in your Home's legal dossier.

       If your speech, however, will be given to a national or international body, or will in some way have a significant impact on other Homes, even though delivered only to a local body, it would fall under the category of needing CRO approval before delivery.

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K. Allow or disallow the use of intellectual copyrigh t material, and related business matters, in the name of, or owned by, the Family or World Services, or any company and/or title of the Family.

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       The copyright of such Family publications—written and audio and video - and all trademarks of Family materials, such as World Services, Life With Grandpa, etc., as well as Treasure Attic and Kiddie Viddie trademarks and copyrights, are held by Family authorized companies. As such, these companies presently retain the right to give or deny permission for their use and to authorize or disallow any business matters relating to these copyrights or trademarks.

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L. Collect the permissions from Family members who contribute to collective Family works. Members who submit written, audio or video material for publication by a company associated with the Family agree to also sign a written agreement to transfer use of, and/or the copyright itself, to a company set up for this purpose. In the absence of an agreement to the cont rary, all articles submitted to such a company will be considered as transferred in exchange for the benefits and consideration of Family membership.

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       All materials that are submitted for use in a Family publication or audio/video production, including but not limited to written, audio and video works, will be regarded as exchanged for the benefit of the work, free studio time and as one of the responsibilities of Family membership should you choose to submit them.

       When you choose to submit a work for the purpose of Family publication, for example, an author sending in a song to be used for an FTT, or an article submitted for a written publication, it must be of your own volition. And you must be willing to sign a written agreement to allow the use of the material by a WS-endorsed company which has been set up for this purpose. In the case of songs, since these are often used in GP productions even if originally meant for an FTT only, you will be asked to sign an agreement giving a WS-endorsed company the right to use the song, before it can be recorded in a Family studio. In the case of written works, should one be slotted for GP publication, you will be sent a request to assign the right to use the work at that time. (See also Responsibilities of Individual Members, P.)

       I made definite stipulations time and time again on that. We hold the copyright, and we control the contract, and we keep the ownership and all the rights, and all we sign over to [the System] is their right to reproduce and distribute under certain conditions…. (ML #283A:12).

22. AUTHORITY OF WS LEADERSHIP

If deemed necessary, WS leadership has the authority to:

A. Amend or suspend all or part of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights," and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       It is inevitable that as time goes on, and the needs of the Family change, that changes will be needed in the Charter or the Rules. We may also discover that there are points which we thought would be workable that turn out not to be and will need to be changed. Suggested changes in the Charter are welcome and can be recommended and suggested by anyone. This is your Charter. It has been written to help you in your service to the Lord, and if parts of it are not workable, become outdated or need revamping, we want to change it. So after using it for a while, please share with us any changes you feel should be made. WS leadership, in consultation with the CROs and the rest of the Family, will make any changes to the Charter.

       WS leadership also has the authority to suspend t he Charter should there ever be a need. This would be highly unlikely, but should something occur in the future that we do not foresee now, WS leadership reserves the right and has the authority to suspend this Charter.

B. Declare a State of Emergency in any continental area, country, city or Home; thereby suspending all, or part of, the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules" for a specified area and period of time, and to inform the Homes affected.

       Ther e are times when emergencies arise, as was the case with the persecution in Argentina, and because of the nature and seriousness of the situation, direct intervention of Family leadership was necessary. Leadership needs to be free to make decisions and instruct people to do whatever is necessary to manage areas in emergency situations. During such times it may not be possible to allow everyone to vote on every decision that has to be made, as among other reasons, there may not be time to do so.

       In a situation like this, World Services will declare a specific country, city, or Home to be under a State of Emergency, and state that the Charter and Rules are being suspended for a specified period of time. The Charter and Rules will not be suspended indefinitely. If the emergency is still in existence after the specified period of time, World Services will inform those affected that a new specified time period is in force. If World Services does not set a new time, then the State of Emerg ency is terminated once the original specified time period expires.

       Referring again to the persecution in Argentina as an example: it was necessary for WS to intervene, as virtually all of the leadership was incarcerated! Decisions had to be made and action taken without consulting with everyone involved. Had the Charter been in effect at the time of the raids in Argentina, WS would have declared Argentina in a State of Emergency.

       Once the brethren in Argentina were released and felt it expe dient to leave the country, it meant that quite a number of Family members needed some place to land. In a similar case in the future, World Services might put surrounding countries under a State of Emergency and suspend the part of the Charter, which states that Homes have the right to vote to accept new personnel. Family members would have to have a place to go, so World Services could mandate that the Homes in those localities take in some of the refugees until further housing could be found for them.

C. Appoint to and/or remove from office any continental or area officers.

D. Veto or annul any decision made by continental or area officers, as well as any area goals.

E. Countermand any continental office appointments of area officers.

F. Arbitrate any matters that continental officers are not able or authorized to decide.

       There may be times when WS leadership will need to relieve a continental officer or area officer from their position, or veto or override one of thei r decisions. This rarely happens, and if it does, WS will explain its reasons to those involved, and if necessary to the whole Family, in order to account for its actions.

23. OBLIGATIONS OF ALL FAMILY OFFICERS

       All leaders and shepherds in the Family are obligated to act in a certain way and perform certain duties if they wish to become or remain Family officers. Following are the obligations that apply generally to all levels of leadership in the Family, followed by a comprehensive list of the responsibilities and authorities for each level of leadership.

       Thank You, Lord, that You have entrusted [our leaders] with such precious responsibility. May they not take it lightly, but seriously, as good stewards of Thy Kingdom, to realize what a great responsibility and what a grave responsibility it is to have all these lives in their hands and be responsible for their leadership (ML #734:159).

All Family officers are obligated to:

A. Endeavor to carry out the duties of their office in a loving, prayerful and competent manner, and to the best of their ability, properly and lovingly shepherd those whom they are responsible for.

       Family leaders need to be loving leaders, as love is the most important attribute of Godly leadership. They also need to be faithful, prayerful and competent, and to do their job to the best of their ability. Lord help us all to be loving, wise and prayerful, and to lead people to His Word!

       We need people first of all with love! If they haven't got love to begin with, they're nothing and they can do nothing! I don't want anybody in our leadership anywhere in the Family that's not working for that one reas on, trying to save souls, the lost to begin with, and trying to help the soul-savers!—Really, sincerely, honestly concerned about them, not just doing some kind of formal, mechanical job, going through the motions without the power thereof. (2Timothy 3:5.) (ML #1819:24,25.)

B. Operate within the authority of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       One of the main purposes for the Charter is to clearly define the responsibilities and authority of lea dership, so that everyone will know the boundaries Family leaders operate within. Leaders cannot take or exert any more authority than is granted to them in the Charter, and must operate within its boundaries, and according to the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       We have to have certain standards for the leadership, and they shouldn't be leaders unless they can keep those standards and operate according to those rules (ML #1202:61).

C. Encourage individuals and Homes to live in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules," and to impose appropriate and proper disciplinary action if they do not.

       It's very important that leaders encourage the Family to live in accordance with the Charter. If they find that someone or some Home isn't, they must implement the proper disciplinary action. Such action could include placing someone on Probationary Status or Fellow Member status, or full or partial excommunication, or putting a Home on Prob ationary Notice depending on the offenses and what the situation warrants. These disciplinary measures must be applied in accordance with the proper procedures listed in the Procedures section of the Charter.

       We need the regulation and we need some form of control to make sure that our people behave themselves ... and act properly and don't endanger the whole Family (ML #1202:35).

       Law without enforcement is no law at all! If you don't enforce it, your word means nothing. The law is then of none effect. ... (ML #1712:11.)

D. Endeavor to answer questions and give counsel on how to solve problems by directing the inquirer to the appropriate Bible passages or WS publications that offer guidance and counsel on the matter; when needed, offer prayerful, Word-based advice, in counsel with their co-officers if necessary; or seek counsel from a higher authority on matters that no WS publications address, or are matters or questions beyond the experience and/or authority of the officer.

       This is a major point! It's not a leader's job to make decisions for individuals or Homes that they should be making themselves, nor to demand they do certain things. One of the main purposes of the Charter is to allow and encourage people to make their own choices according to the Word and their personal leading of what the Lord shows them through the "Seven Ways to Know God's Will."

       For various reasons, Family members have sometimes depended too much upon leadership to make personal decisi ons for them rather than deciding for themselves. In addition, leadership has sometimes taken too much authority upon themselves. It is our hope that the Charter will allow everyone in the Family to overcome these two problems.

       The leader's job is not to make decisions that others are supposed to make for themselves; leadership needs to avoid—in fact, refuse—to make decisions that they are not supposed to make. The leader's job is to point people to the Word and to other Family pubs in order to lead them to the counsel that has already been written. Leaders must endeavor to teach people to go to the Word, to pray, to hear from the Lord and to counsel, so that they can personally find out what the Lord wants them to do.

       When searching the Word for answers or direction, one will find that there may be a wide spectrum of choices within God's Word. In such a case, the person may want some counsel and guidance from leadership.

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       Of course, if nothing has been published on the matter at hand, or the member wishes to ask for counsel in the case of the Word not being explicit on the matter, then the member can and should seek counsel from a leader who may have some experience or knowledge of the matter, and may have some prayerful counsel to give the person. When a leader needs to give an individual or a Home counsel on some matter, they should be very prayerful and endeavor to be sure that their counsel is Word-based and that they have heard from the Lord on the m atter. If the leader does not have any experience in the matter, or is not sure of what counsel to give, he or she should ask the Lord and/or pass on the question to a higher level of leadership.

       In any case, the person or the Home should make the final decision on the matter, not by the leader.

       Many young leaders and Colonies are writing us for answers to questions, which have already been thoroughly dealt with in past MO Letters! All they need is the Letters so we can refer them to the a nswers and not have to continually repeat these in unnecessary replies and special communications, and oftentimes too late to prevent the trouble! (ML #156A:7.)

       Teach the Homes to make their own decisions. When [you leaders] come around and are asked what to do, say, "Why don't you read the Letters? It's in the Letters. If it's not there, why don't you pray about it? That's your job to make the decision, not mine." Now if it's a question about something the Homes don't really know about or hav en't heard about or something, well, that's a different story (ML #671:8).

       Public spiritual leaders of any kind must have a tremendous knowledge of the Word and be able to give the Word. That's the ministry of people who are shepherds: They have to feed the sheep. Then they [the individuals or Homes] have to make their own decisions on the basis of the light that you give them and the food and the Word you give them. They have to make their own decision (ML #1002:33).

E. Ensure, to the best of their ability, that the rights of the members and Homes under their jurisdiction are upheld and are not being infringed upon.

       It is paramount that leaders at all levels ensure that the individual rights granted in the Charter are being honored.

       I want to find those [shepherds] who really love the sheep and are concerned for them and have a heart! (ML #662:67.)

F. Endeavor to live in accordance with the WS publications on the subject of wise and loving leadership.

       There are many Fa mily publications covering in detail how to be a loving and wise leader, and how not to be harsh and dictatorial. All of our Family's leadership must endeavor to apply these principles in their lives.

       If you're given more responsibility and are shepherding others, will you be the loving and kind sample that you wish others were with you? "Neither as being lords over God's heritage, but being ensamples to the flock" (1Peter 5:3). (ML #2865:56).

G. Take time daily for personal prayer.

       Wit h prayer being such an important and essential part of our lives, officers should pray individually and with others for the well being of their flocks, and the Lord's wisdom, direction and love.

       The main job of a shepherd is to keep in touch with the Lord—to begin the day with sweet music—praise and fellowship. We have to learn how to first of all rest at the Lord's feet. The secret of calm and peace and rest and patience and faith and love is that resting in the Lord!—Getting calm before the Lord, praising the Lord and seeking the Lord first. And then you just impart this to the sheep—it's a spirit—you impart that very atmosphere. ... The shepherd must feed of the elements of the earth to be satisfied, and to satisfy his flock. He too must sit upon the hillside and pipe sweet music unto his Creator in praises, to bring peace to his own soul (ML #98:4,2).

24. RESPONSIBILITIES OF CONTINENTAL OFFICERS

       All the points listed under this section are things that our CROs already do, but including them in the Charter will make it clear to all what the job of the CRO entails and what is expected of them.

Continental officers are responsible to:

A. Fulfill the Obligations of all Family Officers.

B. Regularly keep WS leadership informed of their personal activities, and the general activities of their continental area.

C. Determine major decisions by simple majority vote of their teamwork of officers. In the event of a tie vote, the officers must submit the question to WS leadership.

       Because our leadership operates in teamworks, there is no one individual that has sole authority or responsibility. Major CRO decisions must therefore be made by a majority vote of the CRO teamwork after prayer and discussion about the matter. Not every matter has to be decided through voting. However, the major ones, which affect the overall area and/or teamwork need to be decided in counsel and prayer together.

       Decisions must be made in counsel, first of all with the Lord, and then together and in agreement on all major decisions. Let their councils make a united decision on these things, no individual making that final decision, but the council making the decision. ... I mean, as well meaning as anyone might be, as good as their motive might be, nobody, no one person alone, has the wisdom, nor should take the responsibility of mak ing such major decisions. They must be made as united decisions of the body (ML #301A:5,7).

       In the case of any tie votes ... we ourselves can cast the deciding vote, M & M [WS leadership] (ML #336A:34).

D. Immediately inform WS leadership of all matters having, or with the potential to have a major effect on their, or any other, continental area.

       Besides general reporting, the CROs need to keep WS leadership informed of anything out of the ordinary that they perceive is going to have a ma jor effect on the Family in their area, or other areas, for either good or bad.

E. Operate an efficient office to process the Charter Homes' monthly reports and coordinate all necessary communications with the Homes, area officers and WS leadership, as well as offer counsel to the Homes and area officers when deemed necessary.

       Every CRO needs to maintain an office to handle the administrative duties for their area, including the reading and processing of Home TRFs, as well as coordination o f communications between the different levels of leadership.

       We are going to [have Continental Reporting Offices] with only a small, efficient and economical staff to handle all of your ... reports, stats and funds, and to be responsible directly to World Services under our immediate supervision (ML #832:16).

F. Distribute all designated WS literature and communications to the Homes in their continental area.

       Each CRO area is responsible to make sure WS mailings are prepared and sent to the Homes, as well as any other communications World Services requests to be passed on to the Homes.

G. When possible, feasible and necessary, to the best of their ability, supply their continental area Homes with important WS publications in the local language.

       It is not possible for the CROs to ensure that the national disciples in every language area get the pubs in their language, and especially not all the CM pubs. Unfortunately, we simply do not have the manpower or the resources nee ded to translate all the CM pubs, or even many GP or DFO pubs into so many languages. However, when it is possible, feasible and necessary, an attempt should be made to do so.

       In some language areas we have LIMs which reproduce virtually all the major World Services publications in their local languages. However, in other areas, where the national Family population is not so large, we have Lit-Pics instead of LIMs to translate some of the Family pubs mainly for GP consumption, and occasionally various other pubs for our national disciples. In other areas where there are very few nationals, it has been necessary for the nationals to learn English in order to read Family pubs.

       Let's only print the magazine in languages where there's wide distribution and great need, and possibly [have] LIT-PICs who print only the pick-of-lit that is most needed in your particular language area (ML #970:12).

H. Make available, to the best of their ability and resources, good quality outreach tool s in an appropriate language to the Homes in their continental area, and oversee the centers that produce such tools.

1. The continental office, with WS leadership approval, may authorize Homes to duplicate their own outreach tools when warranted.

2. The continental office must approve any non-WS audio or video tools produced in their area for GP distribution within a single country.

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a) Non-WS tools to be used for GP distribution in more than one country require WS leadership approval, unless WS leadership grants permission for the continental office to approve the tool for use throughout their continental area.

3. Homes may duplicate WS-produced black-and-white tracts.

       The CROs are responsible to supply, as best they can, outreach tools for their area. This is generally accomplished through Service Centers (SCs), which the CRO is responsible to oversee in order to guarantee a continued flow of outreach tools to the Homes.

       There may be occasions when an SC wi ll not be able to service a Home or Homes, either because the Home is too distant, or for a number of other reasons. In such a case the continental office may, with WS leadership permission, authorize a Home to reproduce the WS outreach tools on their own instead of being supplied from a SC.

       Without this specific permission, Homes are not permitted to reproduce WS outreach tools, except for the black-and-white tracts that WS has produced.

       The CRO is responsible to duplicate outreach tools th at can be used in the area, but this doesn't necessarily mean that it must be in the language of the area. An example is Norway, where we may not be able to have all of our GP pubs available in Norwegian, simply because we don't have the translators or the resources to translate all the GP material. However, because a majority of the people that we reach in Norway speaks English, the CRO would be fulfilling their responsibility by supplying English lit, as that would be an "appropriate language. "

       On the other hand, supplying GP pubs in English for Russia would not necessarily be an "appropriate language," since few Russian people can understand or speak English.

I. Establish a Family and Education Department (FED) to offer counsel on the childcare and educational needs of our children, and recommend educational materials and resources.

       The concerns of the Family and Education Department (FED) will include many areas of family life, especially those concerning the children and yo ung people, such as: childcare and shepherding, pregnancy and baby care, health, home schooling, teacher training, parenting, JETT/teen shepherding, JETT/teen education, Christian Vocational College (CVC), educational resources, etc.

       The word "education," in this sense, does not just refer to scholastic education. The education that our Family children receive in fact includes at least four major areas: the Word, scholastics, vocational training and witnessing. As Dad said, "Our whole purpose is education—educating people in the truth of the Gospel!" (MOP 26:54.)

       We've got to make sure we're taking care of our young people, and be sure we're giving them what they need (ML #2845:25).

J. Give or deny clearance, within 30 days of receiving the request, to any person requesting clearance to a country within their continental area.

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1. Except in the case of sensitive countries, clearance is automatically granted if the member does not receive a response to his clearan ce request from the continental office within the prescribed 30-day waiting period.

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2. Within 14 days upon receipt of a clearance request, the receiving continental office will need to respond to the applicant with a form message receipt, acknowledging that their clearance request was received and including the date that the application arrived, which date begins the applicant's 30-day processing period.

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       The Member Evaluation Form has now been discontinued, with the exception of certain Muslim and other countries specified by WS. All clearance applications now only need to include the application form and a Want Ad, unless the applicant wants to open their own new Home in a city presently without a Home, in which case only the Clearance Request Form is needed to apply for clearance.

       The continental office will publish the individual's Want Ad, indicating with the Want Ad whether clearance has been granted or is still pending. If clearance is denied the Wa nt Ad will not be published.

       Although the applicant receives automatic clearance if the continental office does not deny clearance within the specified time period, members planning to pioneer their own Home are responsible to ascertain whether the city they are planning to move to already has a Charter Home, and if so, they will need to follow the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City That Already Has a Charter Home.

       In the Right of Mobility, D. and E., clearance to another area is explai ned more fully, but in brief:

       1.) A person is free to move anywhere within their present country without the permission of the CRO, providing they meet various conditions.

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       2.) Members may only move from country to country within their CRO area if they have received clearance from their CRO. A clearance form is available to be used in such cases. (See Clearance Request Form in Appendix B.)

       3.) Members who wish to move to a country in a different CRO area must apply for clearanc e from the CRO area they wish to work in. Again, a Clearance form is available to be used in such cases. (See Clearance Request Form in Appendix B.)

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       When seeking clearance to go to another continental area, members should send their clearance request to their ABM or CRO, who will immediately pass it on to the appropriate CRO. The continental office must acknowledge receipt of your clearance request within 14 days. Your clearance request will automatically be granted unless you rec eive notification from the continental office within 30 days from the date on the notification receipt that your clearance has been denied.

       If someone wants to move to a Home in a country in another continental area, they would probably want to write for, and perhaps even wait to receive their clearance before giving their 30-day notice to leave the Home.

       When receiving clearance to a country, you have the CROs permission to move to the country; however, it is up to you to find a Home that w ill receive you before you move to that country, as the CRO has no authority to insist that a Home take someone in. So if you are not in contact with any Homes in your prospective destination, it would be wise to send a Want Ad to the CRO of that area to place in their Want Ad pub, in addition to seeking general clearance to the country. (See Want Ad Guidelines in Appendix B.) Assuming you receive clearance from the CRO, and a Home or Homes responds to your Want Ad, you then could directly work out your arrangements for joining a Home.

       Or if you receive clearance to a country from the CRO, you have the right to open a Home in any city that doesn't already have a Charter Home.

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       Please note that these clearances are required for moving to other countries or areas. If the main purpose of your trip is to visit friends and relatives and you will not be involved in outreach work, such as a witnessing road team would be, then you would not need prior clearance.

K. Designate Monthly Prayer Days and publish a regular continental area Prayer List.

L. Regularly publish information that is provided by the Homes in their continental area, as to available personnel and the Homes' personnel needs.

       Ideally, individuals and Homes will be able to initiate personnel moves themselves, including handling the necessary communications directly between themselves. However, since this may not always be possible, due to a lack of available information, this CRO service has been designed to assist Family members in exercising their Right of Mobility.

       The area shepherds will no longer orchestrate personnel changes in the Homes, as this right and responsibility is up to the individuals and individual families to handle. However, if a person wants to move out of their present Home but doesn't know the needs, or even the whereabouts, of other Homes, he obviously won't be able to move very easily, unless he decides to open his own Home. How is he going to know which Homes to write to for acceptance? By the same token, how is a Home that has a need for a person with particular gifts or skills going to know where they can find such a person, or if such a person is looking for a new Home?

       Although the CROs will not be orchestrating movement of personnel between Homes, realistically there will be a need for general assistance from the CRO. It seems that the best avenue for this would be for the CROs to regularly publish a "Want Ads" pub, or add this as a section t o their newsletters and advisories to the Homes. People in their area that want a change could write and give information about themselves, their skills, experience, etc., to see if any Homes need them. For example, "Single man with two children (ages 4 and 10), handyman, driver, good witnesser and JETT teacher, seeking a Home that needs my abilities in this or another country." Or a Home could write, "Our Home in such-and-such a city needs someone with childcare skills."

       Also, for members wis hing to move to another continental area, Want Ads could be placed in the appropriate CROs Want Ad pub, by sending an ad to their CRO to pass on to the CRO of the other area.

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       It would not be the CROs duty to solicit such information from the Homes, but simply to publish the information they receive each month. For the sake of security, those placing ads in the pub or newsletter may use their ABM as the initial contact point, or a Home can decide by a simple majority to have their postal or e-mail address or phone number printed in a Want Ad pub or the Grapevine. (See LNF 260, point 2, for additional details.)

       This Want Ads bulletin should also be used as a vehicle to update all Homes in the area of any Homes that are presently on Probationary Notice.

       Perhaps you would like to go but don't know where to go or how or when or with whom. The solution to this latter problem is going to be aided by the establishment of a ... Service Bulletin. This ... Service Bulletin wi ll act as a personnel employment agency listing available jobs and personnel for the disbursement of manpower, like the news want ads, gathering requests from the field for laborers and applications from the laborers for new jobs (ML #330A:26,27)

1. Additional assistance should be provided to single parents and their children seeking a Home.

       The CRO has no authority to demand that a Home take new members into their Home. CROs and VSs are, of course, free to approach a Home and, if necessary , ask them to consider taking in certain personnel, particularly in the case of single parents. Each Home has to make that decision of its own volition, but should, of course, act in a loving manner and pray about and consider the request. The CRO may not always be able to find a Home for someone, but they can actively try to offer assistance in this respect.

M. Assign to area officers only those duties that are in compliance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamen tal Family Rules."

       The CRO cannot ask their area officers to do something that the Charter and the Rules do not allow them to do.

N. Assume the Responsibilities and Authority of the Area Officers when visiting Homes, if necessary.

       Our CROs sometimes visit Homes, and when they do, if they find it is necessary to perform the area officer's responsibilities, they are empowered to act in a similar capacity as area officers.

O. Process Fellow Member monthly reports, and when deemed necessar y offer counsel and assistance.

       The CROs may offer counsel to Fellow Members when they feel it's necessary, although their main responsibility and obligation is to the Charter Family.

25. AUTHORITY OF CONTINENTAL OFFICERS

The continental office is authorized to:

A. Appoint officers above the Home officer level, only at levels established by WS leadership.

       The CROs have the authority to appoint the shepherds above the Home officer level. This means they do not have the right to appoint Home shepherds (other than in Service Homes, or Homes in sensitive countries).

       CROs can only appoint area officers at leadership levels set by World Services, which at present are t he Visiting Servants (VSs).

1. The continental office must inform WS leadership of all area officer appointments.

2. Officers appointed by the continental office must have their appointment confirmed by a simple majority of the Homes, in a vote of confirmation by Home referendum to be held on specified dates in accordance with the Election Rules.

       CROs are responsible to inform WS leadership of all appointments of area officers. And although we feel it would be rare, WS leadership reserve s the right to annul any area officer appointment.

       These area officers (VSs) must undergo a vote of confirmation twice a year on the dates specified in the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules." The voting procedures for such a vote of confirmation are handled as a Home referendum, which is specifically laid out in the "Fundamental Family Rules." VSs that the Homes confirm on these semi-annual confirmation dates may continue in their position; those who are not confirmed must be rem oved from office.

B. Replace area officers, provided they first receive approval from WS leadership.

       The continental officers have the right to replace any of the area officers but they first must receive WS leadership approval. And when seeking approval, the CROs will be expected to explain why they wish to replace them. Of course, if the Homes do not confirm the area officer then the continental office must replace them, and in such a case would not need prior WS approval.

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C . Appoint Area Business Managers (ABMs) to help supply administrative services for the continental area.

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       CROs are responsible to appoint ABMs to help coordinate communications and other administrative services for the Homes in the continental area. An ABM is not an area officer, unless also specifically appointed as a VS.. Nevertheless, their responsibilities will be determined by the CROs and will vary from area to area depending on the help needed by the continental office and t he needs of the field.

D. Communicate with the officers and Homes within their continental area.

E. Convene, or approve the convening of, meetings and seminars to which delegates are invited.

       CROs have the authority to convene meetings such as JETT and teen camps, delegates meetings, childcare seminars, etc., and to invite delegates to attend such meetings. Delegates would include: JETTs, JETT shepherds and others who would attend a JETT camp; Home representatives who attend a delegates meeting; Teachers who attend a seminar for teachers, etc.

       Meetings such as JETT camps, seminars, and delegates meetings can be offered as a service to the Homes by the CROs and VSs. Attending such meetings can involve considerable expense for travel and other costs, plus the added factor of having personnel away from the Home. It is therefore up to the Homes to consider these factors and decide if they wish to send delegates to attend such meetings. Attendance at meetings and seminars convened by the CROs and/or VSs is not mandatory, but voluntary, though recommended when possible.

       Area officers may also convene meetings and seminars, but only with CRO approval.

F. Make disbursals from WS finances held by them, only for the specified purposes for which the finances have been allocated by World Services.

       CROs sometimes receive from World Services funds allocated for various purposes, and once received are authorized to disburse them. Authorization is only for those purposes for which the funds have been allotted.

G. Decide, in counsel with WS leadership, all matters regarding registration of any form of organization or association, whether in the name of the Family or as an affiliate of the Family, of Family Homes or individuals.

H. Establish area goals within the continental area, in accordance with the Basic Responsibilities of the Charter Home, E. and the Election Rules, D. 2.

I. Open, operate or close Service Homes, in accordance with the Procedures for B ecoming a Service Home.

J. Decide if a Home may be opened in a city that already has a Charter Home if there is disagreement between the Homes in the city and the area office, in accordance with Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home, C. 1.

K. Grant or deny clearance to members requesting to move to any country within their continental area, in accordance with Responsibilities of Continental Officers, J.

L. Temporarily suspend a member's Right of Mobilit y, with WS leadership approval, if the member had a major responsibility in getting the Home placed on Probationary Notice, and turns in his 30-day notice prior to the Home being put on Probationary Notice.

M. Designate cities as "closed" cities, providing they have obtained authorization from WS leadership, in accordance with Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home, A.

N. Recommend the designating or revoking of sensitive country status, in accordance with the Procedures for Designating or Revoking Sensitive Country Status.

O. Withdraw a member's permission to remain in any country within their continental area, in accordance with the Procedures for Withdrawing Permission to Remain in a Country unless:

1. The voting member is a national or holds a passport of the country.

2. The member is a spouse or child of a national or a passport holder of the country.

P. Recommend personnel for Fellow Member status, in accordance with the Procedur e for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status.

Q. Put Homes on Probationary Notice, in accordance with the Procedures for Placing a Home on Probationary Notice.

R. Judge all matters concerning excommunication and partial excommunication.

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S. Due to worldwide currency fluctuations, the continental office will decide the exchange rate for local currencies in each continental area.

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       The continental officers will determine and notify the Homes of the exchange rate for the local currency for the minimum tithe, FAF, HER, pioneer, passed on and Tool fund gifts, baby bonuses, etc. They will also pay special gifts received for Homes in their area based on the exchange rate they have set. This exchange rate may change from time to time, based on currency fluctuations. If the rate changes the Homes will be notified of such by their continental office. For example, if the exchange rate for Japanese yen is presently set by the continental office at ¥140 to o ne U.S. dollar, but the yen over a period of time changes to ¥130 to the dollar, the continental office is authorized to adjust the rate used for Family financial transactions in their area accordingly.

26. RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF AREA OFFICERS

       Area officers are non-WS officers appointed by the continental office, and subject to the approval of WS leadership. A Home referendum on the confirmation of area officers must be held in accordance with the Election Rules in the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       The area officers are appointed by the continental office, and are subject to WS leadership's approval. Area officers must be confirmed twice each year on specified dates as outli ned in the Election Rules, C. 2. This does not mean that the Homes elect area officers, they only vote to confirm or not to confirm them.

       For example, if the continental office appoints an area officer (Visiting Servant), the VS can begin his duties immediately, providing WS approves the appointment. Then, depending on when the next vote of confirmation is held, this VS may visit the Homes for a few months before the date arrives for the Homes to vote on his confirmation. At the vote of confir mation, if the Homes confirm the VS' appointment, then he will remain a VS for the next six months until the next vote of confirmation, unless the continental office has reason to dismiss him from his duties. If you are unhappy with your Visiting Servant, you can vote against confirmation. If a simple majority of the Homes vote the same way, then the Visiting Servant will be replaced.

Area officers are responsible to:

A. Fulfill the Obligations of All Family Officers.

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B. Supp ly Home visitation services for their area.

       One of the main reasons for developing the Charter was to allow each Home to govern itself without much, if any, outside help from leadership. Visitation by overseers is not a right granted to the Homes by the Charter. Since the number of VSs will be limited, it remains to be seen how much visitation they will be able to undertake.

       Homes and their members must assume the responsibility for management of their affairs, and not expect their VSs to so rt things out for them. We need to move away from Homes and individuals constantly looking to leaders to tell them what to do or to answer all of their questions. You must look more to the Lord for answers, as it is just not humanly possible for your leaders to handle the myriad of decisions that our Homes worldwide face.

       The Charter is a guide to help you know how to govern your Home, how to make decisions and how to sort out problems. You've been given a great deal in the way of rights, and it is also clearly stated what your responsibilities are, so it's now up to you to apply this to your life and to your Home. It is therefore vitally important that you study the Charter, and if some problem or question comes up, you should endeavor to solve or answer it according to the Word within the parameters of the Charter.

       When the Visiting Servants come for a visit, you are expected to welcome them and to treat them with hospitality and respect. They are there as representatives of your continental office and their intent is to be a help to you.

C. Carry out duties assigned to them by the continental office.

       The continental office will be the one to assign the area officers their specific duties.

D. Regularly keep the continental office informed of their personal activities, and the general activities of their area.

E. Determine major decisions by a simple majority vote of their teamwork of officers. In the event of a tie vote, the officers must submit the question to their continental office.

       Because our leadership positions are teamworks, there is no one individual that has sole authority or responsibility. Major decisions facing the area office must therefore be made by a majority vote of the area officers after prayer and discussion about the matter. Not every matter has to be decided upon by voting, but major ones that affect the overall area and/or teamwork do need to be decided in counsel and prayer together.

F. Attempt to settle, by prayer and counsel, any matters between their area's Homes that the Homes are not able to resolve.

       Although the Homes should be able to settle most matters that may come up between them on their own, there may be times when they can't. In such cases, the area officers can be called upon to try to help settle them.

G. When visiting a Home, offer advice and counsel to help them progress spiritually, physically or organizationally, as well as advice on the well being of the members, including children. How and if such advice is implemented must be agreed upon by a simple majority of the Home.

       Area officers may and should point things out to the Homes when visiting, and give them tips and counsel on any subject to help them progress and to take good care of their members. Such counsel does not need to be enacted unless the Home agrees to do so. However, if the area officers find that your Home is falling short in some aspect of the Charter or the "Fundamental Family Rules," and they point thi s out to the Home, the Home is expected to make whatever changes are suggested. If not, they are in jeopardy of being placed on Probationary Notice

       The VSs may make suggestions to the teamwork regarding ways to help the personnel in the Home become happier or to overcome problems. It is within their authority to recommend to the teamwork that someone in the Home be placed on Probationary Status if they feel it is necessary. Placing a member on Probationary Status is a Home decision, though, so the area officer can't enact it, but only recommend it.

       The Visiting Servants are merely to express our opinions and remind you of the Word and the Letters and the laws of God already set down in love, and to lovingly guide and counsel you from the direction of your World leadership and the Lord's, the Letters' leadership, our leadership (ML #1209:51).

       It's not up to the visitor to make the decisions, it is up to the visitor, evangelist, preacher, prophet, etc., simply to preach the Word. ... Whether it's the Bible or MO Letters, give'm the Word, and then let them make their own decisions. They're supposed to be able to tell the people what to do, what the Word says to do, and to guide them spiritually, counsel them spiritually, advise them spiritually. But then people have to make their own decision (ML #1002:101,109).

H. Check on the Home's financial status, and as such, have the authority to audit their records and finances.

       An area officer can ask the Home about their f inancial status, and can, if deemed necessary, inspect the Home's financial records, including confirming the amount of Home funds on hand.

       Audit their books and see where the money is going , why and what for and how much income they've got and why not. (ML #701:44).

I. Determine, through visitation, observation and investigation, as well as discussion with Home members, whether a Home and/or individuals within the Home are fulfilling the Responsibilities of Individual Members and/or the Responsibilities of the Charter Home.

1. Upon discovery of an individual who is not fulfilling the Responsibilities of Individual Members, area officers must begin the Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status.

2. Upon discovery of a Home which is not fulfilling the Responsibilities of the Charter Home, area officers must begin the Procedures for Placing a Home on Probationary Notice.

       When the area officers pay a visit to a Home, they are supposed to observe, invest igate and talk with Home members, among other reasons to determine if the Home and the Home members are fulfilling their responsibilities.

       If an individual member is not fulfilling the Responsibilities of Individual Members, the area officer has the option of suggesting to the Home that the member be put on Probationary Status, which is subject to the Home's final decision, as covered in Procedures for Placing a Member on Probationary Status.

       If the offense is more serious and appears to war rant it, the area officer has the authority and must begin the Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status.

       Or if a whole Home is errant, the area officer can likewise begin the Procedures for Putting a Home on Probationary Notice.

       Or if the area officer encounters a member who has been accused of committing an excommunicable offense, the area officer is likewise authorized to and must take action, as outlined in the following clause.

       For details on the various options— that is, Probationary Status, Fellow Member Status, Probationary Notice and Excommunication—please see the Procedures section of the Charter.

       Just admonish them in love the first time, but if they won't take the hint then give'm "the word with the bark on it" ... and warn'm. If they still won't take it, God's Word says, "After the first and second admonition cast them out." That's Scripture, that's the Bible, that's Christian, that's Apostolic, that's Jesus and His Own laws! So don't tell u s we're being too hard or anything. (Titus 3:10; Matthew 18:15-17.) (ML #1202:55.)

J. Investigate all accusations of excommunicable offenses, and report their findings to the continental office.

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       In some cases, investigation of an excommunicable offense can be waived. (See Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members, B. 2. a.)

K. Give approval for a Home to open in a city that already has a Charter Home, providing there is agreement between the Homes in the city and the are a officers, in accordance with the Procedures for Opening a Home in a City that Already Has a Charter Home.

27. RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF HOME OFFICERS

       Being a Home teamworker is one of the most difficult jobs in the Family. The Home teamworks are the backbone of the Home. Their love, diligence and good business and personnel management can help create a successful Home, and the lack of these attributes can break a Home. God bless you faithful ones who have accepted such a challenging and demanding job!

       Our greatest need will be good leaders who are concerned for their flocks!—Good shepherds who will lay down their lives for their sheep! Are you one of these? (ML #154:11.)

       A chief executive or Colony leader should only be a guide, who in turn is guided himself by God. ... They are also to be largely guided by the people! (ML #263:45.)

The Home officers are responsible to:

A. Fulfill the Obligations of All Family Officers.

       Home teamworkers are also Family officers who must endeavor to fulfill the basic obligations of all shepherds and leaders in the Family.

B. Manage, care for and shepherd the Home and its members, physically, spiritually and organizationally, and endeavor to ensure that they are fulfilling the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and following the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       The Home teamwork is responsible to shepherd the Home and to do all they can to ensure the Home members are happy, well cared-for and loved. They must also diligently manage the Home so that it functions well organizationally, allowing everyone to effectiv ely and efficiently do their job. The Home members have a great deal of say in the management of their Home, and they elect the Home teamwork, which is expected to carry out the agreed-upon decisions.

       Home members are expected to respect and cooperate with the Home teamwork. They must also obey the teamwork in the matters that the teamwork has been given the authority over, either by the Charter or by the Home. Please do all you can to help uphold your teamwork, as you have chosen them as your Home shepherds.

       Our leaders will no longer be called "advisors" and "supervisors," but "shepherds," to remind them constantly of their responsibility to tenderly and lovingly care for their flocks, and feed and protect their sheep, and nurse and cherish the sick and afflicted. ... (ML #176:62.)

       One of the signs of a good leader is always keeping your eyes open and checking to see that everything is running smoothly—that the snags are all ironed out—that everything is getting done that s hould be done! (ML #22:5.)

C. Lovingly and faithfully correct and discipline individuals who fail to fulfill, or who violate or contravene the Responsibilities of Individual Members, or the "Fundamental Family Rules," and any agreed-upon Home regulations, in a manner appropriate and proportionate to the offense.

1. If the offending member does not agree that the discipline is appropriate or proportionate, he may bring the matter before the Home's officers. If an agreement cannot be reached , the Home's officers must convene a Home council meeting within three days to settle the matter. If a simple majority agree with the Home's officers, the discipline is to be carried out. If the majority disagree, an alternative discipline must be found and agreed upon.

       A Home's teamwork must have the authority to discipline those in the Home who are not abiding by the Charter or the Rules, or even the Home regulations enacted by the Home. The discipline must be appropriate and proportionate i n each case. Often a verbal admonishment will suffice for the first offense. The definition of admonishment is "a gentle but earnest reproof or warning." You will notice we didn't use the term rebuke, which means "to criticize or reprove sharply," neither did we say reprimand, which means "a severe, formal, or official rebuke or censure." If you have to correct someone verbally, please do so lovingly, even if it must be firmly.

       Some examples of discipline that a teamwork may need to enact incl ude: assigning extra duties like dishwashing; loss of Home responsibilities; temporarily relinquishing an activity or privilege, such as missing a movie or an outing, etc. It is also a good idea to assign an appropriate reading list to help strengthen the Home member.

       As mentioned elsewhere, the Home has the authority to vote in its own Home regulations as long as these do not contravene the Charter or "Fundamental Family Rules." But in doing so, each Home member must understand that he is exp ected to abide by those regulations once they are implemented, and that the Home teamwork will have the authority to discipline those who disobey them.

       Whenever discipline is assigned, it must be appropriate and proportionate to the offense. If the offense was very minor, then the correction must reflect this same degree of disciplinary action. If the teamwork assigns a form of discipline which the offender feels is not appropriate or feels is excessive for the offense, he can discuss the matt er with them.

       The Home teamwork should hear out the member as to the reasons why he feels the discipline is not appropriate or proportionate. The member should also listen to the teamwork's reasons for their choice of discipline. Both sides should prayerfully and lovingly consider the reasons of the other.

       If an agreement on the disciplinary action cannot be reached, the teamwork must call a Home council meeting within three days to settle the matter. Both sides should be heard in the meetin g and the Home should discuss it and come to a decision by means of a majority vote.

       Give these wisdom, great wisdom and firmness, Lord, conviction, great love, but to be willing to be firm in love with what's right, in Jesus' name (ML #1467:106).

       With a lot of people's problems, you can just talk to them a little bit and you tell them the solution and they want to do better and they repent and change. With others, you talk to them and you pray with them and perhaps there's a short-lived v ictory, but then the problem returns over and over again. When there is that kind of problem, I think there needs to be something more than just talking and talking and praying and praying with them (ML #1887:2).

       But we must be sure that [correction is] in the right spirit with the meekness and the quietness of a tender and gentle and loving and contrite heart in all humility.—To be sure that we're in the right spirit as we correct those around us for their mistakes and their errors and their sins, even as God does us and as we would want others to do unto us for ours.—Loving and forgiving one another for Christ's sake, even as He hath forgiven us for our sins (ML #1250:43).

D. Recommend that a Home member be placed on Probationary Status, in accordance with the Procedures for Placing a Member on Probationary Status.

E. Recommend that a Home member be moved to Fellow Member status, in accordance with the Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status.

F. Im mediately report any accusations of excommunicable offenses to the area and continental offices.

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       If someone within a Home reports that a Home member has committed an excommunicable offense, the Home teamwork must immediately report it to both the area office and the continental office, who will investigate the matter speedily, unless the person being excommunicated agrees to waive the investigation and accept the sentence of the continental office.

G. Bring up all matters submi tted for discussion or vote in a Home council meeting within 15 days.

       As each voting member has the right to bring matters up for discussion in the appropriate Home council meeting, and to have it brought to a vote in 15 days, it is the responsibility of the teamwork to make sure that all such matters are voted on within that time frame.

       So we all need to work together, we need to listen to each other, counsel together, agree together, decide together and then work it out together.—That i t might "seem good to all of them," and that we might agree and work together as the Spirit leads, if we're going to get the job done, and when and where it is most needed (ML #263:76,80).

PROCEDURES

       Numerous times throughout the Charter you have read "in accordance with the procedures for. ..." This Procedures section of the Charter outlines the step-by-step detailed instructions for these various procedures and how they are to be followed. When you or your Home or leadership is faced with following one of these procedures, you will be able to do so in a very orderly fashion, and everyone involved will know exactly what is expected. All Family members will have the same stan dard, and will be speaking the same thing, and will know exactly what needs to be done if these procedures are followed closely. We pray they are a blessing to you.

       Because these procedures are precise in their instructions, and in most cases there has already been some explanation of the purpose behind them, it will not be necessary to add much in the way of explanation as we have in previous sections.

28. PROCEDURES FOR ACCEPTING NEW DISCIPLES INTO A CHARTER HOME

       When a person joins the Charter Family, he or she moves into a Charter Home and becomes an integral part and influence on the Home that they join, and eventually on other Homes as well. Thus someone accepted as a new disciple into a Charter Home must meet certain general criteria.

A. The final decision of whether and when a potential disciple is accepted into the Charter Family rests with the Home that the new disciple join s. Acceptance is determined by a two-thirds majority vote, providing all the requirements listed in point B. of this section have been met, and the Home has prayed and received confirmation from the Lord.

       Taking a new disciple into the Charter Family is an important decision that should be made in united prayer and counsel with the whole Home. It is imperative to always seek the Lord for His approval and confirmation through prophecy, visions or verses, asking the Lord to clearly and specifica lly speak, putting His stamp of approval on it.—Or to stop you if He doesn't want that person to join as a full-time Charter Member. Since you are making the final decision to allow this person to join—not just your Home but the overall Family—receiving such confirmation from the Lord is extremely important.

       Some factors the Home will want to take into consideration are:

       —The degree of the prospective disciple's commitment and desire to reach others for Jesus

       —Their background, includ ing any serious problems that would hinder their service for the Lord

       —Their legal situation: marital obligations, military obligations, etc.

       —Any problems with relatives or associates

       —Their financial obligations and debts

       —Health and any medical concerns

       We should never let these guys in the door to move in until we know something about them and we've got a real conviction that they've really got the goods! It's a whole lot harder to get rid of them than it is to take them in. ... The Colony Council has to get together and talk to the guy before they can even accept them. The Council has to set the standards and the rules and they've got to make the decision on who's accepted in the number (ML #334A:55,59).

       If you ever need discernment, it's when you take new people into your Colonies! Have a meeting with your Colony Council and look him [the potential disciple] over and talk to him (ML #734:30,36).

       We are an army! We're not only an army, but we're training the of ficers of the army! We're the toughest officer's training school there is, and that's what you've got to remember! We're not looking for just any kind of disciples. We're looking for the right kind who are going to make good fighters and good officers (ML #334A:17,18).

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1. If a prospective member has been previously excommunicated, the continental office must give its approval before the prospective member can rejoin a Charter Member Home.

2. In some cases the Home may decide tha t it is wise to wait for a substantial period of time before accepting a new member into their Home, whereas in other cases they may allow them to join immediately.

       As you'll note, no time frame is given before someone is allowed to join a Charter Home as a full-time member. So we're not ruling out the possibility of some people wanting to join immediately, but before they cut all worldly ties, forsake all and become fully integrated into the Charter Family, it would be best to have a period o f time to get to know the Family better. This would also allow the Home to have more opportunity to get to know the prospective disciple. If all the following requirements are met and two-thirds of the Home's voting members agree, an individual may join a Charter Home as a full-time member.

       [With potential new disciples] that's when you need a little discernment, and in the absence of that, they need to pray for it! If they ever need discernment it's when they take people into their Colonies (ML #334A:56,57).

       Of course, the time period might vary with some, it depends on the individual case and the situation. But I would say we certainly should not allow anyone to actually move in and join until every facet of their case is studied, investigated and tested, to see if it is really time for them to join. I mean it! Some cases could be allowed to join sooner than others when you find out that they're really ready and really whole-hearted and tested and tried and proven (ML #2385:68) .

B. For a person to become a new disciple they must:

1. Have received Jesus as their personal Savior and been filled with the Holy Spirit.

       A new disciple must be saved, filled with the Spirit (ML #657:26).

       I don't think anybody ought to join unless they're really filled with the Holy Spirit, because they're not going to have the power or the grace to take it (ML #334A:75).

2. Be of legal age, or if not, have notarized parental permission.

       As Dad has counseled us, we can't accep t underage new disciples unless they have notarized permission: "We cannot accept [anyone underage] without written, and preferably notarized permission. ... Please don't do it!" (ML #124:8.)

       Additionally, though a person may be of legal age to join, in many countries around the world it is best to also consider the local customs. For example, legal age may be 18 in the country where you reside, but due to close family ties the accepted custom may be for persons to remain with their parents un til marriage or the age of 21 or more.

       For this reason, the Home may find it wise to initiate communication with the parents and/or close relatives of prospective new disciples of all ages to make sure they have a basic understanding of the Family, to answer any questions, and to avoid misunderstandings. If the parents voice any major concerns, the Home might find it in their best interest to encourage the prospective disciple to be a Catacomber for a set period of time, during which time he c ould endeavor to lovingly explain his new-found faith and commitment and help his parents to overcome their concerns at his desire to serve the Lord with the Family.

       The local Family might want to meet with any concerned close parents/relatives or associates and explain the work to them before the prospective member is allowed to join. If parents and associates still disagree, the Home should pray and count the cost. If there could be potential 10:36 problems that could affect other Homes in t he area, the affected Homes should be consulted.

       Many, many, many of our people were Catacombers for several years before their parents allowed them to join. At least that gives the parents a little more time to get used to the idea. ... If in spite of time and parental opposition and every other obstacle to test them and their faith, they still hang on as Catacombers and they still come and visit and they're still participating in meetings, and you have time to really test them to see if th ey've got the real stuff, you're a whole lot safer in the long run!... They need to take time to be time-tested, to be Family-tested, with time for their parents to get acquainted and used to the idea, to see that their child is determined, is not going to give up, until the parents finally give in! (ML #2385:57,60,61.)

3. Have a basic understanding of the Family, its goals, way of life, and believe that David was God's Endtime Prophet and that Maria is God's chosen and anointed successor, wh o has inherited David's mantle, as God's Prophetess.

       In order to ensure that the prospective new disciple has a clear basic understanding of the Family, we would suggest they should have read at least the following Family publications or portions of Scripture, and discussed any questions with the Home teamwork or responsible shepherds:

       "Growing in Love"

       "Growing in Faith"

The following Basic Statements:

       "Family Origins"

       "Statement of Faith"

       "Loving Jesus Revelation"

       "Christ-Cent ered Bible-Based Education"

       "Our Support"

       "Religious Persecution"

       The Gospel of John

       The Book of Acts, Chapters 1-10, as well as "Acts 1-10!" (ML #1383) from DB 1 or GN Bk.3.

       Responsibilities of Individual Members in the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights"

       "Fundamental Family Rules" 1-11

       If Growing in Love is not translated into your local language but Treasures is, the prospective new disciple may read the shorter, edited versions of these articles in Treasures. (The Treasure s version of "Why the Bible?" is entitled "The Most Amazing Book!," and the Treasures version of "Whose Fool Are You?" is entitled "Why Evolution?")

       To become a Revolutionary for Jesus: You must study and learn these Bible beliefs and rules prayerfully, accept and promise to obey them before you join (ML #S:14).

       I just believe in being honest and fair with the people and letting them know how hard it's going to be so they have a choice to get out of it before they get into it (ML #334A:73) .

       These new babes must have the same Salvation, the same power of the Spirit, the same motivation, the same desire to forsake all, and the same total dedication to serve Jesus! They must abide by the same rules of the revolutionary articles of war, which are the same for both officers and men, from generals to privates (ML #60:56).

4. Show a sincere interest in reading God's Word and desire to engage in evangelism.

       They [spiritual babes] should be so hungry for the pure milk of the Word , that if you show them where it's at, they should devour it, drink it in, the pure, sincere milk of the Word! (1Peter 2:2.) (ML #752:21.)

       A lack of hunger and desire for the Word shows they may not be truly born!... True babes will be hungry! (ML #2415:3.)

       If they're willing to witness on the spot to their friends and classmates and work mates and boss and family, that's their first witness and that's the acid test. And if they can't take that, I doubt if they're going to be strong enough t o stay in the Family (ML #1881:17).

5. Have a sincere desire to dedicate their life to serving Jesus with the Family.

       If ... they're not absolutely convinced of the righteousness of our cause enough to want to do or die daily to love people, we don't want them! We should never let these guys move in until we know something about them and we've got a real conviction that they've really got the goods! (ML #657:26.)

       When people join our Family ... they're going to have to live like they se e the Family living, and they're going to have to witness like they see the person witnessing who witnessed to them! They're going to have to win souls like they were won! They're going to have to live by faith like the Family lives! They're going to have to suffer persecution like the Family suffers! (ML #2232:35.)

6. Have lived in a Charter Home for a minimum of 20 days.

       Having them come in and live with you is even better than a probation period where they just come in every day and st udy. You can never find out as much about what they're like then. It doesn't mean a thing just because they're good on paper with pencils and they can sit there in class singing, "La-di-da-di-da!" and shout "Hallelujah!" But if they come in and have to take part in the duties and the rough stuff, then you find out what they're like real fast! (ML #334A:42.)

       People's first reactions are sometimes euphoric, and then boom!—They find out it wears off and they either get bored or tired or don't li ke it and would rather go back where they came from. They join with euphoric dreamlike ideas of the Family and then they find out it comes down to just plain ordinary brass tacks and hard work, and the aura wears off when it gets down to the real hard work of cleaning toilets and washing dishes and litnessing and whatnot. If they don't really love the Lord and if it's not really forsake-all because they want to serve the Lord, if they just had some idea that it might be a nice way to live and it might be fun, then they don't stick and they go back. It's going to be just as hard work, if not harder, than school or job or living at home or whatever else they were trying to escape from, even mates and family! (ML #1654:1-4.)

7. Be free from substance abuse and/or the use of illegal or illicit drugs.

       We talk about rehabilitation from drugs and crime, but we specialize in the kind [of people] who get instant deliverance through Jesus Christ right on the spot before they join!—Not th ose we have to fiddle around with for years after they join, trying to get them to get the victory (ML #334A:26).

8. Be free from contagious disease.

       A prospective new disciple needs to report his health and medical condition to the Home. Some might have a disease that would seriously hinder their ability to actively serve the Lord as a Charter disciple, and it might be best that they not join as a Charter Member. Someone who has diabetes and uses insulin may still be an active member of a Charter Home, while someone who has leukemia and needs regular hospital treatment might find it more difficult to serve the Lord effectively in a Charter Home. The final decision would rest with the Home, except in the case of a serious illness; since that situation could affect the overall work in that area, the Home teamwork should counsel with their area officer. A prospective new disciple with a contagious disease should not be permitted to move into the Home, of course.

       We should have s ome kind of physical examination for new disciples. We examine them spiritually before we take them in, why not physically? This would not be with the idea of refusing them, but to have immediate and definite prayer about any physical problems they have, and ask the Lord to deliver them before they spread anything contagious to the rest of the camp (ML #155:57).

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9. Test negative for AIDS before moving into the Home, and again test negative after a six-month period.

       Potential new disciples must provide medical documentation to prove that an AIDS test was taken before moving into the Home. Anyone who has AIDS or is HIV-positive would not be able to live in a Charter Home.

       All new disciples must take an AIDS test before they are allowed to move in with us! If their test proves negative, they may move into our Homes, but they must abstain from sex with others for their first six months in the Family, after which they take a second AIDS test to make sure they are clear. (DB7, page 500.)

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10. Take a test for sexually transmitted diseases.

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       A prospective new disciple should also take a test for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) to make sure that he or she is free from them. Since the new disciple cannot have sex during the first six months in the Home, he or she could be permitted to join the Home even with a STD (other than HIV or AIDS), providing the STD is being treated. However, he or she would need to be test free of sexually transmitted diseases before being allowed to share with other Charter Members once his first six months are complete. In the case of herpes, after becoming a voting member he or she could share with other Charter Members providing precautions are taken as per Sex and Affection Rules, N.

11. Have no debts.

       In exceptional circumstances, a Home may, by two-thirds agreement of the voting members, agree to take on the liabilities of new disciples—such as vehicle payments, student loan, etc. Generally, though, the rule has always been that a new disciple "must be free of debts, payments, and family or legal obligations. 'Owe no man anything, save to love him'" (ML #S:7).

12. Have no legal or military obligations that would prevent them from being a full-time member of a Charter Home.

       There are some legal situations, which might not interfere with Charter membership, such as jury duty or obligatory public service for a traffic violation. In some countries, a short term of military service is obligatory for certain ages, and they may still be able to attend to this requirement without too much disruption in their service to the Lord; in which case the Home could agree to accept them according to the circumstances.

       We cannot accept ... those with legal problems which might endanger your whole Colony. We cannot risk the whole army for one soldier's personal problems! Doing so can get your whole work in trouble and give it a bad name with the authorities and turn them against yo u (ML #124:8; #156C:8).

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C. Upon completing the above qualifications, the new disciple should complete the Personal Data for New Disciples Form, a copy of which should be sent to the continental office with the Home's monthly report. The new disciple is then classified as a "babe" and should be listed on the Home's monthly report as a Home member.

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D. Upon moving into a Charter Home, a new disciple must list his or her assets (cash and personal possessions) using the As set Declaration for New Charter Members. The assets listed on this declaration will remain his or her property to take with them should he or she decide to leave before completing six months in the Family, unless they decide to leave some of these assets with the Family.

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       New disciples who decide not to join the Family at any point during the first six months will be permitted to take with them any personal possessions that they have listed on their Asset Declaration for New Charte r Members. (See Appendix B.) The exception being that new disciples would only take whatever part of their cash assets that the Home and they agreed the new disciple would take with them should they leave the Family before becoming a Charter voting member. For example, if a new disciple joins a Home with $10,000, the new disciple and the Home should agree how much of the $10,000 would be kept for the new disciple should he or she decide to leave the Family before finishing their Babes Course and becoming a Charter member, and what part the new disciple would give to the Home to use at the beginning of his or her Babes training.

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E. Refrain from any sexual activity during their first six months in the Family.

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1. New disciples joining as a couple may continue to have sex together during this period.

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2. Towards the end of their first six months in the Family, new disciples must read through the "Living the Lord's Law of Love" GN series. Only upon c ompletion of the series, and the other requirements in point F. below, can they begin to have sexual activity with other Charter Members.

       In addition to the Letters on Sex in the Basic Babes Course, near the end of their first six months in the Family new disciples must read through the "Living the Lord's Law of Love" GN series (published in Lifelines 25), in order to get a full understanding of their responsibilities in sexual relationships. Only upon completing the reading of this series can they begin having sex with others, providing of course their first six months are over and they've taken a second AIDS test.

F. After living in a Charter Home for six consecutive months, completing the reading of the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and "Fundamental Family Rules," and the Babes Basic Course, and having taken a second AIDS test with negative results, if a simple majority of the Homes voting members agree, they will become a Charter Member with voting rights. (See Clas sifications of Family Membership and Literature, and Priority Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family, for other appropriate reading material for babes.)

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       Once a new disciple has completed their six months training, he or she becomes a full voting Charter Member. They should complete in triplicate and sign the Statement of Commitment for New Disciples Form. (See Appendix B.) An original copy of this commitment form should be given to the new member, with copies given to the Home and the area office. For legal reasons, you might find it beneficial to have this notarized in some countries. To be legally recognized, in some countries a signature needs to be witnessed and notarized, whereas in other countries this would not be necessary.

1. Once the new disciple becomes a voting member, an agreement should be reached between the Home and the new member as to which of his or her possessions the new member would be permitted to take with him or her if he or she s hould decide to leave the Home.

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       At the point of becoming a new voting member of the Home, an agreement should be reached between the Home and the new member as to which of his or her possessions the new member would be permitted to take with him or her if he or she should decide to leave or move to another Home. This is the same procedure as for a Charter Member joining a Home (see Right of Mobility, D. 7.). During their time as a member of the Home, however, Acts 2:44-45 fully ap plies in that he or she should willingly give and share of all his or her possessions with others. (See Responsibilities of Individual Members, J.)

2. Although new disciples do not have the Right of Mobility until they become voting members, the continental office may authorize the member's movement to a different Home if deemed necessary or expedient.

29. PROCEDURES FOR ACCEPTING YOUNG RETURNEES BACK INTO A CHARTER HOME

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A. Members ages 14 through 20, who have been out of the Charter Family for less than six weeks, may rejoin the Charter Home they left from without losing their voting rights (for those 16 and older) or having to complete the Procedures for Accepting New Disciples into a Charter Home.

1. Special exemptions may be given by the continental or area office for the returnee to rejoin a different Home from the one they left, providing a two-thirds majority of the new Home has voted in favor of receiving the new returnee.

a) For those under 16, legal permission of at least one parent is required for the returnee to rejoin a different Home from the one they left.

B. Upon returning to the Charter Home, they must:

1. Read the first five sections of the Basic Letters for Babes.

2. Show a sincere interest in reading God's Word.

3. Have a sincere desire to engage in evangelism and dedicate their l ife to serving Jesus with the Family.

4. Give their material possessions to the Home they join, with the understanding that they will permanently relinquish them, with the exception of those things the Home decides the returnee needs to keep.

5. Be free from substance abuse and/or the use of illegal or illicit drugs.

6. Be free from contagious disease.

7. Test negative for the HIV virus before moving back into the Home, and again test negative after a six-month period.

8. Refrain from any sexual activity until they are deemed free of the HIV virus after their second AIDS test.

9. Take a test for sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and refrain from any sexual activity until they have tested free of any sexually transmitted diseases, other than herpes.

10. For those 16 and over: Forfeit their Right of Mobility until the second AIDS test at six months shows that they are clear of the HIV virus.

a) The area or continental office may authorize the young returnee mem ber to move to another Home, providing the area office first notifies the member's receiving Home that he must refrain from any sexual activity until the second AIDS test, taken six months after his return, shows that returnee is clear of the HIV virus.

11. Have no debts. Any debts incurred while outside the Home must first be paid off before rejoining.

a) The Home may decide, by a two-thirds majority, to take in a returning member who has debts, with the understanding that the member woul d work on repaying their debts while in the Home.

12. Have no legal obligations, which would prevent them from being a full-time member of a Charter Home.

       In accordance with ML# 2942, "When Teens Leave the Family," teens or YAs who return to the Charter Family after having been out for no more than six weeks will need to fulfill the stipulations above.

30. PROCEDURES FOR MOVING FELLOW MEMBERS TO CHARTER MEMBER STATUS

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A. If a Fellow Member Home wants to return to Charter Member status as their own Home, they must notify the continental office of their desire to do so. In their letter, the Fellow Members should explain their history and why they were reclassified. At this time they should also request a copy of the "Love Charter" if they do not already have one.

B. If, after reading the Charter and prayerful consideration, the Fellow Member Home determines that it would like to attempt to meet the standard outlined in the Charter, they should specify on their TRF that they have read the Charter and agree to abide by it, and request permission to begin their six-month probationary period as Charter Members.

1. If the Fellow Member Home is not in good standing or ineligible for a return to Charter Member status, the continental office will inform them of the reasons why their application has been denied within 45 da ys.

2. If notification of ineligibility is not received from the continental office within 45 days, the Fellow Member Home may commence a probationary Charter period of six months.

3. All voting-age members must agree to abide by the Charter for as long as they remain in the Home.

a) If necessary, the continental office may postpone the returning Fellow Member Home's probationary period for up to an additional 60 days, during which time the Home would be visited by an area officer or de signated Charter representative to ascertain its eligibility for Charter Member status. The continental office must inform the applicant Home of this delay.

C. If all, or a majority of the Home members are rejoining as Charter Members, they have the option of remaining in their existing housing. Any members who wish to retain their Fellow Member status would need to join another Fellow Member Home or open their own Fellow Member Home.

1. If only one individual or a few members of a Fellow Member Home have been accepted to return to Charter Member status, they would need to join an existing Charter Home, or open a new Home to begin their probationary period of returning to Charter Member status. (See Procedures for Fellow Members Changing to Charter Member Status and Moving into an Existing Charter Home.)

D. During this probationary period, all voting members of the Home must complete the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication (Append ix G.), which may be ordered from their continental office, available to the Home for the printing and shipping costs. At the end of their six-month probationary period, unless an area officer or a continental office-appointed designated representative (DR) has visited and disqualified the probationary Home, they will begin a transitional Charter period lasting six months.

1. The probationary period may be shortened to three months if all the Home's voting members have completed the reading o f the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication during that time. In this case, the Home must notify their continental office that they have completed the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication. Unless they hear otherwise from their continental office, or an area officer or DR has visited and disqualified them, they will begin their transitional Charter period.

2. The continental office is responsible to supp ly the applicant Home with the Charter Member TRF form and reporting instructions.

       During the six-month transitional period the transitional Home is considered a CM Home, and should therefore use the CM TRF report and reporting procedures, and are expected to fulfill all the Charter requirements listed therein, including making monthly contributions to the FAF as well as sending in their HSEC.

E. During the six-month transitional period, they are eligible to receive CM mailings. However, th ough they are voting members in their own Home, they are not eligible to exercise the following Charter rights and privileges:

a) Right of Mobility (until they have received their confirmatory visit from a VS or DR)

b) Voting in Home referendums

c) Sex with Charter Members.

F. At the beginning of the transitional period, all voting-age members of the Home must test negative for the HIV virus and again test negative after a six-month period.

G. At some time during the transitional period, the Home must receive a visit by an area officer or DR to verify that the prospective Charter Home is living according to the Charter.

1. It is the responsibility of the continental office to ensure that an area officer or DR visits the prospective Home at some time during their transitional period.

2. The Fellow Member applicant(s) should cover the expenses of the area officer/DR visit. It will be left up to the area officer or DR to work out the details of such payments directly with the Fellow Member(s) applying for Charter Member status.

3. If the area officer or DR determine the Home is not living according to the Charter, the Home members must be told by the area officer or DR in what areas they are falling short of the Charter and what they must do to come up to the Charter standard. The Home must again begin their probationary Charter period, following the procedures from point C. above onward.

4. The HER fund should be given to the transitional Home after t hey have received their confirmatory visit from an area officer or DR.

H. Once the Home has completed their six-month transitional period, they become a full-fledged Charter Home with all the rights pertaining thereto.

31. PROCEDURES FOR FELLOW MEMBERS CHANGING TO CHARTER MEMBER STATUS AND MOVING INTO AN EXISTING CHARTER HOME

       For those Fellow Members who are in communication or fellowship with an existing Charter Home, following are the procedures whereby they may become a Charter Member:

       The Charter Home could consider having Fellow Member applicants who request to join their Home be on a probationary period of three or more months to fellowship with and witness with the Charter Home first to see if the Home wants to bring them in. The applicants could also visit and live in the Home for short periods of time to see how everyone likes each other.

       In order to proceed with allowing a Fellow Member to move in to your Charter Home, the following are the procedures to follow:

A. Two-thirds of the voting members of the Charter Home must agree to accept the applicant as a returning Charter Member.

B. The Charter Home officers must check with the continental office to verify that the Fellow Member is a member in good standing, whose past history and specific offenses do not make him ineligible for prospective Charter Member status.

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1. Unless the continental office informs the Home officers within 45 days that the Fellow Member applicant is ineligible to return to Charter Member status and must remain on Fellow Member status, the Home may proceed with implementing the Procedures for Accepting New Disciples into a Charter Home for the Fellow Member joining their Home.

a) Although members changing their status from FM to CM do not have the Right of Mobility until they become voting Charter Members, the continental office may authorize the members' movement to a different Home if deemed necessary or expedient.

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C. Upon moving into a Charter Home, the Fellow Member must list his or her personal possessions using the Asset Declaration for New Charter Members in Appendix B. The assets listed on this declaration will remain his or her property to ta ke with him or her should he or she decide to leave before completing six months in the Charter Family, unless they decide to leave some of these assets with the Charter Home.

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       Fellow Members changing to CM who decide not to remain Charter Members at any point during the first six months, will be allowed to take with them any personal possessions that they have listed on the Asset Declaration for New Charter Members in Appendix B.)

D. The applicant must complete the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication (Appendix G.). In addition to this, a returning Fellow Member is eligible to read all materials that Fellow Members are eligible for.

E. If at any time the Home deems the applicant(s) is not living up to the Charter, by two-thirds vote they are free to recommend that he returns to Fellow Member status. Such recommendation does not need to be confirmed by two levels of leadership, but the Home teamwork must notify the conti nental office of such a decision.

F. At the end of a six-month probationary period, the Home will vote to confirm if the applicant is living according to the Charter, and if so, he or she will then become a full-fledged voting Charter Member.

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1. At this point an agreement should be reached between the Home and the new member as to which of his or her possessions the new member would be authorized to take with him or her if he or she should decide to leave the Home.

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       Fellow Members changing to CM who decide to stay in the Family after their six-month probationary period become full voting Charter Members. At the point of becoming a new voting member of the Home, an agreement should be made between the Home and the new member as to which of his or her possessions the new member would be authorized to take with him or her if he or she should decide to leave the Home. This is the same procedure as for a Charter Member joining a Home (see Right of Mobility, D. 7.). During their stay in the Home, however, Acts 2:44-45 fully applies in that they should willingly give and share of all their possessions with others. (See also Responsibilities of Individual Members, J.)

32. FOR OPENING A HOME IN A CITY THAT ALREADY HAS A CHARTER HOME

A. No new Homes may be opened in cities which have been designated as closed by the continental office. Nor are members from outside of the closed city permitted to conduct outreach in the closed city.

1. Cities can only be classified as closed if the continental office writes a detailed explanation to WS leadership, giving the specific reasons why they wish to classify a certain city closed, and then receives authorizatio n for the same from WS leadership.

2. All Homes in the country must be notified that the city is classified as closed.

3. Renewed approval for classifying a city as closed must be obtained annually from WS leadership.

4. The continental office can at any time change a city's closed status if they feel it is no longer warranted, and new Homes could then open in that city. The continental office must inform all the Homes in the country of this change, as well as WS leadership.

       CROs can recommend that cities which already have Charter Homes in them be "closed" if they deem the saturation point for Homes has been reached, or for other valid reasons. If approved as a closed city, it would mean that no new Homes could open in that city, but the Homes already there would be able to remain there.

       The CROs can also recommend that a city without Charter Homes be classified as closed, if they are aware of particular circumstances, such as previous serious problems for the Family in t hat city, or other valid reasons. If approved as a closed city, no Homes may open in that city while the approval is in effect.

       If a city is closed, then members of Homes from outside that city are not permitted to conduct outreach there. Of course, if you had to go to that city for some business, you could personally witness to someone, but you should not distribute tools without the permission of the Homes in the area.

B. Homes desiring to move to a city that already has a Charter Home mu st inform the appropriate area office of their request to open a Home in that city.

1. Within 10 days of receipt of the request, the area office must inform all the Homes in that city of the petition to open a new Home.

2. Upon receipt of the petition, each Home must vote and notify the area office, within 10 days, as to whether they agree to the new Home opening. The vote must be conducted as a Home referendum, in accordance with the Election Rules, D.

3. The area office must immediate ly inform the petitioning Home of the decision.

C. The decision of the voting Homes will prevail, providing the area office is in agreement with the decision.

1. If the area office disagrees with the vote of the Homes, or in the event of a tie vote, the area office must inform the continental office of the outcome of the vote, and in the case of disagreement, the reason(s) why they disagree. A copy of the letter must be sent to each of the voting Homes, and the petitioning Home.

a) Upon receipt of the area office's letter, the voting Homes have seven days to write the continental office regarding the matter. A copy of their letter must go to the area office.

b) Upon careful and prayerful consideration of the area office and the Homes' letters, the continental office must make the decision, and notify those concerned, within 30 days, as to whether a new Home can or cannot open in the city.

33. PROCEDURES FOR BECOMING A SERVICE HOME

A. The continental office may initiate the opening of a Service Home in their continental area providing:

1. They obtain the approval of WS leadership.

2. All members invited to live in a Service Home are notified in advance that the Home is a Service Home, and informed of the basic nature of the Home and the service it will provide.

3. All members of the proposed Service Home have agreed to relinquish the rights outlined in the Rights of Personnel in a Service Home, for as long as they remain in the Service Home.

B. The continental office may grant permission for an existing Home in their continental area to become a Service Home providing:

1. They obtain the approval of WS leadership.

2. The Home agrees, by a two-thirds majority, to become a Service Home.

a) If the Home votes against the proposal, the continental office may, only with WS leadership's approval, assign the service to another Home, or open a Home to p rovide the service. If the Home is already providing a service, it must relinquish the service, the related contacts and other pertinent materials.

       If a Charter Home in the course of its activities develops a major service that affects the whole country or the international work, the CRO can propose that it become a Service Home. In such a case the CRO must first receive WS approval, and then the agreement of the Home.

       An example of an existing Home that might be a candidate for becoming a S ervice Home would be the LAMB Home, which began as a normal Home but eventually developed a service to North America, which then carried over internationally. This particular Home, in the course of their outreach activities, began ministering to various academics and lawyers in California, as well as starting a GP contact phone ministry via a toll-free number for the whole U.S., and also became heavily involved in the Ministry of Reconciliation.

       Much of the work that they did affected not only the work in their local area but soon all of the United States and beyond. Because the Home's ministries have a significant impact on the work in the U.S. and internationally, the CRO could propose that it become a Service Home. However, before it could officially become a Service Home, WS leadership would have to first agree. The Home would also need to agree by a two-thirds majority to the proposal for them to become a Service Home.

       In the event that a Home, which has a specific service, do es not want to become a Service Home, but the CRO feels that by not doing so it would greatly hinder the work, then the CRO must bring the matter to WS leadership. If WS leadership is in agreement with the CRO, the CRO may instruct the Home to turn the service and all pertinent material, such as contacts, files, etc., over to the CRO, who will pass the service on to another Home that agrees to become a Service Home. Or the CRO may initiate the opening of another Service Home for this purpose.

34. PROCEDURES FOR DESIGNATING OR REVOKING SENSITIVE COUNTRY STATUS

A. The continental office may designate a country in their continental area that does not have any Charter Homes as a sensitive country, providing:

1. They obtain the approval of WS leadership.

a) Renewed approval must be obtained annually from WS leadership.

B. The continental office may designate a country in their continental area that has Charter Homes as a sensitive country, providing:

1. They obtain the approval of WS leadership.

a) Renewed approval must be obtained annually from WS leadership.

2. A simple majority of the Homes in the proposed sensitive country agree, by a Home referendum, that the country should be classified as a sensitive country.

a) If the result of the referendum turns out to be against the country being classified as a sensitive country, the country will temporarily be classified as sensitive until such time as WS leadership makes a final decision.

(1) The continental office must immediately write WS leadership informing them of the referendum's outcome. The Homes that voted against the measure may also write WS leadership explaining their objection to the measure.

b) After thoughtful and prayerful consideration, WS leadership will make the decision.

3. All members who are invited to, given clearance to, or are already in a sensitive country must be informed by the continental office that the country is a sensitive country, and have the basic nature, goals, direction and operating procedures explained to them.

C. To remain in, or be given clearance to, a sensitive country, members must agree to relinquish the rights outlined in the Rights of Personnel in a Sensitive Country, if the continental office deems it necessary, for as long as they remain in the sensitive country.

D. Sensitive country status may be revoked providing either the continental office or the Home(s) in the sensitive country ask for a Home referendum to be conducted to determine if the country should remain a sensitive country. Once petitioned, the continental office must conduct a Home referendum within 60 days.

1. If the Homes, by a simple majority, vote that the country should no longer be a sensitive country, following the Home referendum procedures outlined in the Election Rules, and the continental office agrees, the country is no longer classified a sensitive country.

2. If the continental office disagrees with the Homes' vote, the continental office must write WS leadership informing them of the outcome of the vote and the reasons why they disagree with the vote. A copy of this letter must be sent to each of the voting Homes and the appropriate area office.

a) Upon receipt of this letter, the voting Homes and the area office have 30 days to write WS leadership regarding the matter.

3. Upon careful and prayerful consideration of the offices' and the Homes' letters, WS leadership will make the decision as to whether a country remains classified a sensitive country or not.

35. PROCEDURES FOR WITHDRAWING PERMISSION TO REMAIN IN A COUNTRY

A. A non-national member's permission to remain in a country may be withdrawn only if the member is contravening or failing to fulfil the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and/or the "Fundamental Family Rules," and the member's activities or continued presence in the country are deemed to be detrimental to the work in that country. To withdraw permission, the following procedures must be followed:

1. If the continen tal or area office feel that a member's activities are detrimental to the work, they must explain the matter to, and receive the agreement of, the other office; that is, the area or continental office respectively.

a) If the other office agrees, the continental office must write the member explicitly explaining the activities that he has, or is, engaged in that are detrimental to the work. Upon receipt of the letter, the member must cease such activities.

(1) If the member does not cease t he activities, or the continental office and area officer agree that the member's continued presence in the country is detrimental to the work, the member's permission to remain in the country can be withdrawn.

(2) If the member disagrees with the decision, he can write WS leadership within seven days explaining why he disagrees. He may remain in the country while WS leadership is deciding the matter.

b) If the continental office and the area office do not agree, the office which feels the member's activities are detrimental must write the member explicitly explaining the activities which he has, or is, engaged in that are detrimental to the work. Upon receipt of the letter, the member must cease the activities.

(1) The continental office, the area office and the member must write WS leadership within seven days to explain their positions.

(2) After prayerful consideration, WS leadership will decide the matter.

2. If the member's permission is withdrawn, the continental office must inform the member that his permission to remain in the country has been withdrawn and specify the date by which he must leave the country. A copy of the letter must be sent to the area office.

a) Failure to comply by the member will result in his Family membership being in jeopardy.

36. PROCEDURES FOR PLACING A HOME ON PROBATIONARY NOTICE

A. A Home can only be placed on Probationary Notice if it violates, contravenes or fails to fulfil the Responsibilities of the Charter Home.

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B. In cases of no or low or late tithe or 1% FAF contribution, no or late Home monthly report, or no or late semi-annual Home Self-Evaluation Checklist, or being in debt for two consecutive months, a Home will automatically be placed on Probationary Notice.

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C. If a co ntinental or area officer determines that a Home should be placed on Probationary Notice, they must:

1. In the case of an area office initiating the Probationary Notice, they must notify the continental office of their intent to do so.

2. Assemble the Home's voting members and declare that they intend to put the Home on first-stage Probationary Notice, specifically stating in which way the Home is violating, contravening or failing to fulfil the Responsibilities of the Charter Home.

3. Attempt to discover, through discussion with the Home members during the assembly, if there are any extraordinary circumstances or valid reasons as to why certain Responsibilities of the Charter Home are not being fulfilled or are being contravened.

a) If the area office determines that the Home has a legitimate reason for contravening or not fulfilling the Responsibilities of the Charter Home, it can stop the procedure and inform the continental office concerning the specifics of the case. T he final decision as to whether the Home should be placed on Probationary Notice will then be made by the continental office, which must inform WS leadership.

4. Specifically explain what changes the Home must make. The Home must make those changes within 30 days.

5. Officially declare to the Home's voting members that they are on first-stage Probationary Notice, and also inform the continental office of the Home's status.

a) The continental office will immediately withhold all WS maili ngs from the Home until such time as the Probationary Notice is lifted.

(1) Homes on Probationary Notice are not permitted to receive new CM mailings from other Charter Members, in accordance with point G. of Offenses Warranting Excommunication.

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       The continental or area officers are responsible to place a Home on Probationary Notice if they find the Home is not fulfilling, or is contravening, the Responsibilities of the Charter Home (these include sections 10 - 13 of the Charter ). Beginning the procedure is a continental or area office decision, which means that it must have the agreement of the majority of the continental or area officers. So if one CRO or VS was visiting a Home and felt it should be placed on Probationary Notice, he would need to inform and get a majority agreement of the other members of his teamwork. In the case of an area office beginning the procedure to put a Home on Probationary Notice, it would also notify the continental office of their inten t to proceed with putting the Home on Probationary Notice.

       The continental office must publish in their Bulletin a listing of all Homes which are on Probationary Notice for other than technical infractions*, so that all Homes are aware of any Homes that are on Probationary Notice. (Likewise, a listing of all Homes no longer on Probationary Notice should be published in the Bulletin.) (*Technical infractions include late TRF or tithe, no HSEC report, etc.)

       A continental or area office has no authority to allow a Home to contravene or fail to fulfill provisions in the Charter. If an area office discovers what it perceives to be a legitimate reason as to why a Home is not fulfilling, or is contravening the Responsibilities of the Charter Home, the area office must notify the CRO that it is temporarily stopping the procedure, and the CRO will make the final decision on the matter.

b) Home members may not join, or open, another Charter Home during the period of Probationary Notice.

(1) Members of Homes which are on Probationary Notice temporarily relinquish their Right of Mobility, unless they were put on Probationary Notice due to their Home's population being too large.

c) If the Home does not agree that they should be placed on Probationary Notice, they may write to their continental office about the matter. The Home will remain on Probationary Notice pending the continental office's decision.

(1) After consideration of the matter, the continental office will de cide if the Home should remain on Probationary Notice.

D. Homes placed on first-stage Probationary Notice have 30 days to make the specified changes. Once the changes are made and verified, the area office must immediately notify the Home and the continental office that the Home is no longer on first-stage Probationary Notice. Upon such notification, the continental office will release all WS mailings held during the 30-day period.

1. Verification is made by one of the following methods:

a) By visitation of a continental or area officer, who will determine by observation, investigation and discussion with the Home members that the changes have been made.

b) If visitation by a continental or area officer is not warranted, practical, or possible at that time, the Home's officers must send a letter to the area and continental offices explaining the changes made. All the Home's officers and at least a simple majority of the other voting members must sign this letter.

E. If a fter the 30-day period of first-stage Probationary Notice the Home has not made the specified changes, it will be placed on second-stage Probationary Notice for a further 30 days.

1. If at any time during the second 30-day Probationary Notice the Home makes the specific changes, it can seek verification.

2. After verification, the area office must notify the Home and the continental office that the Home is no longer under Probationary Notice. The continental office will resume sending WS m ailings to the Home. Mailings missed during the entire period of Probationary Notice will only be sent to the Home once they send the continental office an NPC service charge. The service charge will be determined by the continental office.

       If a Home makes the necessary changes during the second period of Probationary Notice, they can begin receiving their current WS mailings. They can also receive mailings missed during their period of Probationary Notice by sending their CRO a $100 NPC servi ce charge. This service charge will cover the expense of the NPC having to fill their order for their missed mailings and putting the Home back on the regular Charter mailing list.

F. If after the 30-day period of second-stage Probationary Notice the Home still has not made the specific changes, it will continue to miss its CM publications, but will begin receiving FM mailings. A continental or area officer must, within 30 days, visit the Home, and through observation, investigation and discu ssion with Home members decide if there are any of the Home members who might be eligible to retain their Charter membership. The Home will be officially classified as a Fellow Member Home and its members as Fellow Members.

       At the end of the period of second-stage Probationary Notice—that is, after being on Probationary Notice for 60 days—if the Home has not made the necessary changes, it will no longer be eligible to receive CM mailings and the CRO will instead begin sending the Home FM mai lings. A VS or CRO must visit the Home within the following 30 days to see if anyone in the Home should retain their Charter Member status. Generally, all members of the Home would automatically be put on Fellow Member status at this point, but there may be circumstances that the officer feels qualify certain members to retain their Charter Member status.

       As a possible scenario, let's take a Home that has 12 voting members. Nine of its voting members are not doing well, and when the VS tells t hem what changes need to be made, they either don't agree or just decide not to make the changes for whatever reason. However, the other three voting members want to make the changes, but because the other nine members outvote them they are unable to make the necessary changes.

       Because the Home is on Probationary Notice, these three voting members can't exercise their Right of Mobility, so they are stuck in a Home that doesn't want to change and is on its way to Fellow Member status. In such a case, the area officer would visit, listen to their explanation, and after fully investigating the situation has the authority to suggest to the continental office that these three voting members retain their Charter Member status and rights once they move to a Charter Home. The Home will at this point be officially declared a Fellow Member Home and the rest of the members Fellow Members.

37. PROCEDURES FOR PLACING A MEMBER ON PROBATIONARY STATUS

A. Probationary Status is a disciplinary measure that can only be administered by the Home to a member who violates, contravenes or fails to fulfil the Responsibilities of Individual Members or the "Fundamental Family Rules."

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B. A member is placed on Probationary Status for a period to be determined by a simple majority of the Home's voting members, not to exceed three months.

C. While on Probationary Status, the m ember:

1. Is no longer a voting member of the Home.

2. Loses his or her Right of Mobility.

a) If a minor is placed on Probationary Status, his or her parent(s) still retain(s) the right to move their child to another location during this period.

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3. Must read parts, or all, of the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or those on Partial Excommunication (Appendix G.), at the Home officers' discretion, as well as other publications that the Home's officers deem nece ssary. The member does not lose access to any CM publications.

D. Members can be recommended for Probationary Status by the Home's officers, providing the following procedures are adhered to:

1. The Home officers must clearly explain to the Home's voting members, with the member in question present if he so chooses, showing just cause why the member is being recommended for Probationary Status, and proposing for how long.

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2. After the matter has been discussed, the member in question should be informed that the Home is considering placing him on Probationary Status. The member should be given the opportunity to come before the Home to present his case or refute the accusations against them, if he or she so desires.

3. The matter is to be discussed and voted on, by secret ballot.

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4. If a simple majority agree with the recommendation, the Home officers must officially inform the member that he has been placed on Probationary Status, explaining the rea sons why and what is required of him or her.

E. A member that has been placed on Probationary Status may exercise his Right of Redress if he is not in agreement with the Home's decision.

       Probationary Status is a disciplinary measure for a Home member that is decided upon by the Home. When someone is placed on Probationary Status, they automatically lose their right to vote and their Right of Mobility. This should be for a predetermined length of time, not exceeding three months, and should be a penalty proportional to the offense. In most cases, a less severe correction should have preceded a member being put on Probationary Status, such as missing some activities, etc. It is also a good idea to assign an appropriate reading list to help strengthen the Home member.

       Probationary Status is a disciplinary measure invoked by the Home and is similar to what was once known as "Babes Status," although they do not lose access to CM lit. The member on Probationary Status should concentra te on reading the new GNs, and the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or those on Partial Excommunication (Appendix G).

38. PROCEDURES FOR MOVING A CHARTER MEMBER TO FELLOW MEMBER STATUS

A. A member's Charter Member status can only be revoked by the continental office if a member violates, contravenes or fails to fulfil the Responsibilities of Individual Members or the "Fundamental Family Rules," and two of the three bodies involved (the Home, the area office, the continental office) agree.

B. Members can be recommended for Fellow Member status by a two-thirds majority of their Home, or by an area or con tinental office, providing the following procedures are adhered to:

1. For the Home to recommend:

a) The Home officers must first have endeavored through prayer and counsel to help the member to live up to the Responsibilities of Individual Members and the "Fundamental Family Rules." They must inform the member of the way in which he has failed to live up to his responsibilities and what is required of him, and allow reasonable time for compliance. If, after reasonable time, the member fai ls to comply, the Home officers must inform him that they are recommending to the Home that he be moved to Fellow Member status.

b) The Home officers must clearly explain and show just cause to its voting members why the member is being recommended for Fellow Member status. The matter is to be discussed, with the member in question present if he so chooses, and then voted on by secret ballot.

c) If a two-thirds majority agree with the recommendation, a letter stating the reasons for the re commendation and the outcome of the vote must be sent to the area and continental offices, and a copy given to the member.

d) The office(s) must respond within fourteen days. During this time the member has the right to send a letter of rebuttal to the area and/or continental offices.

2. For an area or continental office to recommend:

a) A two-thirds majority of the officers from the office making the recommendation must agree.

b) The recommending office must write a letter to the me mber explicitly explaining and showing just cause for the recommendation. A copy of the letter must be sent to the member's Home and all other offices involved. The member has the right to send a letter of rebuttal to the area and/or continental offices.

(1) Upon receipt of a letter recommending one of its members for Fellow Member status, the Home must, within seven days, convene a Home council meeting to discuss the recommendation and vote on the matter by secret ballot. The results of the vote must immediately be sent to the area and continental office and a copy given to the member.

(i) In that Home council meeting, the member is free to present the reasons why he feels he should retain his Charter membership.

(2) If the vote of the Home is to not recommend moving the member to Fellow Member status, the Home's officers must write to the area and continental offices explaining why they feel the member should not be moved to Fellow Member status. The area and continental off ices must take the Home's vote into consideration when deciding the matter.

C. For a Charter Member to be moved to Fellow Member status, two of the three bodies (the Home, the area office involved, or the continental office) must agree to revoke the member's Charter Member status.

1. If two of the three bodies agree, the member must receive written notification of his change of status from his continental office.

       Moving someone to Fellow Member status can be a difficult situation for eve ryone involved. Requiring two of the three bodies to agree to the move will hopefully ensure that no one is moved to Fellow Member status unfairly.

       Once the decision has been made to move a member to Fellow Member status, the Home should continue to treat the person lovingly and kindly. They are still part of the overall Family and are just moving to a level of discipleship for which they are better suited. An effort should be made to make his or her move as practical and easy as possible.

       T his also holds true for those who are leaving the Family completely. They are still our Christian brothers and sisters and fellow laborers in His Kingdom, and we should show them genuine love and concern. Dad said, "Are you sitting around in your smug, self-satisfied, self-righteous, holier-than-thou complacency condemning them for straying away and getting lost, cursing them for getting caught in the brambles or by the wolves, and indifferently writing them off as a lost cause because you alway s knew they were only sour grapes anyhow? Are you like the Good Shepherd, who lovingly seeks to save the lost sheep, or the hireling that's glad to get rid of him as good riddance to bad rubbish, and one less to have to take care of? Which are you, shepherd or hireling? And if they do come back, do you treat them royally, like the Father did the Prodigal Son, or do you resent them, like the Older Brother? Which are you?" (ML #155:67.)

       If it is a family, a single parent with children, or a teen leaving, it would be helpful if an effort could be made to help them find a place to stay, or find them an initial landing place of some sort, perhaps with other Fellow Members. This will not be possible in every case, and often the member may not need or want the help, but the point is to be loving and kind to these brethren.

       If a case arises in which a Home's members feel that their Home teamwork should be put on Fellow Member status, but find it difficult to bring this up in a Home council meeting, they may write to their area office, which could assist them.

D. Once a member has been notified that he is being recommended for Fellow Member status, the member:

1. Loses his Right of Mobility until the matter is decided.

2. Must be freed from his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities, if indeed he is moved to Fellow Member status.

a) If the member is personally responsible for creating, in whole or in part, debts and/or liabilities due to personally spending or aut horizing the spending of funds which were not agreed upon by two-thirds of the Home's voting members, he will retain responsibility for those debts. The amount is to be decided by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members.

       When a member loses his Charter Member status and becomes a Fellow Member, he normally must be freed from his portion of all debts and liabilities of the Home. Although we are freeing those moving to Fellow Member status of debts and liabilities to help make their t ransition as easy as possible, we would hope that once a Fellow Member is set up and established, they would want to voluntarily help financially toward their old Home's debts and liabilities.

       In the case where the member in question has caused all or part of the debts or liabilities of the Home, through disobedience to the "Fundamental Family Rules," or spending funds without having authorization from the Home, he will still be responsible for all or part of the debt. For example, if the memb er who is about to become a Fellow Member spent $1,000 on unauthorized international telephone calls, he would not necessarily be freed from that financial obligation.

       The amount of obligation that the member in question would have for the debt or liability in such a case would depend on his personal responsibility for the debt. If two members of the Home made a major purchase which put the Home in debt, without prior authorization, the two members would continue to share responsibility for th e debt after becoming Fellow Members.

3. Is free to begin fundraising activities to facilitate his potential move if it is decided that he is to be moved to Fellow Member status.

a) A minimum of 50% of the net income generated must be used to facilitate the member's move to a Fellow Member Home or the setting up of their own Fellow Member Home. The amount of funds and time needed to raise these funds can be determined by a two-thirds majority of the Home.

       Once a member has been notified that he is being recommended for Fellow Member status, he may begin fundraising to help facilitate his potential move. Remember, it is only a recommendation at this stage that the member be moved to Fellow Member status; he is not yet a Fellow Member.

E. If the member is not moved to Fellow Member status, the member:

1. Regains his Right of Mobility.

2. Must turn in to the Home any funds generated through his fundraising activities, unless he decides to depart from the Home.

a) If th e member wishes to depart from the Home, all funds generated through his fundraising activities are first to be used to pay his portion of the Home's debts and liabilities, with any remaining balance to be used to facilitate his move.

F. When a member is moved to Fellow Member status, the Home is responsible to ensure that the departing Fellow Member:

1. Prepares to leave the Home in an orderly fashion by turning over pertinent ministry materials, contacts or other legal material, bank acc ounts, post office boxes and funds belonging to the Charter Home or the Family, and thoroughly explains his ministries, duties and responsibilities to the appropriate person(s).

2. Only has in his possession publications that Fellow Members are authorized to have, in accordance with the Classifications of Family Membership and Literature, B. 1.)

3. Has had his computer and other personal papers checked and purged.

4. Has a reporting address and related instructions for reporting to the continental office.

39. PROCEDURES FOR RELINQUISHING CHARTER MEMBER STATUS

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       When a member relinquishes their Charter Member status, the following procedures should be followed. These procedures apply to a Charter Member leaving the Family or moving to Fellow Member status, as well as to an entire Home leaving the Family or moving to Fellow Member status.

A. The departing member and the Home should endeavor to part on as friendly terms as possible.

B. The Home should make a reasonable effort to help the departing member get situated outside the Home.

C. The departing member should leave in an orderly fashion by responsibly turning over their contacts and pertinent ministry material, and explaining their ministries, duties and responsibilities to the appropriate Home member(s).

1. In the case of a member moving to Fellow Member status, the dividing of contacts should be made in accordance with Right of Mobility, A. 3.

D. If the departing member is holding any portion of the Ho me's HER funds, these must be turned in to the Home.

1. In the case of an entire Home relinquishing Charter membership, any outstanding Home loans should be repaid at the time of departing, or if that is not possible, within the time originally agreed upon with the continental office. The entire HER fund should be returned to the continental office.

E. Any member moving to Fellow Member status or leaving the Family should turn in any CM publications to their Home, other than those in the C lassifications of Family Membership and Literature, B. 1., which Fellow Members are eligible to keep.

1. In the case of an entire Home moving to Fellow Member status or leaving the Family, they should turn in all publications other than those Fellow Members are eligible for, listed in the Classifications of Family Membership and Literature B. 1. to their area or continental office.

F. If the Home has debts, an agreement should be reached between the departing member and the Home as to the payment of the departing member's portion of the Home's debts and liabilities. The Home can either forgive the departing member's portion of the debt, or can agree with the departing member on a timetable for them to pay their portion of the debt to the Home.

40. PROCEDURE FOR NON-FAMILY PERSONS BECOMING FELLOW MEMBERS AND STARTING THEIR OWN HOME

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A. If a non-Family person (or former Family member) wishes to become a Fellow Member they must apply to the continental office stating their desire to do so. In their letter, they should explain their circumstances and why they wish to become a Family member. At this time they should also request a copy of the Statement on Fellow Members.

B. If, after reading this Statement and prayerful c onsideration they determine that they would like to attempt to meet the Fellow Member standard, they should notify the continental office that they have read the Statement on Fellow Members and agree to abide by it.

C. Once the application to become a Fellow Member has been approved by the continental office, the continental office will notify the new member and supply the applicant with the necessary monthly report forms and reporting instructions.

1. The new Fellow Member may begin repor ting immediately. They will begin receiving CM/FM and FM mailings as soon as their first tithe and report are received.

2. If the applicant is deemed ineligible for Fellow Member status, the continental office will inform them of the reasons why their application has been denied within 45 days.

D. During the first six months of being a Fellow Member, the new member should read through the Babes Basic Course, Appendix F. The Letters in this course can be requested from the continental offic e.

1. If the new member was a Charter Member, Fellow Member, catacomber or live-out member in the year prior to applying for Fellow membership, they are not required to read the Babes Basic Course. Instead, they should read the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or those on Partial Excommunication (Appendix G.).

41. PROCEDURES FOR EXCOMMUNICATING FAMILY MEMBERS

A. Charter Members can only be excommunicated by the continental office, and only if the member commits one of the Offenses Warranting Excommunication.

1. Charter Members can be fully excommunicated from receiving Family literature and from Family fellowship.

2. Alternatively, if the continental office determines it to be appropriate and proportionate discipline for the offense, Charter Members can be partially excommunicated. Partial Excommunication must be for a period of not less than three or more than six months.

While partially excommunicated, the member:

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a) If partially excommunicated for a sex related Charter offense, must refrain from sexual contact, except with their mate if they have one.

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(1) If the member was partially excommunicated for sexual activity with a non-Charter member, they must refrain from any sexual activity with another person until they are cleared of having contract ed the HIV virus by taking an AIDS test immediately, followed by a second AIDS test no sooner than six months after the first. They must also take a test for sexually transmitted diseases and refrain from any sexual activity until they have tested free from any sexually transmitted diseases, other than herpes.

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(2) If the member was partially excommunicated for only deep kissing a non-Charter member and no other sexual activity, they must refrain from any sexual activity with anothe r person, until they are cleared of having contracted the HIV virus by taking an AIDS test immediately, followed by a second AIDS test no sooner than three months after the first.

(i) Members partially excommunicated for the above offenses, who are mated, may have sexual relations with their mate, if their mate agrees, providing they use a condom each time. The partially excommunicated member's mate must also agree not to share sexually with others until their mate has been cleared after his or her second AIDS test.

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(3) If a Charter Member has sexual activity with anyone who has had sexual activity with an outsider, they must immediately refrain from any sexual activity (except with their mate if their mate is in agreement, who also must then refrain from any sexual activity with others), until the person they had sexual activity with (the partially excommunicated member) is cleared by their second AIDS test after six months, or they themselves take a second AIDS test after six months.

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b) Must read from the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or those on Partial Excommunication, during their period of excommunication.

c) Is not a voting member of the Home.

d) Loses his Right of Mobility.

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(1) A partially excommunicated member loses his or her Right of Mobility. However, the teamwork of his or her Home can give its approval for the member to move to another Home. And if the receiving Home is aware that the member is partially excommunicated and votes the prospective member into the Home according to Charter guidelines, the continental office of the area in which the member on partial excommunication resides may give approval for the member to move to the receiving Home. The receiving Home, if in a different continental area, must also receive approval from their continental office to receive the member.

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(2) If the partially excommunicated member's Home disbands while he or she is still partial ly excommunicated, he or she has the right to move to another Home. The new Home must be informed that this member is partially excommunicated.

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(3) If a minor is placed on Partial Excommunication, their parent(s) still retain(s) the right to move their child to another location during this period.

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e) Must forego all alcoholic beverages.

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f) Must forego all movies, both in the Home and at movie theaters, and watching television, except for news or educatio nal documentaries and videos that are part of their schooling curriculum.

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g) Must forego surfing the Internet, as well as the playing of computer games.

       Members may access the Internet for business or school purposes only and with the approval and oversight of the Home's officers.

h) Might be required to live outside of the Home for a period of time specified by the continental office.

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(1) If living outside a Charter Home during the period of partial excommunicat ion, the member must test negative for the HIV virus before moving into a Charter Home, and again test negative after having lived within the Charter Home for a six-month period. They must have no sexual activity during this first six-month period of again living in a Charter Home. They must also take a test for sexually transmitted diseases and refrain from any sexual activity until they have tested free from any sexually transmitted diseases, other than herpes.

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(i) If mated, the partially excommunicated member may have sexual relations with their mate upon returning to the Charter Home, if their mate is agreeable to it. However this may only be done provided this couple use a condom each time, and the excommunicated member's mate agrees not to share sexually with others until their mate has been cleared after his or her second AIDS test, six months after their initial test. They must also take a test for sexually transmitted diseases and refrain from any sexual activity until they have tested free from any sexually transmitted diseases, other than herpes.

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(2) If debts are incurred while living outside a Charter Home during the period of partial excommunication, they must be paid off before the member moves back into a Charter Home.

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       As you will note, there is a difference between full and partial excommunication. With full excommunication, besides being cut off from all but GP/DFO Family literature, the excommunicated member may als o be cut off from all Family fellowship for an indefinite period of time (This is a small but significant change that allows for those who have been fully excommunicated to have contact with Family members, unless expressly forbidden by the CRO, which would be announced to the Homes.) Unless otherwise specified by the CRO, it is up to the Home itself to determine whether or not they will have contact with a fully excommunicated member, and to what degree. A Home cannot, however, allow an excommu nicated member to join their Home as a member without approval from the CRO (see Procedures for Accepting New Disciples into a Charter Home, A. 1.).

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       With partial excommunication, it is up to the discretion of the continental office to determine whether the member can serve their sentence in the Home or not. The continental office may decide to separate the partially excommunicated member from the Charter Home for a given period of time, or to allow him to remain in the Home during his entire period of partial excommunication. As well, the continental office determines the duration of partial excommunication, but it must be at least three months and not more than six months.

3. In the case of a Charter Member having had sexual activity with a non-Charter member, the continental office has the option of allowing the Charter Member to become a Fellow Member rather than being excommunicated. If the member agrees, the Procedures for Moving a Charter Member to Fellow Member Status will be waived and the change of status will take effect immediately upon receipt of notice from the continental office.

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       Because Fellow Members are allowed to have sexual relations with non-Family members, in some cases, if a Charter Member feels that they would rather become a Fellow Member in order to be able to pursue a relationship with a non-Family member, the continental office may give them the option of doing so rather than being partially excommunicated and continui ng on as a Charter Member.

B. Only the Home's officers or the area or continental office can initiate recommendations for full or partial excommunication. To recommend excommunication, the following procedures must be adhered to:

1. The Home officers must inform the area and continental offices of the member's excommunicable offense, giving full details of the matter.

2. Regardless of who initiates the excommunication, the area office must fully investigate the matter, speaking personal ly with the Home officers, the member in question, and anyone else involved.

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a) A Home member who has acknowledged that he committed an excommunicable offense has the option, if he or she so desires, of waiving the right to have an area officer visit and investigate the offense, thereby fully accepting the sentence of the continental office.

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(1) The continental office reserves the right to not accept the Home member's waiver of a personal visit by an area officer.

3. The area office must inform the continental office of its findings, and its assessment of whether the member has committed the excommunicable offense, and if so, recommend to the continental office full or partial excommunication.

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C. Upon receipt of the area office report and recommendation, the continental officers, by a two-thirds majority, will decide whether full or partial excommunication is warranted, and the length and other conditions thereof.

1. If full excommunication is warranted, the continental office will inform the member and his Home, in writing, that the member's Family membership is withdrawn.

2. If partial excommunication is warranted, the continental office will notify the member and his Home that the member has been partially excommunicated, specifying all conditions, including the duration of his or her partial excommunication.

FUNDAMENTAL FAMILY RULES

PREFACE TO THE FUNDAMENTAL FAMILY RULES

       Throughout the years Dad and Mama have given us a great deal of excellent counsel, some of which was meant to be taken as actual rules that the Family was expected to follow. However, much of their counsel was given for particular and specific situations, so when published for the worldwide Family, such counsel was intended more as guidelines, which were to be applied as individual situations warranted it.

       Because it wasn't always specified in the Letters which were intended to be hard and fast rules and which were guidelines, there has been a diversity in what was applied or not applied in the Homes; though for the most part, the Homes have attempted to implement most of this counsel as rules. We found over 600 such rules/guidelines throughout our pubs.

       In addition to these 600 "rules," the Homes or local areas would originate local or area-wide rules, which members were expected to obey. These local rules were usually implemented for a good reason. However, often later when these rules became unnecessary in another given situation, they were still being enforced simply because they remained "on the books," so to speak.

       So in order to clarify and standardize our rules throughout the Family, we have compiled the "Fundamental Family Rules." We have reviewed the rules and guidelines in the Letters, and have chosen only those that we feel should be rules for everyone. Any "rules" that are not included in the "Fundamental Famil y Rules" are not to be viewed as overall Family rules.

       This does not mean that the counsel from the Letters that we have not included should be ignored, or that it no longer applies. The counsel in the Letters still very much applies, and should be implemented as needed in your personal and local situations. The point is, however, that you are not going to be penalized or disciplined if you don't. Counsel or "rules" not included in the "Fundamental Family Rules" are left up to you as individua ls and Homes to pray, counsel and decide upon as far as their implementation.

       To cite an example: For some time there has been a standing indoor/outdoor shoe rule. We have not included this in the "Fundamental Family Rules." Therefore, if your Home decides not to implement indoor/outdoor shoes, the VS cannot say that you are "breaking the rules," because you are not.

       This doesn't mean that every Home should now stop using indoor/outdoor shoes. Although in some situations this policy may not be necessary, it remains a good idea, especially if you have young children who play on the floor, or live in a culture that would be offended if you did not, but that decision is up to the Home's voting members to make. If your Home decides to discontinue using indoor/outdoor shoes, and your young children who crawl on the floor become sick, then it is your Home which must determine whether or not the dirty floors may have been the cause, and whether or not you want to re-evaluate your decision to dispense with indoor/outdoor shoes.

       The "Fundamental Family Rules" list all of our Family rules. These rules now replace all previous rules, such as, and including, the "DTR Rules" and so forth.

       The "Fundamental Family Rules" are sub-divided into 20 categories, and these categories fall either under behavioral-type rules or procedural-type rules. Behavioral rules, which are listed first, are those rules that cover our actions, while procedural rules cover matters such as elections, Home size, etc.

       We have rules for reasons! God has rules for reasons. What are they for? Just to make it hard for you? Just because God's mean to you and He doesn't want you to have any fun? What are the rules for? Are they because God hates you and He doesn't want you to enjoy yourself? He's a loving parent who knows the danger, and therefore He makes the rules because He loves you and wants to protect you and keep you, and He wants you to keep the rules to help keep yourself! (ML #1591:16.)

42. THE GOVERNING PRINCIPLES OF THE RULES

       Before you embark on your reading of the "Fundamental Family Rules," it is important to understand and grasp the principles behind them. The following four points will hopefully help you to do that.

A. Rules in the section Offenses Warranting Excommunication, are to be obeyed at all times by everyone, no exceptions. Those who disobey them will be excommunicated from Family fellowship and/or literature, according to the degree of disobedience, w hich will be determined by the continental office.

       Offenses Warranting Excommunication are only those offenses which are deemed extremely serious. Exceptions to anyone breaking these rules will not be permitted. In other words, if you break one of the rules listed under this category you will be excommunicated.

       The excommunication rules apply equally to the new babe and to the seasoned leader. They govern us all, and if we break them we will be excommunicated. The length and severity of the excommunication may vary according to the circumstances, as would a sentence given in a court of law. The Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members cover how excommunication will be handled and whether it will be full or partial.

       A member can only be excommunicated for breaking the rules listed in the category Offenses Warranting Excommunication.

       [Those who commit] really serious crimes and offenses that could jeopardize our work should definitely be excommunicated! (ML #2340:35.)

B . Family Rules are to be obeyed by all Charter Members, with exceptions only in a rare situation when warranted, or in an unavoidable circumstance. Those who persistently disregard them will be disciplined in an appropriate and proportionate manner according to the severity and frequency of the offense, up to and including the loss of their Charter membership.

       As mentioned earlier, there are both behavioral and procedural rules. The procedural ones are quite structured, with some of them, like the Home Size Rules, carrying automatic penalties if disobeyed. For example, if your Home population is reported as oversized on two consecutive TRFs, your Home will automatically be put on Probationary Notice. Another procedural rule is that if your Home does not pay its bills and as a result has outstanding debts for two months in a row, your Home will likewise automatically be put on Probationary Notice.

       Some of the behavioral rules are by their nature a bit more subjective, although we ha ve tried to make them as precise as possible. Breaking these rules can result in some form of discipline, ranging from an admonishment, to your Home putting you on Probationary Status or to the CROs moving you to Fellow Member status, depending on the severity and frequency of the offense. The discipline must be appropriate and proportionate in each particular case.

       Some examples of discipline that a Home teamwork might employ in the majority of situations include: The assigning of extra dutie s like dishwashing, the loss of Home responsibilities, the temporary forfeiting of an activity or privilege, such as missing a movie or an outing. Often a verbal admonishment will suffice for the first offense. Home teamworks could also assign reading lists and the writing of reactions to what was read to the offending Home member to help strengthen them in their weak area.

       The behavioral rules are important because they help set the Family standard for acceptable behavior. These particular ru les have been chosen because they are deemed important, helpful and advantageous for all Charter Members to follow. They reflect our religious beliefs, and their purpose is to help all of us put those beliefs into practice in our daily lives. By all of us keeping these rules, we can more easily live together in harmony, as we will all be adhering to the same behavioral standard.

       These behavioral rules are to be obeyed by everyone, from top leader down to brand new babe. However, unlike the Off enses Warranting Excommunication, there are times when exceptions can be made to the behavioral-type rules, in a rare situation where an exception is warranted, or in an unavoidable circumstance.

       As hard as you might try to keep the rules, it's inevitable that at some time or another you will break one of these behavioral rules. When you do, you do not need to be fearful that you will lose your place in the Charter Family! Depending on the situation, you might be admonished by your teamwork, o r it may just be mentioned to you if your disobedience is a rare occurrence or special circumstance. However, if you persistently disregard and break these rules, some appropriate discipline will be meted out.

       Family rules are to be obeyed by all—regardless of who you are (ML #2710:23).

       You have got to decide on what rules must be obeyed without fail, and without exception, and what rules can sometimes be relaxed and exceptions made. But you have to have the wisdom of God to know the diff erence, which is which: Which ones you must enforce without fail, and on which you can be merciful. Even God does that. God has lots of rules. He made lots of rules in His first standard of the Mosaic Law, which was His original standard. But under the Law of Love He has even more rigidly enforced some rules, and under Love He has relaxed some others so they're not as tough. We just have to have the wisdom of the Lord to know the difference (ML #1705:16,17).

C. Family Rules are only those thi ngs specifically mandated or forbidden in the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or "Fundamental Family Rules."

       If it's not in the Charter or the "Fundamental Family Rules" it's not a Family rule! This is a very important point. Everyone needs to understand that other than the specific rules listed in the Charter or the "Fundamental Family Rules," there are no other rules in place for the worldwide Family.

       The Family is expected to fulfil the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" an d obey the "Fundamental Family Rules," as well as Home regulations that the Home itself establishes by a majority vote. If someone violates, contravenes or fails to fulfil these, they can be disciplined, but only for those reasons.

D. The individual and/or the Home should decide upon all matters that are not addressed in the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and "Fundamental Family Rules" after prayer, counsel, and the reading of the Bible, the MLs and other Family publications.

       As s tated above, any matter not addressed in the Charter or in the "Fundamental Family Rules" isn't a rule. It is up to each individual and/or Home to decide how or if other matters should be made rules for their lives or Homes. Of course, you will want to pray about all such matters, counsel about them, look in the Letters and other Family pubs to see the counsel given, but then it's up to you and/or your Home to make a decision on how or whether or not to apply the counsel.

       As you know, there is a wealth of counsel and guidance throughout the Letters and the other pubs, which should be adhered to, and if you read and apply this counsel the Lord will undoubtedly bless you. It is, however, up to you to make the decision whether to follow that counsel or not. It is your responsibility to make that decision and to live with the outcome of your choices. You have the right to choose in these matters, and you have the responsibility for your choices.

       This is what we're trying to do throug h the MO Letters, like Paul's Epistles. We're trying to advise you from what we've learned from the Lord, our own experience, but you don't necessarily have to do what we say! You can make your own decisions, according to your own leading from the Lord! (ML #127:28.)

43. OFFENSES WARRANTING EXCOMMUNICATION

Charter Members will be excommunicated for:

A. Engaging in sexual activity with non-Family, or non-Charter members.

1. WS leadership may, in exceptional cases, permit Charter Members to engage in sexual activity with live-out members and long-standing Family friends. In such rare instances, permission will be explicitly given to the member concerned and to their continental office.

       Charter Members are not permitted to engage in physical sexual activity with outsiders, or even Fellow Members, for various reasons. One reason in particular is because we do not want Family members to get AIDS. "Sexual activity" is not limited to only sexual intercourse, it includes any and all physical sexual activity, including deep kissing.

       There are some live-out members and Family friends who became members or befriended the Family before 1987 during the FF era. In a few rare instances these relationships became de facto marriages, and thus sexual c ontact was allowed to continue. WS leadership has approved these cases, and the continental offices involved are aware of each case.

       All sex with outsiders is now banned! (Unless they're long-term close and well-known friends!) (ML #2531:13.)

B. Engaging in any male-with-male sexual activities.

       It is our Bible-based belief that male homosexuality is ungodly. Family members will be excommunicated for engaging in such activities. This clause is purposely worded in this manner to make it v ery clear that it is strictly forbidden for men to have any kind of sexual activity whatsoever with other men.

       Sodomy is male homosexuality, or "men with men doing that which is unseemly," and which God strictly forbids and severely judged as the most evil and abominable sexual sin of all (ML #258:16).

       Sodomy is [a] very serious excommunicable offense (ML #2717:25.)

C. Engaging in sexual activity with new or rejoining members who have been in the Family for less than six months.

       This is the "no sex with babes rule," which has been a Family rule for a long time. The reason for this rule is two-fold: First, because beginning sexual relationships with either a new or rejoining member diverts their attention from the most needed aspects of babes training, which include getting into the Word, building a relationship with the Lord, and learning to live within the Family. Sexual or romantic relationships during those first six months are viewed as an unneeded distraction.

       The sec ond reason is because new members need to get an AIDS test when they first join and then be re-tested after six months. We want to ensure that they are not HIV-positive and/or do not have AIDS. Medical evidence indicates that it is best to check someone twice, at the beginning and end of a six-month period, providing sufficient reassurance that they are not carrying the HIV virus.

       Sex with babes (new disciples in the Family less than six months) is an excommunicable offense. "No-sex-with-bab es" means just that—No sex! Not even mutual masturbation, oral sex or whatever, and not with condoms either! (ML #2531:12.)

       We're an army, and when babes join they need to go through their initial training and boot camp without the complications of personal relationships. They need time to fall in love with Jesus and the Word first, then later when they are stronger they can be trusted with the added blessing of sexual fellowship (ML #1909:20.)

D. Those over the age of 21 engaging in sexua l contact with those under the age of 21. The only exceptions being:

       This means that no one age 21 or older is permitted to engage in sexual contact with anyone under 21, except for the particular age groups mentioned and under the circumstances listed below. Anyone over 16 who engages in sexual contact with anyone outside of their age range will be excommunicated under this rule for these offenses. (See Definition of Terms for the meaning of "sexual contact.")

1. Those who are 18, 19 and 2 0 years old are allowed to engage in sexual activity with Charter Members up to seven years older than themselves, as well as those within this age bracket. Thus, an 18-year-old may, if they wish, have sex with those from the ages of 18 through 25 inclusive, a 19-year-old may have sex with those who are 18 through 26 inclusive, and a 20-year-old may have sex with those who are 18 through 27 inclusive.

2. Those who are 21 through 25 may have sex with anyone who is 18 or older, as long as it is with mutual consent.

3. Those who are 26 may have sex with anyone 19 or older, as long as it is with mutual consent.

4. Those who are 27 may have sex with anyone 20 or older, as long as it is with mutual consent.

5. Those above the age range of points 1-4, who are engaged to marry someone between the age of 18 and 20, after three months of engagement, in accordance with the Marriage Rules, D.

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6. If two members were within the appropriate age range and regularly sharing to gether sexually, and one moves out of the age range of the other, they may request permission from the continental office to continue sharing together. The continental office may grant permission if they feel it is warranted. (See Sex and Affection Rules, H.)

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       This only applies to two members who were in the same age group and sharing together, but then one has a birthday that takes them out of the age range of their partner. For example, if a 17-year-old and a 20-year-old have bee n having dates, and then the 20-year-old turns 21 but the 17-year-old has not yet turned 18. They could request permission from their CROs to continue sharing together until the younger partner turns 18. The CROs, in counsel with resident parent(s) or guardian(s) of a 17-year-old, have the authority to grant or deny such permission.

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7. No sexual activity, which includes deep kissing, is permitted by those ages 28 or older with those under the age of 21.

       If we hear of anybody wh o violates these rules, we're going to immediately excommunicate them! Any such [sexual] involvement with minors is definitely against our rules! (ML #2536:12.)

E. Refusing to accept and fully discharge their minimum responsibility as outlined in "Living the Lord's Law of Love Series"—parts 6 and 7, ML #3206, GN 809; and ML #3207, GN 809, when a single or married man has impregnated a single woman. Unless the single woman has released the man, or the man is automatically released, as per the conditions set in sections L. and M. of Sex and Affection Rules.

       Single men or couples will be excommunicated fully or partially for refusing to accept or fully discharge their minimum responsibility at any stage during the period of their parenting teamwork responsibilities with a pregnant woman or single mother that has had a child with the man.

F. Engaging in substance abuse and/or the use of illegal or illicit drugs.

       We chose the terminology "substance abuse" to cover the full range of possibilities, both legal and illegal. Some intoxicants are not illegal, but the use of them is considered abuse. For example, sniffing glue or taking certain over-the-counter drugs for non-medical reasons can result in getting "high." Even though not illegal, those activities would be considered substance abuse.

       We added "the use of illegal or illicit drugs." The definition of "illicit" is "not sanctioned by custom or law." Family members should not be taking illegal drugs or drugs that, t hough perhaps legal, are not sanctioned by custom. For example, there may be some drug that is legal only because it's new and hasn't yet been made illegal, but its use is not acceptable within our custom or society, so we consider it illicit and therefore not allowed.

       Drug and dope abuse is against the law! Smoking and drugs in the Family are against our laws and our rules and always have been. ... Therefore, anyone who breaks these rules in any Home can't be allowed to stay in the Family o r in the Home because he becomes an actual threat and danger to the Home (ML #856:92,93).

G. Giving Family literature classified as CM to those who you know are non-Charter members, or Charter Members whose Home is on Probationary Notice; and the receiving of CM literature when your Home is on Probationary Notice.

1. In exceptional cases, World Services and continental offices may give members permission to give literature to those who would not normally be eligible to receive it.

       The Cl assifications of Family membership and Literature clearly state who is permitted to read certain classifications of Family literature. It is not permitted for Charter Members to knowingly give our CM literature to those who are not authorized to have it. This includes Charter Members whose Home has been put on Probationary Notice, and are therefore not eligible to receive new WS mailings of Charter material.

       In exceptional cases, World Services, including the CROs, may give permission to give literature to some people who would not normally be allowed to receive it, such as some academics and lawyers, etc. At times we have given them literature for their research, and while technically this is giving CM lit to non-Charter members, it has been deemed expedient, necessary and beneficial. However, only the CROs and WS are authorized to make such a decision.

       For your information, we've also begun a new "CM/FM" rating for certain publications which go to both the Charter and Fellow Member Family (but not to outside friends), as well as a "Fellow Member" rating, since we have begun sending our Fellow Members more GNs and other pubs

       And we warn you bootleggers ... that if we catch you or we hear that you are duplicating or photocopying the Word and passing them on to Homes which are not giving nor reporting as Family members should ... we are going to excommunicate you! (ML #889:2.)

H. Committing violent, intentionally endangering, or life-threatening acts, except in defe nse of self, others, or Family property.

       Family members should not be violent or commit any life-endangering acts for any reason, except in the rare case of trying to defend themselves or others, or Family property. For example, you are allowed to commit a violent act if someone is about to bash you—or any innocent helpless person, for that matter—over the head with a bat, or is trying to grab your children or set fire to your property, etc.

       This "committing violent acts" clause also cover s violence with one's mate or children. If a Family member were to become violent with their mate or children, they would face excommunication. If, however, a mate was defending himself or herself from spousal violence, then it could be judged a matter of self-defense and not necessarily grounds for excommunication. (See also "Our Stance Against Physical Violence" Statement.)

       Anybody who beats his children or beats up his wife, I said throw'm out at once! Get rid of'm! (ML #1880:56.)

       When an unwelcome visitor, such as a wolf in sheep's clothing, invades your property and starts breaking down doors, windows, socking disciples, and ripping off your sheep, don't hesitate to defend yourselves until the police come! You may have to use a little force to prevent even greater violence. Try not to hurt anyone, but definitely, forcibly, restrain them from further trespassing and violence with whatever force it takes to do so (ML #143A:61,79).

I. The continual voicing of doubts, criticisms or skepticism, in a destructive manner designed to foster strife and schism, of Dad, Maria, Peter, the Word or the Family. Criticism or inquiries of a legitimate nature for the purpose of seeking clarification or counsel, or voicing an objection, may be made, either in person or in writing, to the appropriate over-shepherds, Home officer or higher officers. Such criticisms are acceptable only if made for the purpose of seeking clarification or counsel, or voicing an objection.

       It is understandable that from time to time we have questions or even doubts that we may need to have resolved by discussing them with someone. When such an occasion arises, you should feel free to openly and honestly share your heart with your shepherds so you can get the needed answers and prayer. Such matters are legitimate and need to be expressed, so it's perfectly acceptable to talk about your doubts or your criticisms with an appropriate shepherd when trying to get clarification or counsel, or express an objection to something that you're having a difficult time understanding or following. If you're doing it with the right attitude, and with the right people, whose job it is to try to answer and help you resolve your questions, as well as shepherd you through these things and help you overcome any misconceptions, then there's nothing wrong with it.

       However, if you are speaking to members who are not the appropriate shepherds, and if after having been warned against it, you continue airing matters which result in the spreading of doubts or bringing about contention or division, then this is unacceptable behavior and will warrant excommunication.

       As you may recall, there is counsel on questions and doubts in the beginning paragraphs of the Letter "Prophecies on Doubts!" (See ML #3041:1-23, GN 670.) That Letter explains that questions are legitimate if you are undecided or uncertain about an issue, and you truly want to know the answer. If handled in the right manner, and the motive of your heart is to sincerely find the answer through the right channels, there is nothing wrong with expressing your questions. Handling such questions "in the right manner" means talking to the right people—those who are strong in faith and who would likely have the answers or be able to find them. It's not right to talk about your questions or doubts with people who are weak in faith or the Word, who might be stumbled.

       As explained in the above-mentioned Letter, there is a difference between legitimate questions that are asked out of sincere, pure motives, and skeptical, distrustful questions that are generated by the Enemy for the purpose of trying to weaken the questioner and stir up division. The Lord gave us good counsel about how to know the difference in the prophecy entitled, "The Difference Between Questions and Doubts—Try the Spirits!" (See ML #3041:18-23.) That prophecy explains that a person who has legitimate questions will be open and will seek to understand. They'll want to receive and believe the answers; they want the doubts dispelled. But the person whose questions are not legitimate is the one who already has his mind made up, who doesn't seek answers, but who seeks to use his questioning as an avenue to preach a message of defiance or doubt, and pour forth the voice of Satan. (3088:25,26)

J. Knowingly failing to report excommunicable offenses.

       As Dad has said, "Failure to report a crime is a crime" (ML #662:22). If, for example, a Family m ember sees, or knows about, an adult who is engaging in sex with a minor, or they know of someone who is sending CM literature to outsiders, then it is their duty to report it. If it is discovered that a member knew of such a situation and didn't report it to their shepherds, they will be excommunicated along with the person who has committed the offense.

       What's our common rule?—Failure to report a crime is a crime! Failure to report somebody breaking the rules is breaking the rules, and you're just as guilty as they are! (ML #1591:16.)

K. Continual breaking of, or the persistent disregard for the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or any of the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       As stated before, the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules" must be adhered to, obeyed, and followed by everyone if they wish to be Charter Members, unless there is a special circumstance that prevents them from doing so.

       Although it is understood that there will be special circumstances when certain rules can't be obeyed, if the special circumstances become the rule rather than the exception, and thus someone is continually breaking the rules, then they can be either fully or partially excommunicated. Of course, some effort by the teamwork should first be made to help the erring member correct their behavior, including personal counseling, assigning them a reading list on the subject, or Probationary Status, and so forth. But if these efforts fail, th en the member should be recommended for excommunication.

       So if a member persistently disregards the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules," they are in jeopardy of being excommunicated. The word "persistent" is defined as "persevering obstinately," and "disregard" is defined as "to pay no attention or heed to; to ignore." So if someone is stubbornly and obstinately paying no attention to or is willfully ignoring a clause in the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or flagrantly disobeying a Fundamental Family Rule, after being corrected for it, then they will face excommunication, either full or partial, depending on the situation. For instance, if a member's permission is withdrawn to remain in a specific country in accordance with the Procedures for Withdrawing Permission to Remain in a Country, and he flagrantly disobeys that order, he will be excommunicated.

       Excommunication means that a person loses his Family membership, as well as acce ss to all but GP/DFO Family literature and possibly fellowship. Partial Excommunication is a lesser form of disciplinary action that is determined by the continental office, which will result in the member losing his voting and mobility rights as well as certain privileges as outlined in the Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members.

       It's true also in the New Testament that if they continued to violate the rules and didn't heed the warnings, then they were excommunicated and put out of t he church or out of the Family, [out of] the Homes (ML #856:100).

       We do not accept people who don't abide by the rules. They're going to be reported by the officers and their name is going to be struck off the DO mailing list. It doesn't matter how much tithe they send in if they don't obey (ML #2531).

       This ends the Offenses Warranting Excommunication section. Now we move on to the other categories of behavior-related rules.

44. OUTREACH RULES

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A. All Home members 16 years of age and above must witness outside of the Home a minimum of two hours per week or eight hours per month, health permitting.

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1. The continental office may give exceptions to this rule in the case of behind-the-scenes Homes, or for individuals who are actively engaged in some form of witnessing within the Home, for at least the equivalent number of hours.

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       In the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" it is clear that both individuals and Homes are to engage in evangelism. Witnessing is what we are here for, it is one of the major goals of the Family. In order to ensure that we are fulfilling this responsibility, it is a rule that we all seek to meet a minimum requirement for getting out witnessing on a regular basis. Although witnessing should be encouraged for all ages, Homes are required to get all their voting members out witnessing at least two hours per week or eight hours per month. ( There may be some behind-the-scenes type Homes, like LIMs, or individuals who are actively engaged in some of form of witnessing within the Home, such as Bible classes or ministering to others by phone or mail/e-mail, who could, with continental office permission, have an exemption to this rule.)

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       Because children of all ages enjoy and benefit from witnessing, and it is part of their missionary training, we strongly recommend that all children have an opportunity to go out witnessi ng whenever practical. Families can go out witnessing together, for example, giving out tracts in the park, taking the children along for follow-up appointments, etc. However, children cannot be forced to go out witnessing against their will, which is why we've set the minimum age in this clause to 16. (For witnessing with children please see the Responsibilities of Parents, D. and Rights of Children, E.)

       This mandatory witnessing requirement also applies to all area officers. Due to the natur e of the responsibilities of continental officers, they are not required to engage in outreach but they are encouraged to personal witness when possible.

       The primary and first ministry of all of us is reaching the lost and reaching the people who need the Message! (ML #951:11.)

45. SCHOLASTIC AND SCHEDULE RULES

A. Schooling Hours during the school year:

1. For children ages 6 to 12: Enough time each week for them to become competent in a manner appropriate to their age, ability and aptitude in reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, practical-life skills, as well as other curricular subjects. (A minimum of twelve hours is suggested, although more or less time may be needed, depending on the child's age, ability and study habits.)

2. Fo r JETTs (ages 12 and 13): A minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week; aiming to complete a junior high school curriculum (approximately grade eight).

3. For junior teens (ages 14 and 15):

a) Junior teens who have completed their junior high school curriculum: A minimum of four hours of study time per week (vocational study and/or scholastics, as chosen by the teen). (Note: Vocational study refers to quiet study time or classes from the pubs or reference material. This is time other t han on-the-job vocational training.)

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b) Junior teens who have not completed a junior high school curriculum: A minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week; plus an optional four hours of vocational study.

4. For senior teens (ages 16 and 17):

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a) Senior teens who have completed a junior high school curriculum: A minimum of four hours of study time per week—vocational study and/or scholastics, as chosen by the teen. (Note: Vocational study refers to quiet study t ime or classes from the pubs or reference material. This is time other than on-the-job vocational training.)

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b) Senior teens who have not completed a junior high school curriculum: A minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week; plus an optional four hours of vocational/ministry study.

5. Two hours weekly of local language study for all children (ages 6 through 15) until they can speak the local language enough to capably converse and witness. This is in addition to the above- mentioned hours of scholastics, unless the children are schooled in the local language. JETTs' and teens' local language study can be incorporated into their witnessing.

a) National children, living in their own country, must be given the necessary time to learn to sufficiently converse in their national language.

       These are the minimum requirements for the schooling of our children. Please remember that our children have a right to an education as specified in the "Charter of Responsibiliti es and Rights." It is the responsibility of each Home and each parent to make sure that every child is receiving a proper education. Every Home must set aside the above listed minimum times for the education of their resident children; however, if the amount of schooling given during this time is not enough to give the children, or a specific child, the education guaranteed them in the Charter, then it must be increased.

       If the parents or the Home cannot supply an adequate education via home s chooling, they may need to consider outside schooling, private tutoring, etc. It is not enough for a Home to supply the minimum school time if it does not result in an adequate education for the children.

       The Junior High School curriculum, as referred to above, should cover at least a grade 8 level of education. For course materials, you could (1) develop a suitable program following the "Childcare Handbook" and the "Home Schooling Program," supplemented with appropriate reference books and ma terials; (2) use suitable Christian materials; and/or (3) use suitable secular study materials available in the local language.

       When JETTs graduate to junior teens at 14, they can begin their Christian Vocational College (CVC) program, pursuing their High School diploma and a number of Vocational and Christian Studies Proficiency Certificates, if they so desire. (Note: The completion of their Junior High School curriculum is included in the CVC Academic program.)

       While not considered "childr en" under the Charter, senior teens must also receive a sufficient education. They must fulfill a minimum of four study hours per week, or eight hours per week if they have not yet completed a junior high school curriculum.

       All children may seek official certification, or outside testing, of their home education if they or their parents desire.

       Those 18 and over may also continue their education by means of the CVC program, private study of other educational materials and resources, or outsi de school, classes or courses. They may also seek official certification of their home education if they so desire. (See also Rights of Children, F. and G. and Home Life Rules, J. )

       We've got what amounts to an education program with four major areas of learning: 1) Word studies, 2) Witnessing, 3) Scholastics, 4) Practical Life Skills or Vocational Training. Our goal has been to see that all these are covered properly (ML #2956:2).

       Because our Family is international and thus multilingual, there is a need for a common language, one in which most Family members can communicate. Because Dad and Mama's mother tongue is English, and thus our WS pubs are originally published in English, English has become the common language of the Family, the language that is generally spoken within the Homes. There are, of course, certain areas of the world where Home members speak the local language within the Home, which is commendable and encouraged where feasible and expedient.

       However, the fa ct that English is spoken in most of the Homes has sometimes made it difficult for the national children to become competent enough to witness in their national language. All of their friends within the Home speak English, and thus most of the day they converse in English rather than their national language. It is, however, very important that the national children living in their native country or language area learn to speak their national language. To accomplish this, our national children mu st be given the necessary time to learn their language.

       There may be times when an individual family will be in a foreign land, and not have the opportunity to use their national language. In such cases the parents should still try to speak to their children in their national language in order to teach their children their mother tongue. For example, if a Japanese family were to move to Australia, it would be beneficial for the parents to make an effort to regularly speak to their children in Japanese, so that their children will learn or retain their national language.

       Although it is only required that children (ages 6 through 15) have two hours of local language study per week, it is good for everyone in the Home to learn the local language so they can witness. This is especially true for our JETTs, and our junior and senior teens in countries where learning the local language is important, as otherwise they will have a more difficult time in their witnessing. Of course, the earl ier children begin learning other languages, the better.

       If you can't talk to folks and pray with them, it's pretty hard to win'm, and it's a little hard to convince them you love them if you're not even willing to learn their language (ML #1078:23).

       Little children's minds just sop up knowledge like that, it's wonderful. They say the best age to learn another language besides your native tongue is the early years, even as a preteen (ML #2208:57).

B. Children must be given sufficient Wo rd time, individually or in united classes, to consistently study and make significant progress in the Word Curriculum course for their age.

       To grow in faith and knowledge of the Lord, our children need to read God's Word. The Word Curriculum course has been designed to help them get the Word-based spiritual training they need. Each child should have their own copy of the Word Curriculum booklet (Kidz #79 and Hope #54, reprinted in the Childcare Reference Handbook), and their progress should b e recorded by marking the checklist.

       The primary factors necessary, of course, in raising children are the Word and the Lord and love! (ML #1396:1.)

       [The Word] has been the basic building block of our whole educational system! (ML #780:39.)

C. Minimum schedule requirements for school-age children (except for family day):

1. Nine hours sleep nightly for children ages 6 through 13.

2. Eight hours sleep nightly for junior teens (ages 14 and 15).

3. Two hours Word daily (may be united, private or a combination).

a) On days when school-age children and teens go witnessing, only one hour of Word time is required.

4. One-hour naptime or quiet time daily for children ages 6 through 13.

       All the above schedule requirements are minimums. The Home and the parents must see that children are provided the time and opportunity to get their minimum sleep and Word time. Since each child is different and has different needs, the amount of sleep needed will vary from child to chi ld, so the parents and the Home should take into account each child's needs.

       When children up through the age of 13 are out witnessing, it may be difficult for them to get a full nap, but hopefully it will be possible for them to have a quiet rest period.

       Although not required, some 14 and 15-year-olds may also need a daily or regular nap, or rest period. The need for rest time for that age group should be decided by the Home, in consultation with the 14 and 15-year-olds.

46. DISCIPLINE RULES

A. Child discipline in the Family is governed by the rules published in the "Family Discipline Guidelines," ML #2919, GN 591.

       A summary of the "Family Discipline Guidelines" can be found in Appendix E.

47. FOOD AND DRINK RULES

A. For health reasons, members should not eat Biblically unclean food (Leviticus 11:1-47), and should not serve it in the Home or order it in restaurants. (Two exceptions to this rule are ham and thoroughly cooked bacon.)

1. There are times when it may be necessary to eat such food, especially when you are a guest in someone's home, in which case you may "eat what is set before you, giving thanks."

       It is a Family belief that it is unhealthy to eat Biblically u nclean foods. There may be times when people will serve Biblically unclean food to you as their guest, and in such a case it would be unkind and unloving to your host not to eat it. There may also be times on rare occasions that a provisioning team is given something that is unclean; for instance, a pork roast. If your Home is in agreement, then you may proceed with serving it in your Home, but be sure you have the faith for it and that you faithfully pray a cleansing prayer over it (1Timothy 4: 5). Another example might be if you are eating pizza on a special occasion that had some pork sausage on it. Occasionally eating pork sausage on a pizza would be quite different than regularly eating pork sausage.

       As explained before, exceptions for rules can be made "only in a rare situation when warranted or in an unavoidable circumstance." If once in a great while an individual or Home eats something unclean, it would be considered "rare," which is defined as "occurring infrequently," so in such a case it would be permissible. However, if your provisioner was asking your meat contact for pork, or if your Home was requesting your provisioner try to provision unclean seafood, or if you have a choice between clean and unclean foods, and you choose the unclean, then this would be disregarding the rules.

       Each Home should do its best to provide a nutritious, well-balanced diet for all of its members, taking into account the special needs of babies, growing children, nursing and pregna nt mothers, the elderly, as well as the sick. They should avoid serving foods that the Bible teaches are unclean to the Home.

       It's against God's Bible laws to eat all that unclean meat, because they contain poisons and dangerous diseases that can sicken you, paralyze you, give you cholera and multitudes of other diseases that can kill you! (ML #609:85.)

       Of course there are times when you may have to eat [unclean foods] (1 Corinthians 10) for courtesy or when there is no alternative. (ML #6 09:P.S.)

       Out in evangelistic work we ate all kinds of things that people fed us, and we couldn't just sit there and turn up our noses at it, or it would have been a very insulting, ungrateful thing to do, discourteous to our hosts. ... So if for some reason you have to eat unclean food some time, just really pray over it! (ML #2347:80.)

B. Avoid eating foods and drinks with high sugar content, white sugar, bleached flour or rice and products made with such, and "junk food," except when unav oidable or on appropriate occasions.

       Family members should avoid, which means to shun, as much as possible the eating of any kind of unhealthy food. This means you should not only shun Biblically unclean foods, but also avoid foods and drinks with a high sugar content or other unhealthy or non-nutritious foods such as bleached white flour, white sugar and white rice.

       This is oftentimes more difficult when you get something to eat or drink when outside the Home. Ideally, you should not consum e any foods outside your Home that your Home would not have the faith to serve in your Home. Of course, if you are extremely thirsty and the only thing available to drink is a Cola, then you might have to drink it. But if there was something else available and safe to drink, which didn't have a high sugar content, then you should choose that instead. This is not a license to regularly eat food containing refined and bleached white starches or sugar, or drink beverages with high sugar content, ei ther at Home or when out.

       There are appropriate occasions for having foods that have sugar content or are made with white flour; for example, on a birthday you might have store-bought cake and ice cream. Ice cream, unless it's homemade, definitely has quite a bit of sugar in it, and would fall under the category of food that has high sugar content. However, it would be acceptable, because it is an appropriate occasion.

       The key word pertaining to this rule is "unavoidable." Remember the rule is to avoid unhealthy foods. If you are regularly eating and drinking such things, and are making an insufficient effort to acquire the proper types of food, you are breaking this rule and are subject to disciplinary measures.

       Nearly all the food value is gone after they've processed it, bleached it, cooked it, doctored it up and put preservatives in it and everything else to keep it from rotting. If they doctor it up so even the germs won't touch it, what is it going to do to you?—Monosodi um glutamate and all kinds of sticky gummy based poisons and whatnot in all those artificial foods. People eat all that artificial junk with all that artificial coloring, artificial this, artificial that, artificial flavoring, and by the time they're done they wonder if they ate anything that was real at all! (ML #353:117-118.)

       We've got to temper everything—like I put on the end of the "Food or Poison" Letter (No.609)—with a little moderation. There are always exceptions (ML #1236:4).

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C. In order to be moderate in alcohol consumption and to avoid its various negative effects, only one of the following are permitted as a weekly maximum alcohol limit for members over the age of 18, where legally permitted:

1. 12 ounces or 37.5 cl of wine.

       (or)

2. 8 ounces or 25 cl of sherry, port or vermouth or other drinks that are not more than 20% alcohol.

       (or)

3. 28 ounces or 84 cl of beer containing not over 6% alcohol.

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       These amounts of alcoholic bevera ges are the maximum allowed each week. This is not a recommendation for everyone to drink these amounts, it is just to establish the maximum allowable limits. All other alcoholic beverages, with an alcohol content of more than 20%, including whisky, gin, vodka, liqueurs, etc., are not permitted in a Family Home for the purpose of members' weekly ration, nor are they permitted to be drunk on special occasions or celebrations.

       This is not a right that gives you permission for weekly wine, but a rule letting you know that you cannot go over this specified amount. You'll notice that the drinking of alcoholic beverages is not listed under the Rights of the Individual in the Charter! In many countries, alcoholic beverages are very expensive and an unneeded luxury. If your Home doesn't have enough school supplies for your children, or enough tools for outreach, then you should question whether you could afford to buy alcoholic beverages for the Home.

       Those under the age of 18 are not perm itted to drink alcoholic beverages; however, in your own Home, on special occasions or celebrations, the Home could decide to let the teens drink a glass of wine or a punch which has some alcohol in it. Of course everyone, no matter what age, can partake of communion wine.

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4. On "special occasions," members are permitted to drink a maximum of 12 ounces or 37.5 cl of wine, 8 ounces or 25 cl of sherry (or similar beverage that does not exceed 20% alcohol), or 28 ounces or 84 cl of be er (that does not exceed 6% alcohol).

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a) No more than two "special occasions" may be held per month.

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       There also may be times when your Home has a celebration or a special event at which you wish to serve an alcoholic beverage, in addition to the standard weekly allowance which was or will be consumed on another occasion within the same week. These special occasions must be limited to not more than two per month. During these special occasions members are not permitte d to drink more than 12 ounces or 37.5 cl of wine, or 8 ounces or 25 cl of port or sherry (or similar beverages which do not exceed 20% alcohol) or 28 ounces or 84 cl of beer.

       Anybody who is not willing to obey and be cautious and conservative in their use of wine (or other alcoholic beverages), after sufficient warning, you'll have to ask them to leave (ML #856:95).

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D. In order to avoid the negative effect of caffeine, the daily maximum for any caffeinated beverage, such as co ffee, tea or cocoa, is two cups. Caffeinated coffee and tea are only for those 16 and over.

       Because caffeine is a stimulant and too much of it can cause health problems, the daily intake for caffeinated drinks is two cups. If you find that you suffer some ill effects of caffeine, such as bad temper, hyperactivity, nervousness, insomnia, etc., you may want to consider abstaining from it.

Drinking all that coffee just exhausts your adrenaline system, so when you need it you don't have it, and it's too much of a strain on your heart burning up so much energy! You're dumping fuel on the fire immoderately and then all of a sudden you run out of fuel—and then when you need it for warmth and strength, it's not there! ... "Abuse not the temple of the Holy Ghost!" "Be temperate in all things!" "Let your moderation be known to all men!" (1Corinthians 3:17; 9:25; Philippians 4:5.) (ML #66:3,5).

48. GET-OUT RULES

A. Members over the age of 18 must have regular and sufficient exercise as well as fresh air, weather permitting, not less than four times per week, unless too ill to do so.

1. The type, amount and intensity of exercise and physical activity depends on the age, health and physical condition of the individual, so each member's get-out should be appropriate to the individual's needs and capabilities.

       Those over 18 need to have regular get-out time in the fresh air not less than four times per week in order to qualify as having sufficient exercise. Of course, the ideal is that everyone has a vigorous get-out every single day, but in many cases that just is not realistic or practical, so if it were required, nearly everyone would be a rule-breaker. We believe that four times a week is a realistic minimum.

       If the weather is such that you can't do your get-out outdoors, you can still have vigorous exercise indoors.—And if you open a window you'll get fresh air as well.       Different people have different needs regarding the level of activity that they can, or should, do on get-out. For some older adults, taking a walk may be vigorous get-out, but the same walk may not be sufficient for a YA or teen. They might need something much more vigorous. So an adult should not expect that a walk or a leisurely bike ride is always enough get-out for a JETT or teen. Also, a witnesser who gets plenty of exercise and fresh air while out, may not need to have an offici al get-out on witnessing days, but would need get-out on other days. Be aware that different people have different needs, and try to accommodate them as much as possible.

       For God's sake, get out and flush out your lungs in the fresh air and your blood with a little exercise, and get some sunshine that'll kill the rest of the germs—it's important! You can't just go out and do it once a week (ML #1031:64).

B. Members under the age of 18 must have regular and sufficient exercise, as well as fresh air, weather permitting, of at least one hour (preferably 90 minutes), not less than five times per week, unless too ill to do so.

1. Get-out activities must be age-appropriate. For example, a teen might be allowed to engage in activities that a younger child may not be able to.

       Those under the age of 18 must have get-out a minimum of five times per week, but daily is recommended. Children will also benefit from short periods of recess or play time outdoors throughout the day, in add ition to their minimum daily get-out time.

       The activities that our teens and children engage in need to be age-appropriate. For example, you wouldn't let a young child climb a tree because it is not safe, but you might allow a prayerful and careful JETT or teen to do so, because for them it might be safe.

       The point is that some of the things that you wouldn't allow young children to do, you could let JETTs or young teens do. There are even some activities like climbing trees and roller blading which Mama said our kids shouldn't do, that she now considers may be allowed if age-appropriate. Although it wouldn't be wise to allow young children to do some of these activities, it might be perfectly okay for older ones. If it's an appropriate activity for an older teen, then they can be allowed to do it, whereas a younger child or even a younger teen might not be able to do it.

       You will also notice there is no list of activities that people cannot do. This means that if someone feels a n activity is okay and they pray, look to the Letters, and get the agreement of their Home about it, then they may do it.

       For example, body building: We don't think body building for the sake of building huge muscles is good, because it can be a pride trip. However, we're not specifically outlawing all exercise using weights. Lifting weights, when done for the purpose of vigorous exercise could be beneficial, especially in places where the weather is poor and it is difficult to have regular ou tdoor get-out.

C. As many sports are competitive, a certain amount of competition is to be expected. However, being overly or aggressively competitive or causing harm to oneself or others is not allowed.

       Generally, most sports have a certain amount of competitiveness. For example, in playing a game of birdie or tennis, there is a measure of competitiveness, but it's the spirit and degree of the competitiveness that makes the difference. If someone is aggressively competitive and their serve is so hard and fast that you would have to be a professional player to even return the serve, then that's being overly aggressive! Or when playing basketball, football or other such games, hogging the ball and having excessive body contact would also fall into the same category. The purpose of playing a game of tennis or a game of birdie or any other game is for exercise and enjoyment. The mild competitiveness is what makes the game fun, but if people get so involved that they get into the wron g spirit and hurt others, either by injuring them or making them feel bad through overly competitive or aggressive actions or unkind and unloving words, then it's not good. If it has reached the degree of competitiveness that it comes close to portraying the spirit of war, as Dad explains in "Are You a Good Sport" (ML #179A), then it's out of line. But a little competition mixed with good sportsmanship isn't necessarily a bad thing in itself.

       The main thing to remember in doing get-out is to p ray.—And play it safe! Remember, the Law of Love also applies to get-out! Love is more important than winning, and many times greater joy and lessons come out of being a levelheaded and safe player, or even a good loser.

       There's nothing wrong with kids playing games. They need too once in a while. It provides fresh air, exercise, relaxation of mind, opportunity for learning to get along with others, etc. (ML #2526:42).

       I think maybe some of you forget that you're not out there to go to the extreme just to try to win, you're out there for exercise and for enjoyment, health, fresh air and sunshine (ML #2082:7).

49. DRIVING RULES

A. Men or women driving a motor vehicle on a public road must have a valid driver's license for the class of vehicle being driven, and must be familiar with and obey the driving regulations of the country.

       Only those with valid driver's licenses should be allowed to drive on public roads. An unspoken Family rule seems to have developed that only men should drive. We would like to dispel this notion, which is why you will notice that the rule states that both qualified m en and women may drive.

       Be sure ... that every driver has a bona fide license (ML #1067:173).

       Obey the traffic regulations and signs! They're for your own safety and that of others. You were supposed to have had to read them and pass a test on them before getting your driver's license, but if you don't remember them, you'd better study them again before taking a trip (ML #150:56).

B. Any vehicle that is in use on public roads must be properly registered and insured according to the laws of the country.

C. All vehicles in use must be safe, well maintained and in good running condition, otherwise they should not be used.

       Dad has written extensively on vehicle safety. Unfortunately, for many Homes the criterion for using a vehicle is "does it move and will it get us where we want to go?" Driving a vehicle is dangerous enough without driving one with faulty or weak brakes, no lights, or bald tires, etc.

       If your Home is using a vehicle, it is the Home's responsibility to mak e sure it is legally registered, insured and safe. Perhaps a good way to judge if a car is safe is to ask yourself if you would feel confident enough to take Mama or Peter for a ride in it. We recommend that your Home appoint a vehicle deacon to make sure the cars are well maintained.

       An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. A few ounces of proper maintenance and constant checking of your vehicle will save you many pounds of expensive repairs and costly delays. It's just being faithf ul stewards! (ML #150:32.)

       Be sure that your vehicle papers are also kept up-to-date in proper order, with proper insurance and all the rest, so that doesn't cause you trouble (ML #1067:173).

D. Only prayerful, careful, and safe drivers should be permitted to drive. Any driver who causes an accident should generally have his driving privilege suspended for an appropriate period of time, which is to be decided upon by the Home.

       Some people who have valid driver's licenses really aren't ver y good drivers. So if someone is not prayerful and/or careful or safe, then the Home may vote to revoke their driving privilege, at least for a given period of time.

       If a driver causes an accident, they should lose their driving privilege for a period of time, which should be decided by the Home's voting members. This does not mean that any driver that is involved in an accident should lose the privilege. A driver may be in an accident that was not his fault. If he was stopped at a traffic lig ht and someone smashed into the rear end of the car, that's not his fault, he just happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, though there may be a lesson to be learned from it.

       But any driver who causes an accident, or who has to be repeatedly warned about reckless or unsafe driving, including speeding or not tuning in to his or her driving, should have his or her driving ability questioned. If someone hits somebody or smashes into another car, it brings up the obvious question of w hy it happened. Was the driver not paying attention? Was he or she being unsafe, unprayerful? Is the Lord trying to get through to him or her on something, etc.? As driving is such an important responsibility, in that you risk your life, the lives of your passengers and the lives of those that are around you and in other vehicles, anyone who causes an accident should have their driving privilege suspended for a period of time. As Dad admonished, "The driver's seat is one of the most responsible and dangerous positions in the world! Take it seriously and ask God for help" (MOP 4:1).

       The appropriate period of time would have to be decided by the Home. If someone causes a minor accident, denting a fender, maybe he shouldn't drive for a short period of time, but if he causes a major accident, maybe he should have his driving privilege suspended for six months, a year, or longer. However, the penalty cannot always be determined only from the seriousness of the accident. Perhaps the lesser accident was just the Lord's mercy on the Home, but indicates a much more serious problem with the driver. The Home will have to decide.

       Drivers should be safety-conscious at all times, and may need to go above and beyond the local regulations and customs in some countries not known for their traffic safety standards.

       Driving in bad weather conditions can be very hazardous. When there is hard rain or when fresh snow is falling, avoid driving if you have a choice. Try to determine in advance the weather conditions where you plan to drive to. Getting caught in a storm front, freezing rain, etc., can be disastrous, and you could find yourself in terrible driving conditions, even though the place you came from wasn't experiencing bad weather when you left.

       Driving is serious business in which everyone involved is in a potentially dangerous situation, and therefore requires a great deal of prayerfulness. It would be good for the driver and the passengers to make it a habit of frequen tly praying aloud for the Lord's help and protection. Passengers should be mindful of the driver and should not distract him; they should be watchful and in prayer for the driver. The person sitting in the front seat next to the driver should consider it his or her job to be the "driver's buddy" and assist the driver in every way possible and needed. Sometimes it's good and important to talk to the driver to keep him from dozing off at the wheel, especially if driving in the evening or in very h ot weather, etc.

       Any one of you who gets a traffic ticket should have to pay the penalty for breaking the law, and also write a full report for your Colony shepherd or supervisor, telling exactly how it happened.—And if you persistently prove you're a poor driver or even accident-prone, you should be grounded either permanently or until you've proven you have learned your lesson, repented, and can drive safely. Maybe you should even have to read this Letter through about ten times or memori ze the parts you need or violated! (ML #150:57).

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E. The following five requirements must be adhered to by all new Family drivers.

1. Read FSM 296 and all of the Letters available to you from the required reading list on pgs.9-10 of the FSM.

2. Take and pass the written test on page 13 of FSM 296.

3. A new (or inexperienced) driver must complete 20 hours of supervised driving with a competent Family driver, and must satisfy this Family driver's assessment of their driving. (Hours of driving training at a recognized driving academy or school may be counted toward the 20 hours of supervised driving time.)

a) An already experienced driver who has a valid driver's license and considerable Family driving experience, and who receives a recommendation from two of the Home officers that he/she is a safe, competent driver, does not have to meet the 20-hour requirement.

4. Two of the Home officers must sign your Family Driving Certificate before it is valid.

5. Onc e you have received a Family Driving Certificate, a simple majority vote of the Home's members, in each Home you go to, will then enable you to become a driver for that Home. Remember their lives will be in your hands when driving!

       The term "new driver" used above not only applies to those who have just recently acquired a driver's license, which would generally be a senior teen or YA, but also those older Family members who may have had a driver's license for a number of years, but due to lac k of actual driving experience may not be a qualified driver. In such a case, a Home may decide that these drivers need to have some recent hands-on experience before they can drive a van full of children or take witnessing teams out, etc. They may therefore vote in the same requirements that a new driver is expected to meet before getting their card—that is, 20 hours driving time plus approval from the teamworkers.

       The supervised driving time would not necessarily need to be official "driver training," as our Homes probably don't have time for this in their busy schedules, but can be on-the-job practice. For example, an 18-year-old could do provisioning pickups with an experienced licensed driver in the car, who could instruct the new driver during the course of the day's driving. However, we do not recommend that new or inexperienced drivers drive a van full of people before getting their Family Driving Certificate.

       While we are stipulating that two Home teamworkers and a competent Family driver can approve a "new" driver, after he or she has had their 20 hours of driving experience, the Home itself should also be in general agreement with the individual driving. Any voting member in a Home has the right to bring up in a Home council meeting the subject of driving and/or a specific driver if they feel he or she doesn't drive safely, to be discussed and/or voted on by the Home. In other words, those riding in a vehicle driven by a designated Home driver should have a reasonable amount of confidence in the driver's abilities, and if they don't, they have every right to bring it up for discussion in the proper forum.

50. WORD RULES

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      One of the prime ingredients for success in our service for the Lord is His Word. We are adding a Word Rules section to the "Fundamental Family Rules" so that each Family member will be aware of the Word requirements for all Charter Members.

Charter Members must:

A. Spend a minimum of 1½ hour daily (or 10½ hours weekly) in communion with the Lord through the reading of His Word and other WS publications (privately or unitedly), personal prayer or hearing fro m the Lord in prophecy.

       Family members should have 1½ hour daily, or 10½ hours weekly, of Word, prayer and hearing from the Lord, as outlined in "The Spiritual Health Revolution" GN 789, ML #3184.—This is not the recommended amount of personal time with the Lord, it is the minimum.

1. Disciples under one year in the Family must be allocated an additional 7 hours per week, or a total of 17½ per week, in order to complete their study of the full foundation course for new disciples in one yea r, as well as to complete their basic memory work.

       New disciples need to get their grounding in the Word before they get embroiled full-time in other ministries. In order to make it possible for them to complete the reading and studying of the foundation Letters listed in Appendix F: Babes Basic Course and Appendix H: Priority Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family, an additional 7 hours per week must be allotted by the Home for this specific purpose. It's preferable that this add itional Word time be on a daily basis, or at least spread throughout several time slots during the week, but not less than 7 additional hours of Word time per week. It is estimated that these reading courses can be completed within one year of a new disciple joining if this minimum time is allotted for it.

       An exception to this rule would be for live-outs, catacombers or Fellow Members changing to CM who may already have this foundation from years of reading the Word before joining the Family, who may not need a full year to finish the course. But they should be given this additional time for up to one year to complete this course according to what the Home teamwork deems to be necessary. (See also Responsibilities of the Charter Home Regarding the Welfare of Its Members, A. 2. a.)

B. Live in accordance with the Word by endeavoring to apply the spiritual and practical counsel given in the Letters to their daily lives. (See also Responsibilities of Individual Members, D.)

C. Duri ng the year preceding their 16th birthday, members must read the following publications in preparation for becoming a voting member.

       "The Love Charter" ("Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and "Fundamental Family Rules")

       To prepare teens for becoming voting members of their Homes, they need to read through the Love Charter during the year preceding their 16th birthday. It is a vitally important document, so reading through it should help them to grasp the general policies by which the F amily is governed, so as to be prepared for making responsible decisions when they become voting members. To break this hefty project into smaller chunks, we suggest the reading of it be divided into quarters as follows:

       First quarter: From Dad's Introduction, to the end of the Rights and Responsibilities of Charter Members.

       Second quarter: Responsibilities and Rights of the Charter Home and Responsibilities and Authority of Charter leadership.

       Third quarter: Procedures and "Fundamental Fa mily Rules," up to and including the Health and Hygiene Rules.

       Last quarter: "Fundamental Family Rules," from Sex and Affection Rules to the end of the rules section, plus Home Election Guidelines and the Family Discipline Guidelines Summary.

       "Moving Forward—The Need for Change" (Peter 76, GN 615, Lifelines 22)

       "Understanding the Spirit of the Charter" (Peter 77, GN 621, Lifelines 22)

       "Serve One Another in Love!—Mama's Epilogue to the Love Charter" (ML #2978, GN 623, Lifelines 22)

       "Loving Shepherding and Interaction Charter Style" (ML #3018, GN 661, Lifelines 22)

D. During the last three months before turning 16, members must read the following publications, together with a parent or shepherd, before they will permitted to have sexual contact (within the Charter-specified age guidelines) once they turn 16:

       "Revolutionary Lovemaking" (ML #259, Vol. 2)

       "Questions & Answers on Sex, Freedoms and Relationships" (DB 11, ML #2718, Lifelines 22)

       "Teen Sex Policies" (Pete r #81 and Summit prophecies, Lifelines 22)

       "Go for the Gold" (ML #2961, Lifelines 22)

       "Mama's Memos!—No. 4. A How-to of the Practical Application of `Going for the Gold'!" (ML #3138, Lifelines 24)

E. Also, 16 year olds are required to read the following with their parents or shepherds before they begin having any sexual contact with others in their age group.

       "Living the Lord's Law of Love" series (in full, starting with ML #3201, GN 804, Lifelines 25.)

F. In addition to the above L etters, we recommend that the following pubs be read by teens before they turn 16. These could be read on their own or with a parent or shepherd.

1. "All About Growing Up" (in Childcare Reference Handbook)

2. "Mama's Love Story! Parts 5 and 6" (ML #2996, ML #3001, both in Lifelines 22)

G. Once they turn 16, members should be given the opportunity to read the full version of the following publications found in Lifelines 25, which they were unable to read previously:

       "Loving Jesus!—Par t 3" (ML #3029, GN 662)

       "Loving Jesus!—Part 4" (ML #3030, GN 662)

       "Loving Jesus!—Part 5" (ML #3031, GN 663)

       "Loving Jesus!—Part 6" (ML #3032, GN 664)

       "Loving Jesus!—Part 7" (ML #3033, GN 665)

       "What a Husband and Lover," (ML #3098, GN 719, Lifelines 25)

       "Golden Victories" (ML #3162, GN 768)

51. HOME LIFE RULES

A. When one leaves the Home's property, he or she should go with another member as a safety precaution, in accordance with the Scriptural admonition in Luke 10:1. There may be times when this is not possible, but such times should be infrequent and generally only for emergencies, or for a good reason agreed to by a Home officer.

       Going two by two is Scriptural and a wise principle that Jesus established, and this rule has been in place since the beginning of the Family . There are, of course, times when it's not possible to go two-by-two, but for the most part, members should. When it is deemed not possible, it should be with the agreement of a Home teamwork member.

       In most cases you should try to take as a partner someone who is able to be of assistance in case of an emergency. For instance, your partner should be old enough and responsible enough to telephone the Home in case of any problems or if they were to get separated from you. Determining whether a child is responsible enough to be a partner on a particular occasion will also depend on where you are going, how far from Home, if you will be driving or taking public transport, etc., and should be a matter that is counseled about and agreed upon by the Home teamwork.

       Our rule [is] going at least two by two wherever you go, not only for strength and companionship, but also for the sake of safety and a legal witness and emergency messenger in case anything happens that needs help! (ML #155: 65).

B. Homes should take precautions to keep their mailing and other address lists secure.

       The names, mailing addresses, and telephone numbers of provisioning and other contacts are your private business and therefore should be kept safe and secure. It's very important to keep such files secure, and encrypted when possible, and/or in a safe place, so they will not be stolen or fall into the hands of our detractors or others.

       The most important thing to protect is the work and the Famil y, and first of all, that means your mailing list, the addresses of Homes and families throughout the land (ML #953-2:1).

       Be sure you don't betray your own brethren by not having destroyed all excess files and records and correspondence and stats and names and addresses, only keeping the ones you absolutely have to have for reference! (ML #1889:97.)

C. Computer files (other than programs) must be kept encrypted, and be "wiped" after they have been erased.

       Computers are capable of storing a great deal of information, much of which is private. Personal and Home computer files should be encrypted when not in use so the information will not be stolen. When a file is deleted, it should be "wiped" to ensure that the file or disk is totally wiped clean. Simply erasing or deleting a file does not take the information off the computer; it basically only takes the file name off and the actual text can still be retrieved from the hard disk or floppy disk.

       These [communications] all mus t be very secure, including our records and stats, etc., and not permitted to be neglected or kept in unsafe places or operated unsafely with any measure of insecurity, if at all possible (ML #1677:26).

D. Members must endeavor to protect the safety and security of their Home and other Homes.

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1. Homes wishing to pub their street, PO box or e-mail address, or their telephone number in any continental or WS publication, must have a majority agreement of their Home to do so. A Home teamwork member must submit the request.

       See LNF 260 for more details on this.

       Security is essential to success if we're going to survive and keep going and keep preaching and keep our lives and disciples and continue the Message with the men and the methods and the organization and communications (ML #1677:26).

E. Selah trash is to be burned or shredded regularly (recommended daily).

       Be very sure that no confidential materials or papers or identifying envelops, etc., bearing names , addresses, or other selah information is ever placed in trash containers which are emptied by the System! Burn or destroy these separately in your own wood stove or fireplace (ML #155:51).

F. Members must keep their personal legal papers in order and up to date.

       Members need to make sure that they have copies of their legal documents available. It's wise to carry sufficient and appropriate identification with you when you're off the Home's property. What you would choose to carry would de pend on where you live. In many places a driver's license or local identification card will suffice. In other places a photocopy of your passport would be enough. If you have to carry your actual passport, please make sure it is kept in a safe place, like in a money belt, or in a neck pouch inside your shirt.

       In some countries carrying identification is not required by law; however, it is a good safety precaution to carry ID at all times when out.

       Everyone's papers and passports and visas should be in order (ML #1067:140).

       You don't always have to use your precious passport itself for identification! Sometimes just a driver's license or registration card or some other personal I.D. will do (ML #1021:5).

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G. To ensure the privacy of our members and their Homes, members should preferably use modem communications instead of live phone calls between Homes. Additionally, e-mail or other modem communications between Homes should be secure.

       Some areas may have had certa in local rules concerning whether Homes could call other Homes, or their area office, directly from their Home. Any such rules should be decided upon by a Home referendum of all the Homes in that area.

       Using modems is the preferred method of communicating by phone because, among other things, it saves time and money. It also helps to eliminate misunderstandings because the message is written instead of simply spoken. We realize that not every Home will always have a modem, but no matter what p hone methods you use, you should make sure you are being wise and secure in what you say on the phone. More and more as time goes on, phone communications are becoming easier for others to listen in on, particularly cellular phones.

H. Homes that consist of four or less voting members must have at least some of their members meet for fellowship and prayer with another nearby Home a minimum of once a month. A "nearby Home" is one that is not more than two hours away by land or water transporta tion.

       Although our larger Homes have a greater measure of fellowship, such is not the case with smaller Homes. And because we feel that Homes with four or less voting members may become rather dry spiritually without fellowship with other Homes, we want to encourage them to have regular fellowship with other Family members. However, in light of the time and logistics involved in organizing such a fellowship, it is only required that such small Homes fellowship with other Homes if they are near by.

       If the rule were to state that every Home that has four voting members or under must visit another Home once a month, it might cause a great deal of hardship in some cases. For example, if the nearest Home is 1,000 miles away and you must go there every month, that is going to be very expensive and quite taxing. You'd either have to fly, or it would take a day or two to drive there and another day or two to drive back, plus the day of fellowship, so that's five days out of your month!

       If the nearby Home is a maximum of two hours away by car, bus, train or ferry, then it is much more feasible to visit once a month. The travel and fellowship time could be done in one day and shouldn't cause any undue hardship. Exceptions may be made for reasons of health.

       There are times when you need to fellowship and share each other's problems and joys and victories and projects and plans and needs, etc. It certainly is a command of the Lord by the Holy Spirit through His Apostle that you should assemble yourselves together! (ML #1001:55, 98.)

       [If] a large Home is already having good fellowship within their Home, then we won't require that they fellowship with another Home. But I still feel they should try to, at least occasionally (ML #2532:9).

I. The Home decides, by a two-thirds majority, if any of its members may take outside employment or engage in business, which members may do so, and what employment may be taken, or business engaged in.

       In some cases, some Home mem bers might desire to take a secular job or perhaps run a business, as a means of support. As the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" does not specifically prohibit it, it is generally allowed. We are not recommending it, but it's not forbidden. Since such a decision affects the Home, financially and otherwise, it will be the Home that decides, by two-thirds majority, if they will allow any of their members to get a job. They should also discuss and decide who can get a job and what kind of job is acceptable. Remember, if you want to get a certain job and the Home doesn't want you to, the Home's decision prevails; but you can seek out another Home or start your own if you don't want to abide by the decisions of the Home you are in.

       We believe you should certainly pray that if the Lord wants you to take on one of those System jobs, that He will open up the one for you that will be the most fruitful in witnessing as well as in support, and the one least demanding in hours, subjec t matter and other requirements (ML #2406:107).

J. The Home decides, by a two-thirds majority, if any of its children, teens or adults may attend outside schools or engage in outside classes, who may do so, and what schools or classes may be attended.

       Similar to the situation with adults getting outside employment, the Charter does not specifically prohibit children attending System school, so it is generally allowed. We are not recommending it, but it's not forbidden. Since such a decision affects the Home, it will be the Home that decides, by two-thirds majority, if they will allow any of their children to attend outside schools. The voting members should also discuss and decide which children should go to an outside school and what kind of situation is acceptable. Remember, if you want to send your children to a certain school and the Home doesn't want you to, the Home's decision prevails; but you can seek out another Home or start your own if you don't want to abide by the dec isions of the Home you are in.

       Some of the teens or adults may want to attend a night class on some subject that would be helpful to their ministry or that they have a particular interest in. If the Home is in agreement with the plan and the subjects, they can vote to allow it.

       We're for the most part trying to encourage [the Family] that they can teach their own children, have their own childcare workers and their own teachers, if possible. If not, they can send them to the local System [ school] if they have to! (ML #332B:80.)

K. It is recommended that members select movies they view from the "Movie Lists" published by World Services and follow the advice as to the selection of the film, the age group for which the film is suggested, and the appropriateness of the film for the target audience. It is not recommended that you watch a movie that is not on the list, but it's not forbidden.

       If you feel that a movie (or portions of it) is suitable for an age group younger than th e suggested rating, you may show it to them, provided you have previewed the movie, and counseled about its suitability with a responsible adult.

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1. If a Home plans to watch a movie that is not listed on a WS Movie List (or other Family publication), the Home must appoint a preview committee of at least two members 18 or older to judge the suitability of the movie and the age group(s) to which it can be shown. It is recommended that if possible, a member of the Home's officers be o n the preview committee. The previewing committee has the authority to disqualify a movie for Home viewing.

a) An exception to this rule could be if the movie has already been previewed and recommended by another Home previewing team who has watched the movie with the age group they are recommending it for, or by an area or continental officer.

       We realize that it's not always possible to select movies from the WS movie guides. But we feel it is imperative that any movies not chosen from the WS movie guide be screened and approved by a preview committee before being shown to the entire Home or groups of the Home's teens or children. Therefore we have amended the Charter to make it a rule that any movies not on a WS-recommended movie list be previewed before being watched by the Home.

       We hope that in most cases, Homes will select the movies they watch from those rated by WS in the Grapevine, Family Movie Guides or other Family publications. However, in cases where rated films are unavailable and/or the Home wants to watch a film that has not yet been rated (such as a new release), it's important that the film first be "screened" in order to make sure it is appropriate for the Home, particularly if the planned audience will include teens, JETTs or children. In other words, the Home teamwork must not go solely on the recommendation of someone who may have seen the movie (unless the recommendation comes from another Home's teamwork or an area or continental officer, as expl ained above). They should appoint a Home previewing team of at least two people, including a teamwork member if possible, responsible to preview the movie.

       While this may be an inconvenience, it will save time in the long run from having to deal with the negative repercussions that a bad movie could have on people. You may want to review what Dad has said in the Letters about System movies to help your Home in previewing and selecting videos.

       I think the choice of movies for young people— children and teenagers—is extremely serious and should be taken very soberly, and the adults should make sure that it's the right kind of movie to really portray the right things in the right light and with a good lesson application at the end that will stick with them (ML #2451:47).

L. Because of the unedifying nature of a great deal of System music, Family members must follow the counsel given in the MLs and other Family publications when selecting music to listen to, such as "New Music fo r a New Day" (ML #3022, GN 658, Lifelines 22).

       There is an extremely wide spectrum of System music, some of which is Godly and edifying and much of which is not. It is not possible to legislate exactly what kinds of music can and cannot be listened to. There are a number of Letters from Dad and Mama, as well as various Hope Mags and other pubs on the subject that give the guidelines for listening to System music. Family members are expected to follow this counsel when selecting music to listen to.

       Some of music's message is the deafening roar of Satan himself—the old lion going around seeking whom he may devour. [But] the sweet, heavenly music lifts you into heavenly spheres, transports your spirit into heavenly places and makes you want to be good and do good, and inspires you to higher things—this is the Voice of God! (ML #326:28,29.)

       (Maria:) Grandpa has explained many times that music is very powerful, and it can have either a positive or negative effect on us. Music is a vehicle for the spirits who inspired the composers to convey their message to generations afterwards. Knowing this, we can all agree that listening to the wrong music is like playing with fire (ML #2891:55).

M. Members who wish to read books or have their children read books other than educational textbooks, or those on the recommended book lists, must receive the agreement of a simple majority of their Home.

       Ecclesiastes 12:12 says, "Of making many books there is no end." The World is ful l of millions upon millions of books, some good, some bad, some edifying, others not. It would be impossible for WS to make a comprehensive list of acceptable books as we have done with movies. Because of this, if someone in the Home wishes to read a book, other than an educational textbook or a book included in a WS recommended book list, they must first explain to their Home which book they wish to read, and the Home must agree by a simple majority.

       Like movies or music, books are spiritual food, and if you eat bad food, it does you harm. Certainly not all books are bad, but neither are all good, so care must be taken in the choice of reading material, especially in our busy lifestyle. Although some books, like some novels, are not unedifying, they nevertheless generally take a fairly long time to read, which would take away from our more important duties like reading the Word, witnessing, fellowshipping with others, etc. When deeply engrossed in the reading of a novel, the reader can often tune out what is going on around them and become absorbed in and sometimes even addicted to the novel. Such absorption can be spiritually detrimental. For this reason it is necessary for the Home to come to an agreement if they will permit a member to read a specific book other than educational textbooks or those on the recommended book lists.

       Books were my downfall. They nearly ruined me! I oughta know—I used to have a whole roomful of 'em, so many I couldn't even read 'em all, u ntil the Lord showed me I didn't have time to read books if I didn't have enough time to read my Bible (ML #54:45).

       Each book would have to be judged individually. Moreover, it would probably depend a great deal on the person themselves and what effect the book would have on them. ... I'm quite surprised to think that our young people would have a lot of extra time to read, especially considering that there are thousands of pages of past Letters, and hundreds of pages of new literature being p rinted each month on many different subjects. I know that other books have their appeal, but the Letters have the power to give us the strength for these Endtime battles. There are a lot of other books that are good and interesting and informative, but if they take away from our time in the Word, they can be detrimental to our spiritual—and even our practical—growth (ML #2931:21,22).

       The criterion is not "Will it hurt'm?" but "Is it good for'm?"—Is it edifying, profitable, inspiring and doe s it teach a good lesson? (ML #1643:136.)

       It's so much simpler to do the things that make us feel good and don't require such a spiritual effort or struggle. It's so much easier and more fun to sit down with some System novel and escape into the world of romance, mystery or adventure.—And once you get hooked, to keep doing it over and over again. ... The Enemy has many ways of lulling us to sleep and of getting us to waste God's precious time with activities that don't count towards Eternity (ML #2931:76,79).

       If [our school-aged children are] interested in poetry or various other kinds of literature, you could let them read it if they want to, the writings of various famous poets and authors like Shakespeare, Scott, etc. If they want to read books, let them read historical fiction or just plain straight history. ... (Maria: There'd be enough special projects just stemming from the MO Letters, things that they'd want to learn more about.) (ML #371:46,47).

52. HEALTH AND HYGIENE RULES

       There are many guidelines and much counsel given in the Letters and other WS publications regarding health and hygiene. Even though they are not listed here as rules, this counsel is extremely beneficial and should be seriously considered and followed whenever applicable. All we have listed here are the basic health and hygiene rules, which include:

A. Smoking of any substance is forbidden.

       This covers smoking cigarettes, cigars, pipes or any other substa nce people can smoke.

       Smoking and drugs in the Family are against our laws and our rules and always have been (ML #856:92).

B. Any Home that has a member with a fever or contagious disease must inform other Homes before any personnel moves or visits take place between their Homes. Homes reserve the right to deny permission for visitation on the grounds of sickness.

       Please try to avoid spreading infectious diseases to other Homes. If members of your Home have a fever or a sickness that i s infectious, it would be best to avoid visiting other Homes. Please be prayerful and understanding in these matters, and if a Home asks you not to visit, because either their Home or yours have sickness, please comply graciously.

       If any outsiders request to come to your Home when someone in the Home has an infectious illness, you should tell them that some members are ill and suggest that it might be wiser for them to postpone their visit. If they still want to come, you can accommodate their request, but at least you have informed them of the illness.

       Diseases are one thing we shouldn't share!—And of course, if you shouldn't spread it even within your own Home, for God's sake don't share it with others at a meeting of any kind. Sorry—stay home! (ML #1280:1.)

53. SEX AND AFFECTION RULES

A. See Offenses Warranting Excommunication for excommunicable sexual offenses.

B. The "Law of Love" must govern all sexual activity. The basic tenet of the Law of Love is that what is done is agreed upon by all the parties involved, and precautions are taken so others are not hurt by their activities.

       One of the main things that sets us apart from other churches is the Biblical freedom that we have the faith to practice under the Law of Love, especially our sexual freedom. The sexual freedoms the Lord has allowed us are a beautiful and fruitful part of our faith. Having the opportunity to share sexually within our Homes brings about a unity and love that is not present in other churches. It is especially helpful in our communal lifestyle as it draws us closer to each other and to the Lord.

       Sharing sexually is a delicate matter since it deals with our emotions and the emotions of others. Because of this the Law of Love must govern our sexual free doms to ensure that others will not be hurt, and we will not be guilty of purposely or unwittingly hurting others. These Sex and Affection Rules are designed to help us live within the boundaries of the Law of Love.

       The above clause stipulates that the parties involved must be in agreement with engaging in sexual activity. As to who is an "involved party": In the case of a married person who is planning to share with someone else, that person's mate is one of the parties involved. If a wife fe els that a single brother in the Home needs sexual fellowship, or if she has been asked by him to share sexually, then her mate must agree to it, as he is an involved party; if he doesn't agree, then she should not do it.

       Of course, according to the Law of Love the husband should be loving enough to share his wife with a brother in need. Likewise, the wife and the single brother should be loving enough to understand if the husband has difficulty with it.

       For a different scenario, let's take a case of a single woman and two single men in the Home: The single sister decides she would like to share with one of the single brothers, but the other single brother happens to have intimate feelings for her, and might feel somewhat jealous about this date taking place. In this case, the single woman does not need to get his consent or agreement because he is not an involved party. He has no say over what she does because she's not his mate and therefore does not need to be consulted.

       Howev er, you'll notice that the second part of this clause states that precautions must be taken so that others are not hurt by the activity. In this scenario, if the single woman and the single man are planning to have a date, they should be considerate of the single brother who has feelings for the girl, and take precautions, at least as much as is possible, so as not to hurt him. For example, the date could happen when this single brother is out witnessing or is watching a movie or is doing someth ing else. Or at the very least, when these two share they should try to do so in a place where this fellow will not overhear them.

       We need to do all we can to avoid hurting others. Of course, sometimes people are hurt regardless of the precautions we attempt to take. Let's go back to the married couple spoken of before: The wife is planning to share with the single brother, and though the husband gave his agreement, it is still possible that the husband might be hurt.—He might experience some jealousy, or generally find it difficult to share his wife with someone else. However if, because he believes in the Law of Love, he consents to be hurt, in a sense, by agreeing that his wife should share with a brother in need, then this is acceptable; in fact, commendable. That's the sacrificial side of the Law of Love and of sharing.

       Of course, there may be times when the wife and the single brother might need to refrain in deference to the husband; this also is the sacrificial side of the Law of Love and might be the loving thing to do in a given situation.

       Should the teamwork feel that a particular sexual relationship between Home members is hurting others in the Home, or causing problems, they are free to shepherd and offer counsel in order to help solve the problem or help things to improve.

       If you are going to be away on a trip or visiting another Home for an extended period of time and you foresee situations coming up where you might share with others, couples should pr ay about it together beforehand and come to an agreement.

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       The application of the sexual aspect of the Law of Love is a multi-faceted and sometimes complicated subject. It is therefore important that all voting members thoroughly study the counsel given in the "Living the Lord's Law of Love" series (starting with ML #3201, GN 804, Lifelines 25.). While we've included in this section those aspects of the Law of Love that are actual Charter rules which should be kept at all times, th ere is an abundance of important counsel in that GN series which members should read, study and apply according to their situation.

       As in marriage and all other social relationships with each other, God's laws of love are still the same: 1. Is it good for God's work? 2. Is it good for His Body? 3. Is it good for you? Does it glorify God, His Body and edify your own soul? Does it help someone else to do a better job for the Lord? Do you even need it for your own good? These are questions you will have to answer yourself and before God and others, and you may need counsel in answering them. Any variation from the norm of personal relationships, any substantial change in marital relationships, any projected sexual associations should have the willing consent of all parties concerned or affected. ... If this is lacking in any quarter and anyone is going to be harmed or unduly offended, then your action is not in love or according to God's law of love! "Love doeth thy neighbor no harm," for "thou shall love thy neighbor as thyself": this is God's law of love! "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." ... These are God's conditions. "Greater love hath no man than this: that a man lay down his life for his friends." "Therefore we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren." Are you willing to lay down your life—or even your wife—for a starving brother or a sister? (ML #302C:13,14,15,18.)

C. No sexual activity or open demonstration of sexual affection should tak e place in public areas of the Home.

       In accordance with the Law of Love, we should avoid doing anything that would hurt others. As sexual affection or activities in front of others could cause hurt, it should be avoided in public areas of the Home. You'll find more specifics on the subject in FSM 241, "The Affection Revolution," and ML #2857 in Lifelines 22. Such activities should be carried out in private.

       You have one kind of affection openly amongst all your members—anytime, anywhere— and another kind you reserve for lovemaking with your partner behind closed doors. Your everyday standard of natural, loving affection amongst your Home members during your normal daily interaction with each other is not supposed to signal or lead to sex, which is what you have in your bedroom on your dates behind closed doors (ML #2857:44).

D. For those 18 years of age and over, sex may only occur between consenting partners in accordance with point D of the Offenses Warranting Excommunicati on.

       If a sister or brother does not want to share sexually with someone, they should not be coerced into doing so. If you wish to have a date with someone, and they do not wish to have a date with you, then you should not try to make them feel that they are not being "sacrificial." Perhaps you need to be more sacrificial by forgoing the date with them. Maybe if you pray and ask the Lord to supply someone to fill your needs rather than trying so hard in the arm of the flesh, you might get bette r results.

       Husbands and wives should, as much as possible, consent to having sex when their partner requests it. The Bible says, "Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife unto the husband. The wife hath not power of her own body, but the husband: and likewise also the husband hath not power of his own body, but the wife.       Defraud ye not one the other, except it be with consent for a time, that ye may give yourselves to fasting and prayer; and come togethe r again, that Satan tempt you not for your incontinency." (1 Corinthians 7:3-5).

       You don't have to get anybody's permission as long as it's with mutual consent of the parties involved.—That means with all the parties involved and all of those affected, which could be the whole Home! As long as it's with consent and as long as it's legal! (ML #1829:80.)

E. For teens (16 and 17), sexual activity is permitted only with consenting partners ages 16 through 20.

       It is our belief that our seni or teens will have the maturity to lovingly engage in sexual activity with other consenting senior teens and YAs and that in doing so they will operate in accordance with the Law of Love.

       By permitting you 16- and 17-year-olds to participate in the sexual freedoms granted by the Law of Love, we are opening the door for you to step into a new realm of maturity and adulthood. You will be faced with fully living the Law of Love, with the responsibility of making sure your actions with one another are guided by love and not by lust, that you hurt no one.

       Permitting you to choose whether or not to become involved sexually with your peers is a sobering step for everyone involved, both for you as well as for the adults. As adults, we better understand the potential emotional pitfalls of sharing sexually with one another and the difficulties which can arise, the battles of jealousy, of feeling left out, of unloving actions, etc. We realize that we will need to help you overcome these battl es, that you will need shepherding, understanding and a listening ear. But because we believe that the Lord wants you to grow into spiritually mature Christian adults, we are willing to take on the extra burden of helping you through these lessons. We are permitting you to partake of sexual sharing within the 16-20 year age range with the understanding that you will agree to be shepherded by your parents and other adults, and that you will be open and honest about your questions, tests and trial s.

       These freedoms are sobering for you because you will now be faced with decisions which could have life-changing consequences. Lovemaking can result in newborn children, and resultant children will need to be cared for by mommies and daddies, and these mommies and daddies will be you. So you will need to realize that although you have the freedom and right to engage in sexual activity, you also have to take the responsibility for your actions.

       Another thing to keep in mind: You will notice that in the root clause it says "sexual activity is permitted only with consenting partners ages 16 through 20." It is very important to realize that not everyone in your age group is going to want to engage in sexual activity, that some will want to wait until they are older or until they feel more prepared for it. Others will only want to dabble in it, while yet others will want to partake fully. The choice whether to take this step is a very personal and individual choice based on each perso n's faith. No one should feel pressured one way or the other by anyone. If you are trying to convince someone to have sex with you or to go farther than they want to go, or if you are applying peer pressure in any way, then your actions are unloving and are contrary to the Law of Love.

       There is a great deal of Word on this subject which you are expected to read in order to help you fully grasp the depth of God's Law of Love and how to live in accordance with it.

       We are expecting that you wil l face this new challenge as loving, mature Family members who will use these freedoms in love, the way the Lord and Dad and Mama have always intended them to be practiced.

       See also Word Rules, C. and D. for other requirements that you must fulfill during your 15th year before engaging in sexual activity at age 16.

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1. 16- and 17-year-olds may not engage in sexual intercourse unless they have first counseled with and received permission from their resident parent(s) to do so. This permission is required regardless of whether the young people involved choose to use some form of birth control such as condoms.

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2. Even if permission to have sexual intercourse has been granted by the parent(s) of a 16- or 17-year-old, the teens having sex must still agree together before beginning any sexual activity as to whether they will have sexual intercourse or not. If the teens haven't talked about it ahead of time, then it should be clearly understood by both partners th at they will not have sexual intercourse or any sexual activity that could result in pregnancy.

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Let's explore the following hypothetical situations:

       There is a 16-year-old girl in a Home who has been getting to know several teen boys in her Home. She has even begun having dates with one of them from time to time.

       On the other hand the mother and father of this young woman have serious reservations as to whether or not their daughter is ready to take on the serious responsibilit y which can result should she engage in sexual intercourse with the young man in question. Their daughter has not given much thought to the subject of marriage, nor has the young man who she has grown close to. They simply feel attracted to each other, and like spending time together. Neither the young woman nor the young man in this picture are necessarily prepared and/or prayed up on the subject of having a baby together should they have intercourse.

       Due to the Lord, Dad and Mama's counsel t o the Family that pregnancy should in most cases result in marriage, the parents of this 16 year old girl have a say in who their daughter's mate might be, especially since this is only the first year since she has begun having more serious contact with those of the opposite sex.

       Then there is also the factor that should an unexpected pregnancy occur, a great part of the soon-to-be-mother's care will fall on the parents' shoulders. Therefore their daughter having intercourse is essentially a f amily matter affecting more than just their daughter and the young man whom she is close to. The parents understandably want to have a say in what may be a long term, serious decision affecting all of their lives.

       This policy does not hinder young people from spending time together and even having dates without parental permission, although they should counsel about their relationships with their parents or shepherds as well, as already stated in the Charter. It is simply letting them know tha t they need to ask their resident parent(s) before engaging in full intercourse. This will also cause young people to realize that going beyond this point is potentially taking their relationship into the realm of parenthood.

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F. For junior teens (14 and 15), dating with other teens ages 14 through 17 will be governed by the junior teens' parent(s) or legal guardian(s). However, sexual intercourse or skin to skin touching of genitals is not permitted either by or with those under th e age of 16. Teens 14 and 15 are not permitted to date or have any sexual activity with anyone over the age of 17

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       Dating by teens, ages 14 and 15, with other teens, ages 14 through 17, will be under the authority and responsibility of the 14- or 15-year-olds' parents or legal guardians.

       Those 14 through 17 may date if they wish, providing they have received permission to do so from the junior teens' parent(s) or legal guardian(s). Parents or legal guardians may allow their junio r teens to date and have emotional and physical contact with other teens that the parents deem appropriate, but may not permit their junior teens to engage in sexual intercourse or skin to skin touching of genitals by the dating teens. While those 16 and 17 are permitted to have full sex with those ages 16 through 20, 16- and 17 -year -olds are not permitted to do so with junior teens that they may be dating.

       Those 14 and 15 who break these rules will be subject to disciplinary action, and in jeopardy of being put on Probationary Status or other disciplinary action decided upon by their parents or legal guardians.

       I know that in an earlier talk ... I suggested that 15 years old was the age our teens could start their serious dating. But in light of World conditions, we might be wise to up this requirement—until our teens are each at least 16 years of age (ML #2589:10.)

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G. For those under the age of 14, dating is at the parents' discretion, but only non-sexual affec tion is allowed.

H. If two members were within the proper age range and regularly sharing together sexually and one moves out of the age range of the other, they may request permission from the continental office to continue sharing together. The continental office may grant permission if they feel it is warranted. (See also Offenses Warranting Excommunication, D. 6.)

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       This only applies to two members who were in the same age group and sharing together, but then one has a birthd ay that takes them out of the age range of their partner. For example, if a 17-year-old and a 20-year-old have been having dates, and then the 20-year-old turns 21 but the 17-year-old has not yet turned 18. They could request permission from their CROs to continue sharing together until the younger partner turns 18. The CROs have the authority to grant or deny such permission.

I. Members in the Charter Family less than six months must refrain from all sexual activities, in accordance with the Procedures for Accepting New Disciples, E.

1. If the new or rejoining member is married, and their spouse joins with them, they may have sex with their spouse.

       New members, and members rejoining the Charter Family, must refrain from sex for the first six months they are in the Family.

We're an army, and when babes join they need to go through their initial training and boot camp without the complications of personal relationships. They need time to fall in love with Jesus and the Word f irst, then later when they are stronger they can be trusted with the added blessing of sexual fellowship. If a married couple joins the Family together, then that is not quite so much a distraction; they're already used to each other, they know each other and they're not going to be so distracted (ML #1909:20,18).

J. Members may only engage in sexual activities that are mutually agreed upon by both partners and permitted for their age group. No one should force or in any way coerce a sexual p artner to participate in any sexual activity that they do not desire to engage in.

       As explained earlier, sexual activities are to occur only if both parties are consenting. This clause covers any specific sexual activities which one partner may not feel comfortable engaging in. For example, if a man particularly likes having a woman perform oral sex on him, but she doesn't like it, the man should not try to badger or in any way try to coerce her to do so.

       Simply stated, people should not for ce or try to coerce their sexual partners to do things that they don't want to do. To do so is unloving and unkind.

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1. Sexual intercourse or any sexual activity that could result in pregnancy, except for mated couples with each other, may not occur unless both parties have discussed and agreed to doing so before beginning any sexual activity, as outlined in "Living the Lord's Law of Love, part 4", (ML #3204, GN 807).

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K. Members should apply the counsel on birth contro l as explained in "Go for the Gold," ML #2961, Lifelines 22. (See also, Mama's Memos!—No. 4. A How-to of the Practical Application of "Going for the Gold"! ML #3138. Also see paragraphs 54—114 of "Living the Lord's Law of Love, Part 4," ML #3204, GN 807, Lifelines #25.)

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L. A Charter single man has a minimum responsibility towards any single woman he impregnates, regardless of the circumstances that brought about the pregnancy.

1. The father of the child must form a parenting t eamwork and live in the same Home with the mother to help care for her and the baby throughout the pregnancy and for the first year of the child's life, unless the mother releases the father of this responsibility earlier.

a) When a man forms a parenting teamwork with a single woman who has other children, the man is to be a father figure to all the children, not just to his one flesh child.

b) When a single woman forms a parenting teamwork with a single man who has other children, she als o is responsible to help with the care of his children.

c) This 20-month minimum responsibility applies to all pregnancies that occur after November 1, 1998, even if unexpected.

       The Lord says in "Living the Lord's Law of Love—part 6," ML #3206, GN 809, that when a child results from the lovemaking of two single people, in most cases it is His will that the mother and father marry. However, after having sought and heard from the Lord in prophecy and having received confirming prophecies fro m others, they are not sure that they should marry, or feel that it is not the Lord's will to marry, the man will be responsible to fulfill a minimum 20-month responsibility to the mother and child. The man will be responsible to help care for the mother physically, emotionally and spiritually throughout her entire pregnancy, and then help to care for her and the baby until it is one year old, unless she releases the father of this responsibility.

       If the couple are not sure of the Lord's will regarding marriage at the time that they form their parenting teamwork, they do not have to make a firm decision to either to marry or not to marry. As they work together and care for the child together they might grow in love for each other and the child, and with time feel more comfortable with the idea of marriage, in which case they are free to marry in accordance with the Marriage Rules.

       When they complete the minimum responsibility period, if they have not yet received a clear answer fro m the Lord regarding marriage it's recommended that they hear from the Lord again, to see how He is leading. Whether they should part, having completed their minimum requirement, or whether they should marry, having grown in love and faith.

       Parenting teamworks are not required to be romantic or sexual in nature. They can be one of friendship as they parent the child together. If both parties are in agreement to continuing a sexual relationship, that is fine, but it is to be a free choice that they should make together.

       The parenting teamwork must be formed if pregnancy results even if the man and woman didn't intend to have intercourse but they did, or they chose to use a condom and it broke or came off, etc.

2. A single woman may, if she chooses, release the man from his "minimum responsibility" for the following reasons only:

a) If either the man or the woman feel led to a particular ministry and it is not convenient for them to participate in that ministry together.

       This ministry need not be a specialized ministry; it can be a ministry that either the man or woman is led to participate in due to their talents and gifts. If there are extenuating circumstances that make it difficult for them to be together and pursue this ministry, then the single woman can release the man from his responsibility in order for him or her to pursue that ministry or opportunity of service in the Family.

b) If either the man or the woman chooses to leave a rich westernized field t o go to a poor, non-westernized or non-Christian mission field.

       For the purpose of this clause, the rich westernized fields are the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Western Europe.

c) If the man and woman presently live in different Homes and neither Home votes to accept the other person as a new Home member, and they can't find another Home to take them in, and don't feel it's God's will to open their own Home.

d) If the Home the man and woman live in closes and they ca nnot find a Home that will vote to receive them both and the child (or children), and they do not feel it is God's will to open their own Home together.

e) If the man has to leave the country for legal or visa purposes and cannot return.

       In this case, however, the woman retains the right to travel with the man to his new country so that he can continue to fulfill his minimum responsibility, providing she receives clearance and a Home votes her in.

f) If, after they are a parenting teamwo rk, the woman decides to move to another Home and the man wishes to remain in their current Home.

g) If both the man and the woman feel it is not God's will to form a parenting teamwork.

       Since the decision to release the man from his responsibility affects the Home, the single woman should counsel with her Home in making this decision, to be sure that she and the other Home members will be able to properly care for her baby and other Home responsibilities without the father's help.

3. Th e single man is automatically released from his minimum responsibility under the following circumstances:

a) If the man gets voted out of the Home and the woman prefers to stay in her Home.

b) If the woman is voted out of the Home and the man chooses to remain in the Home.

c) If either the man or the woman was to change from Charter Member status to Fellow Member status.

d) If the woman were to get pregnant with another man's baby, or were to become engaged to another man.

e) If t he woman must leave the country due to legal or visa purposes and cannot return, and the man chooses not to go with her.

4. If a woman decides to release a man from his minimum responsibility, she should hear from the Lord in prophecy, and it's recommended she seek confirming prophecies from her elders as well.

a) All releases from the minimum responsibility are unconditional and cannot be overturned.

       The woman cannot change her mind later and then hold the man responsible. If the man wh o was released later chooses of his own accord to fulfill what remains of the minimum 20-month responsibility, that is fine, but the woman cannot demand it.

b) Releases from the minimum responsibility must be recorded in writing, in accordance with Minimum Responsibility Release Form. The single woman must sign the form, along with at least one Home officer as a witness. The man and single woman should each have a copy of the signed release form.

c) The Home cannot prevent a woman from rel easing the father of her child from his 20-month minimum responsibility.

       It is strongly recommended that the woman counsel and pray together with her shepherds and Home to make sure she is able to care for her baby and her other Home responsibilities, or that she has sufficient help, support and the blessing of her Home before she decides to release the father of her child from his parenting teamwork responsibilities.

5. If not presently living in the same Home as the single woman, the man must either join her Home, or she must join his. If neither Home will vote them in as per the Right of Mobility, D., then the man is responsible to find another Home to accept them or open a new Home to care for the woman and child.

a) Because the single man is to do all he can to fulfill his minimum responsibility to a single mother, his vote will automatically be counted as a yes vote when his Home votes on whether to receive the single woman the man has impregnated into their Home.

       The m an and the pregnant woman must live in the same Home during the 20 months. If that necessitates one of them moving, they must be voted into the Home according to Rights of the Charter Home, E. If neither Home votes to receive them, then the single man is responsible to find another Home to take them in, or open a new Home to care for the woman and child, unless the single woman chooses to release the man from his responsibility.

       If a Home refuses to receive someone who seeks to form a parentin g teamwork with one of the Home members in order to fulfill their minimum requirement, it is highly recommended that the Home seek the Lord in prophecy for a confirmation of their decision, because the Lord may want the Home to receive these new people even if it goes contrary to their initial reaction or desires.

       If the man and woman cannot find a Home to take them both in, and feel that it is not the Lord's will for them to open their own Home together, the woman may, after receiving a confi rmation in prophecy, release the man from his minimum responsibility.

b) In the event that the man and woman are under 18, if neither of their Homes votes to receive them and they cannot find another Home to take them in, then the man is automatically released from his minimum responsibility, because under the Charter two people under 18 cannot open their own Home.

6. Both the man and woman may move to another Home or country during their parenting teamwork period, provided they remain tog ether until the child has turned one year old.

7. If a Home votes out a man who is fulfilling his 20-month minimum responsibility to a woman in the Home, the woman can choose to leave with the man, or she can release the man from this responsibility and stay in her Home.

8. If a woman who forms part of a parenting teamwork is voted out of the Home, the man is not required to go with her. He can if he chooses to. If he chooses to stay in his Home, he is automatically released from his minim um 20-month responsibility.

9. If a man who is involved in a parenting teamwork has legal or visa problems and is forced to leave the country in which he lives, the following are the options open to the parenting teamwork:

a) If he can leave to take care of his business and then return to fulfill the rest of his 20-month minimum responsibility, he must do this.

b) The woman can leave the country with him, or join him later wherever he has gone.

c) She can release him from what remain s of his minimum responsibility.

10. If the woman must leave the country she is in due to visa or legal problems, following are the options open to the parenting teamwork:

a) The ideal is for the woman to return after taking care of her visa or legal business, to complete the 20-month period of the parenting teamwork.

b) If she chooses not to return to her former country, the man can travel with her or join her on her new field if he chooses. However, the man is not obligated to do so. If he chooses not to go with her, he is automatically released from his minimum responsibility.

       The woman should take special care to be sure of the Lord's will for her to move to another field. If the woman leaves the country and cannot return, then the man is also released from his responsibility unless he chooses to join the woman on her new field.

11. After a man and woman are an established parenting teamwork in a Home, if the woman wants to move to another Home and the man doesn't, he is not obligated to move. She can either release the man from his minimum responsibility and move, or she can choose to stay in the same Home and thus continue to benefit from his help.

12. If the Home where the parenting teamwork resides closes, the man and the woman must find a new Home to take them in together, until they have completed their minimum requirement, or else open their own Home.

a) If the man and woman cannot find a Home to take them in, and feel that it is not the Lord's will for them to open their own Home together, the woman may, after receiving a confirmation in prophecy, release the man from his minimum responsibility.

13. If a man knows he will be traveling soon and has written for clearance, he should inform the woman of his plans before having sexual activity that could result in pregnancy. If the woman becomes pregnant, the man and the woman are responsible to first pray about marriage. If they do not want to get married or they're not sure, then he c an still leave as he had planned.

a) If she chooses, the woman has the right to join him on his new field to form a parenting teamwork, provided she receives clearance and is voted in to his new Home, or they find another Home to take them in, or they open their own Home. If she chooses not to join him he is automatically released from the minimum responsibility

14. If a man plans to travel but he did not tell the woman about his travel plans and that he had written for clearance to anothe r country at the time when they were deciding whether to engage in sexual activity that could result in pregnancy, then he is obligated to fulfill his minimum responsibility regardless of his travel plans or the fact that he has written for clearance. If he has not yet left the country when the woman finds out she's pregnant, then there are two options:

a) If he is in a westernized country and is moving to a non-westernized country, the woman can release him from his minimum responsibility if she feels led.

       For the purpose of this clause, "Westernized countries" are the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and all West European countries.

b) If he is in a non-westernized country already, then he is required to stay with the woman for the 20-month minimum responsibility, unless she chooses to go with him or release him from his responsibility for one of the other reasons in clause L. 2.

15. If the man had already moved to another country before the woman found out sh e was pregnant, he is not obligated to return provided he had informed the woman of his plans to travel and that he had written for clearance before they had intercourse.

a) The woman has the right to join him in his new location if she wants him to meet the 20-month minimum requirement, provided she receives clearance to his new Home, or they find another Home to take them in, or they open their own Home. If she chooses not to join him he is automatically released from the minimum responsibi lity.

b) If the man had not informed the woman of his plans to travel and that he had written for clearance prior to their decision to have intercourse, unless the woman releases him, he must return to his previous country to fulfill his minimum responsibility.

16. If at the time that the man and woman make the decision to engage in sexual activity which could result in pregnancy, the woman informs the man that she has written for clearance and plans to travel to another country, if the wo man becomes pregnant, the man must do all he can to accompany her to the field or join her there to fulfill the minimum 20-month responsibility.

17. If the woman fails to inform the man of her travel plans and that she has written for clearance to another country when they decide to engage in sexual activity which could result in pregnancy, and she becomes pregnant, the man is not obligated to travel with her. But if she remains in the same country, the man is obligated to full the minimum re sponsibility.

a) If the woman is in another country when she finds out she's pregnant, the man is not required to join her. But if she returns to the former country, he is required to fulfill the minimum 20-month responsibility.

       Should the woman release the man from his minimum responsibility because either he or she are moving to another country, and later he or she returns to the same country, the man is not required to complete his minimum responsibility. However, the loving and responsi ble thing for him to do would be to fulfill what remains of his minimum responsibility to the woman and child, if that is what the woman desires, but it is not required.

18. The woman is not obligated to receive the man's help. She has the last say as to whether they will form a parenting teamwork or whether she will release the man from his 20-month minimum responsibility.

       If the woman decides to release the man from the minimum responsibility for reasons other than those listed in point L .2., she will be held accountable before the Lord for her decision, so she should not base her decision only on feelings. She should have prophecies to back up her decision, and it's recommended that she also seek confirming prophecies.

19. When the woman does not know who the father of her child is, she cannot hold any of the potential candidates to the 20-month minimum responsibility.

       Although they will not be held to the minimum responsibility, all those who might be the father can share in the care of the woman during her pregnancy as much as they can.

a) Should it become known during the first year after the birth of the child who the father is, and both the man and the woman are agreed on the matter, then the best solution is that they marry. If they choose not to marry or aren't sure, the man must fulfill what remains of the 20-month minimum responsibility, unless the woman releases him.

b) If a man is not sure if he's the father of a child, and he becomes involved wi th or marries another woman in the meantime, if he and the woman he created a child with come to an agreement later that he is the father of the child, he will be held responsible for fulfilling the minimum responsibility, if the woman who bore his child so desires.

       It's highly recommended that if a man knows there's a possibility that he might have fathered a child with someone else, he should make this known to any woman he becomes seriously involved with in the future, until such time as he knows that he is not the father of the child, or until he has fulfilled the minimum responsibility, or until the mother of the child has released him from his responsibility.

20. If a man impregnates more than one woman he is responsible to fulfill the minimum 20-month responsibility with them all, unless one or more of the women feels led to release him of the responsibility.

       When a man has impregnated more than one woman, he is required to pray about the relationship he will have with ea ch one. First he should pray about the option of marriage to see how the Lord would lead him in that respect. It could be that the Lord would lead him to marry one of the women or that they would enter into a threesome relationship. There is also the possibility that the Lord would lead the man to marry one of the women and assume the 20-month minimum responsibility with the other. Or there is the possibility that the Lord would lead the man to assume the 20-month minimum responsibility with bot h women—and in both the previous cases—of course, they would have to make arrangements to all live in the same Home.

21. A man who has either been released from forming a parenting teamwork with the mother of his child or who completes the designated minimum 20-month responsibility can support the woman financially or with goods, if he chooses, but it's not required. He should at least support her spiritually, with love, encouragement, and prayer.

22. If a man refuses to fulfill his mini mum responsibility when he has fathered a child, the continental office will decide whether he will be fully or partially excommunicated.

       For a fuller explanation of the "minimum responsibility" when a single woman gets pregnant, please read "Living the Lord's Law of Love, Part 6" (ML #3206, GN 809/Lifelines 25).

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M. A Charter married couple has a minimum responsibility towards any single woman the man impregnates, regardless of the circumstances that brought about the pregnancy.

1. They must form a parenting teamwork with the single woman, and live in the same Home together. The man and his wife will help care for the single woman physically, emotionally and spiritually throughout her pregnancy, as well as help care for her and the baby for the first year of the child's life, unless the single woman releases the couple of their responsibility earlier.

a) When a couple forms a parenting teamwork with a single woman who has other children, the man is to be a father figure to all the children, not just to his one flesh child.

b) When a single woman forms a parenting teamwork with a married couple who has other children, she also is responsible to help them with the care of their children.

c) The 20-month minimum responsibility applies to all pregnancies that occur after November 1, 1998, even if unexpected.

       When a married man and a single woman create a child, the Lord does not emphasize marriage (which would mean a threesome). However, a parenting teamwork must be formed if pregnancy results even if the man and woman didn't intend to have intercourse but they did, or they chose to use a condom and it broke or came off, etc.

       The relationship the married man and single woman share as a parenting teamwork can be one of friendship, as the couple and single mother parent the child or children together. It need not be a romantic or sexual relationship between the man and single woman. If the husband and wife are in agreement with the man and single woman continuing a sexual relationship, that is fine, if the single woman wants to. The husband cannot continue to have a sexual relationship with the single woman without the consent of his wife.

2. A single woman may, if she chooses, release the married couple from their minimum responsibility for the following reasons:

a) If either the couple or the woman feel led to a particular ministry and it is not convenient for them to participate in that ministry together.

       This ministry need not be a specialized ministry; it can be a ministry that either the couple or woman is led to participate in due to their talents and gifts. If there are extenuating circumstances that make it difficult for them to be together and pursue this ministry, then the single woman can release the couple from their responsibility in order for herself or them to pursue that ministry or opportunity of service in the Family.

b) If either the couple or the single woman chooses to leave a rich wester nized field to go to a poor non-westernized or non-Christian mission field.

       For the purpose of this clause, the rich westernized fields are the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Western Europe.

c) If a couple without children and a single woman live in different Homes when they find out the single woman is pregnant, and neither Home votes to receive the other person as a new member, and they can't find another Home to take them in, and they don't feel it's the Lord's will to open their own Home.

       It is a serious decision for a Home to decline to receive such new personnel. It is recommended that a Home hear from the Lord regarding all requests from Family members to join their Home. But in the case of the possible formation of a parenting teamwork, if a Home feels inclined to not receive the couple or woman, it is especially important that they hear from the Lord to get a confirmation. The Lord may want the Home to receive these new members even though it seems co ntrary to the initial reaction or preference of the Home council.

d) If the couple gets voted out of the Home and the single woman prefers to stay in her Home.

e) If the Home that the couple and single woman live in closes, and they cannot find a Home that will vote to receive them both and the child (or children), and they do not feel it is the Lord's will to open their own Home together.

f) If both the couple and the woman feel it is not the Lord's will to form a parenting teamwork.

       In this case it is advisable to not only have personal prophecies that confirm this decision, but also to ask for confirming prophecies from their shepherds or parents (in the case of senior teens or YAs).

g) If the single woman is already in a good "One Wife" Home situation where her needs are being sufficiently met.

3. Reasons in which the extenuating circumstances make it such that the single woman would be required to either release the couple or choose to move with them (in which cas e she must receive clearance and be voted in to her new Home).

a) If the couple has children and are moving from a rich westernized field to a poor non-westernized mission field.

b) If the couple has children and they wish to move to a different Home or another country that would provide a significantly better situation for their children.

       In either of the above two cases, the single woman must allow them to move, but she has the right to go with them if she wishes. She must, of course, receive clearance and be voted in to the new Home.

c) If either the couple or the single woman changes from Charter Member status to Fellow Member status.

d) If the single woman were to get pregnant with another man's baby, or were to become engaged to another man.

e) If, after they are a parenting teamwork, the single woman chooses to move to another Home, and the couple wishes to remain in their present Home.

f) If the couple has children and they and the single woman presently liv e in different Homes and the Home that the married couple lives in does not vote to accept the single woman as a new Home member.

       In such a case, it is recommended that the Home where the couple lives hear from the Lord in prophecy for a clear confirmation as to His will, and the reasons why He wishes them to accept or not to accept the woman into their Home. The couple (with children) can choose to move to the single woman's Home, if they get voted in, or open their own Home, if they feel led , but it's not required. If the couple's present Home does not vote to receive the single woman and the couple does not feel led to move to the single woman's Home nor open their own Home, then they are released from their responsibility.

g) If the couple has to leave the country for legal or visa purposes and cannot return, either due to visa or legal reasons, or they choose not to return due to circumstances such as lack of finances or visa limitations.

(1) The single woman has the right to join the couple in their new location if she so desires, and if she receives clearance and is accepted by their new Home's vote.

h) If the single woman leaves the country and cannot return or chooses not to return.

       The couple may join her on her new field if they desire, but they are not required to do so.

i) The single woman is voted out of the Home, and the couple chooses not to go with her.

4. All releases from the minimum responsibility are unconditional and cannot be overturn ed.

       The single woman cannot change her mind later and then hold the couple responsible. If the couple who was released later chooses of their own accord to fulfill what remains of the 20-month minimum responsibility, they may do so; but the single woman cannot demand it.

       If a woman decides to release a couple from their minimum responsibility she should hear from the Lord in prophecy, and it's recommended she seek confirming prophecies from her elders as well.

5. Releases from the minimum responsibility must be recorded in writing, using the Minimum Responsibility Release Form. The single woman is to sign the form, along with at least one Home officer as a witness. The couple and single woman should each keep a copy of the signed release form.

6. The Home cannot prevent a woman from releasing the couple from their 20-month minimum responsibility.

       It is strongly recommended, however, that the woman counsels and prays together with her shepherds and Home to make sure she is a ble to care for her baby and her other Home responsibilities, or that she has sufficient help, support and the blessing of her Home, before she decides to release the couple from their parenting teamwork responsibilities.

7. To form a parenting teamwork, the married couple and single woman must live in the same Home during the 20 months. If that necessitates either the single woman moving to the Home of the married couple, or the married couple being received into the Home of a single woman, they must be voted into the Home according to Rights of the Charter Home, E.

a) If the Home of the couple with children votes not to receive the single woman, and if after prayer, the married couple feels that having to pull up stakes and move to a new Home would be a detriment to their family and their children who are already fruitful and well established where they are, then the couple is released from their responsibility.

(1) Because married couples are to do all they can to fulfill t heir minimum responsibility to a single mother, their vote will automatically be counted as a yes vote when their Home votes on whether to receive the single woman the man has impregnated into their Home.

       When a parenting teamwork involves a married couple with children and a single woman, the needs of all parties involved, the couple and their children as well as the single mother and her child/children, must be taken into consideration.

       If a Home chooses not to receive a single woman who s eeks to form a parenting teamwork with a married couple who is in their Home, it is highly recommended that that Home seek the Lord in prophecy for a confirmation of their decision, because the Lord may want the Home to receive this single woman even if it goes contrary to their initial reaction or desires.

       The option also remains for the couple and their children to move to the Home of the single woman, if they wish and if that Home votes to receive them as new members; or they can find anoth er Home that will receive their parenting teamwork, or open a new Home. But this is not required when the couple has children. The ideal when the couple has children is that the single woman joins the Home where the couple lives, if she doesn't already live there.

b) In the event that the couple and single woman are under 18, if neither of their Homes votes to receive them and they cannot find another Home to take them in, then the couple is automatically released from their minimum responsib ility

8. Both the couple and single woman may move to another Home or country during their parenting teamwork period, provided they remain together until the child has turned one year old.

9. If a Home votes out a couple who is fulfilling their 20-month minimum responsibility to a single woman in the Home, the single woman can choose to leave with the couple, or she can release them from their responsibility.

10. If the single woman is voted out of the Home, the couple is not required t o go with her. They can if they choose to. If they choose to stay in their Home they are automatically released from their 20-month minimum responsibility.

11. If a married man who is involved in a parenting teamwork has legal or visa problems and must leave the country in which he lives, the following are the options open to the parenting teamwork:

a) If he can leave to take care of his business and then return to care for his wife, family and the single mother and her child/children, he must do this.

b) If it is necessary that the man and his wife and family leave the country due to legal or visa problems, they are not required to return to care for the single mother, but the single woman has the right to join them on their new field for the remainder of the 20 months.

       Again, the needs of the parenting teamwork as a whole must be considered. In this case, however, the single woman has the right to join the couple in their new location if she so desires, and if she receives clearance and is accepted by their new Home's vote. But if this does not work out then the couple would be released from the remainder of their responsibility.

12. If the single woman must leave her field due to visa or legal problems, following are the options open to the parenting teamwork:

a) The ideal situation is for the single woman to return after taking care of her visa or legal business to complete her 20-month parenting teamwork, in which case the married couple is obligated to resume the parenting teamwork.

b) If the single woman cannot return or chooses to remain on her new field, then the married couple is released from their responsibility, unless they choose to join her.

       The single woman should take special care to be sure of the Lord's will for her to move to another field. If the single woman leaves the country and cannot return, then the couple is also released from their responsibility unless they choose to join her on her new field.

13. After a coupl e and single woman are an established parenting teamwork in a Home, if the single woman wants to move to another Home the couple is not obligated to move with her. In such a case, they are released from their minimum responsibility.

       The couple can of course choose to move with the single mom to another Home or country, if they feel led.

14. If a married couple and a single woman are a parenting teamwork and their Home closes, they need to find a Home that will vote to receive them, or they should open their own Home. If they feel it is not the Lord's will for them to open a Home together, the woman may choose to release the couple from their minimum responsibility.

       Parenting teamworks are to make it easier for the pregnant woman or single mother, especially in dire conditions or circumstances of great need. If the Home of a parenting teamwork closes the couple cannot move into a Home without the single woman unless they can also find a Home for the her which she is happy to move into, and thus she agrees to release the couple. This counsel is for all couples, regardless of whether or not they have children. The couple must care for the single woman and her children as well as their own as best they can.

       The best thing is for the couple and single woman to find a Home that is willing to receive them all, or for them to open a new Home so they can continue their 20-month minimum responsibility. They do, however, also have the option of finding a Home that will vote to receive the single woman—in which case, if she chooses to move into that Home, she can release the couple. That would be acceptable, but only if they find another Home for the single woman can the couple move into another Home that has accepted them without the single woman.

       It is acceptable when stop gap measures are necessary for the couple and single woman to temporarily live in separate Homes until a new Home is found that will receive the whole parenting teamwork, or they're able to open their own Home, or the single woman released the couple. But this must be temporary and the parties involved must be actively looking for accommodations where they can be together to fulfill their parenting responsibilities together. If it is determined that the couple is not working to unite with and care for the single mother, they will be in jeopardy of excommunication.

15. If the couple has no children and they wish to leave a westernized field to go to a non-westernized field, the singl e woman has the right to go with them if she receives clearance, or she can choose to release them. She is not obligated to release them, and if she doesn't, they must remain to fulfill the 20-month minimum responsibility. If she releases them so they can travel, she can choose to be a parenting teamwork with them until they leave.

a) For the purpose of this clause, the "westernized countries" are the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and all West European countries.

16. If a c ouple has children and they wish to leave a westernized field to go to a non-westernized field, the single woman can go with them, or she can stay with them as a parenting teamwork until they travel. But she cannot keep them from moving from a westernized field to a non-westernized field.

       If the couple's right to travel was due to their desire to take the children out of a westernized field the single woman is obligated to allow them to travel, and thus release them from their minimum responsi bility, so they can move their children to higher ground.

a) If the single woman later travels to the field where the couple is living, the couple must fulfill what remains of the 20-month minimum responsibility.

       If a single woman plans to travel to a field to form a parenting teamwork with a couple on that field, she would need to go through the standard procedure to have a Home on that field accept her, as well as request clearance from the CRO. If she does not receive clearance, then she and the couple may apply for clearance to a different country, if they so desire. Or the couple has the option of returning to the field where she is. But if she is denied clearance and the couple is not led to change fields or return to the field where she is, the couple is automatically released from their minimum responsibility.

17. If a couple with children has formed a parenting teamwork with a single woman and the couple wishes to move on to another Home or field, either westernized or n on-westernized, that would provide a significantly better situation for their children, the single mother must allow them to travel.

a) The single woman has the right to accompany the couple to their new field to form a parenting teamwork, provided she gets clearance to their new Home, or the couple feels led to find another Home to take them in, or they open their own Home. If she does not join them, they are released from their minimum responsibility.

18. If a married couple with no chil dren is planning to move to another country, they can only move if they had informed the pregnant single woman of their plans to travel and that they had written for clearance at the time that the man and the single woman decided what sexual activities they would engage in on their date, unless the woman releases them.

a) If the couple moves, the single woman has the right to join the couple on their new field to form a parenting teamwork, provided she gets clearance to their new Home, or the couple feels led to find another Home to take them in, or they open their own Home.

19. If a couple failed to tell the single woman of their plans to travel and that they had written for clearance when the man and the single woman were deciding what to do on their date and the couple are already on their new field when they learn that the woman is pregnant, it is not required that they return to their former field. But the couple still must fulfill what remains of the minimum responsibility if the woman desires to join them on their field.

20. If a woman releases the couple from their responsibility so that she can travel from one field to another field and then later she returns to her former field where the couple live, the couple is not obligated to join together with her to fulfill what remains of the 20-month minimum responsibility.

       The couple and single woman can contact each other and pray about what they want to do now that they're both on the same field again, but the woman cannot hold the couple responsible. It must be by the couple's choice.

21. If a single woman becomes pregnant from a married man, whether or not she had informed him at the time of their date that she'd written for clearance and planned to travel to another country, the couple will not be required to accompany her to her field.

       If a single woman who is planning to go to the mission field consents to having intercourse with a married man, she does so with the knowledge that if she get s pregnant and still wishes to move to her new field, she will have to forfeit her right to the parenting teamwork unless the couple chooses to go with her. The needs and considerations of all must be taken into account. The married man has obligations to his family, and moving his entire family to a new field may not be expedient.

a) The single woman can decide to postpone her move and join the couple for the 20-month minimum time period, in which case the couple is obligated to fulfill thei r minimum responsibility. Or she can move on to her new field, which automatically releases the couple from their responsibility if they choose not to accompany her.

22. Whether or not a single woman informed a couple (or the man) of her travel plans and that she had written for clearance before they decide what to do on their date, if she is on her new field when she finds out she's pregnant, the couple is not required to join her.

a) If she returns to her former field however, the couple is required to fulfill the 20-month minimum responsibility.

23. In situations where the married couple is traveling to a new Home or field and the single woman chooses to go with them, the three adults should work together to raise the funds needed for all the members of the parenting teamwork to travel.

24. The woman is not obligated to receive the couple's help. She has the last say as to whether they will form a parenting teamwork or whether she will release the couple from their 20-mo nth minimum responsibility

       She will be held accountable before the Lord for her decision, so she should not base her decision only on feelings but have prophecies to back up her decision. It's recommended that she also seek confirming prophecies.

25. When the woman does not know who the father of her child is, she cannot hold any of the potential candidates to the 20-month minimum responsibility.

a) Should it become known during the first year after the birth of the child who the father is, and the couple and the woman are agreed on the matter, then the couple must fulfill what remains of their minimum responsibility if the single woman so desires.

       It's highly recommended that if a married man knows there's a possibility that he might have fathered a child with a single woman, he should make this known to any other single woman he becomes involved with in the future, until such time as he knows that he is not the father of the child, or until he has fulfilled the minimum resp onsibility, or until the mother of the child has released him from his responsibility.

26. If a married man impregnates more than one single woman, he and his wife are responsible to fulfill the 20-month minimum responsibility with each of them, unless one or more feels led to release them from their responsibility.

       In cases where a married man and single woman feel led to engage in any form of sex (in agreement with the wife) where there is a possibility of pregnancy resulting, it is wise for them to ask their partner what arrangements he or she has with other sharing partners. They should also offer the information as to whether they are having sex with anyone else that could result in pregnancy, such as putting the penis in and pulling out before ejaculation, having intercourse with a condom, masturbating the woman's vaginal area with the penis, etc. The time to communicate on these matters is when the couple and single woman are deciding what the husband & single woman will do on their date.

       A couple who either has been released from a parenting teamwork or who has completed the designated 20-month minimum responsibility can support the single woman and her child/children financially or with goods, if they choose to do so, but it's not required. They should at least support spiritually, with love, encouragement, support and prayer.

27. If a married man is a potential candidate to be the father of the single woman's baby, if they're not sure, the couple can leave the Home. If it is later agreed upon by the couple and the single woman that the husband is the father of the child, the couple does not have to return to their former Home or field to care for the single woman.

a) The single woman has the right, however, to join the couple in their new Home to form a parenting teamwork, if she gets voted in to the Home and receives clearance, if it is a different country.

28. If a couple refuses to fulfill their minimum responsibility when the man has fa thered a child, the continental office will decide whether they will be fully or partially excommunicated.

       For a fuller explanation of the "minimum responsibility" when a single woman gets pregnant to a married man, please read "Living the Lord's Law of Love, Part 7" (ML #3206) (GN 809) (Lifelines 25).

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N. Members may not engage in sexual perversions or any other unclean or unloving sexual activity that is physically, mentally, emotionally or spiritually harmful or dangerous, such as: anal intercourse, etc.

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       Family members may not engage in sexual perversions such as sadomasochism, bestiality, anal intercourse, etc.

       Watch out for sexual perversions; they are unhealthy and unscriptural (ML #123:28).

       There are some kinds of sex that are filthy; not all sex is clean, not all sex is good. It depends on who you're having sex with and what your motivation and attitude of mind and heart are, whether it's in love, especially God's Love (ML #2213:47).

O. Me mbers must not knowingly pass on any sexual afflictions. They must inform partners of their afflictions and take necessary precautions and/or abstain, to avoid passing on afflictions to others.

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1. Anyone who has had herpes, either HSV1 (fever blisters or cold sores) or HSV2 (genital herpes) must inform their partner, prior to sharing, that they have had herpes.

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2. Herpes-free people may choose not to use a condom while having intercourse with a partner who has had gen ital herpes. If the herpes-free person wishes to have sex with another herpes-free person within two months after this, they must inform their new partner of the unprotected sex with a previous partner who has had herpes.

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3. Mated members should agree together before one of them engages in sexual activity with a partner who has had herpes, either genital herpes, or fever blisters or cold sores.

       The Law of Love dictates that we should not hurt others. Passing on a sexual afflictio n would be hurting others and should therefore be avoided. Anyone with a sexual affliction should take appropriate sanitary measures to avoid passing on their affliction to others. They should also inform their sexual partners about their affliction. Fever blisters and cold sores (HSV1) are blisters that appear on or near the lips that become crusty and develop scabs. These herpes blisters are different from canker sores, which are usually inside the mouth, and other sores or discoloration on th e lips that are not herpes related.

       I don't think we need to leave it up to the Lord as to whether we catch VD or not! A lot of that depends on us and our sanitary measures and keeping ourselves clean and free of contacts which can possibly incur contamination (ML #1434:20).

       If two partners are sharing and one has had a herpes outbreak and the other hasn't, they may, if they choose, use a condom as a means of protection.

       If you have been completely healed of herpes—that is, you haven't had an outbreak of herpes in a number of years—it is still required that you inform your partner that you have previously had herpes; and it is still the prerogative of the other person to ask that you use a condom while sharing.

       (Question: About Family members with herpes: Should they share with others?) Answer: It is extremely contagious and virulent when active!—As evidenced by sores, blisters and itching on genitals or mouth. However, when dormant and no symptoms are evident, it does not normally seem contagious. Matthew 9:29. (ML #1254:5.)

       I've never forbidden condoms for sanitary purposes! (ML #1458:20.)

P. Members must refrain from viewing pornographic movies, or videos, reading pornographic magazines and books or the use of phone-sex services. Pornographic movies, videos, books and magazines are those in which the sexual organs are the main characters and/or those whose sole purpose is to sexually arouse the viewer or reader.

       God deliver us from those vicious sexua l vices! You shouldn't tolerate them!... King David himself said, "I will set no unclean thing before mine eyes!" (Psalm 101:3)—and that's a very good rule for all of us when it comes to movies, pictures or sex! If it's unloving, it's ungodly! I think that's a very good criterion to us: God is Love, and if it's not pictures of loving, gentle, affectionate, good, kind, clean sex, then it's certainly bad fare. "Come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclea n thing!" (2Corinthians 6:17.) "Have no fellowship with the works of darkness!" (Ephesians 5:11), etc. God help you! (ML #935:33,10,36).

Q. Female homosexual relationships are not permitted.

       You will notice that this is worded differently from the male homosexual rule in the Offenses Warranting Excommunication section. The Bible specifically prohibits male-with-male sexual activity, but there are no passages forbidding such activity between women. This rule is meant to reflect that differen ce, as we do not entirely prohibit all female-with-female sexual activity, unlike the rule regarding males.

       As Dad said, it's fairly natural for some females to be affectionate and loving towards each other. It would therefore be acceptable for two sisters to hold hands or be arm in arm, or have their arms around each other, kiss, caress or hug each other closely, even sexually. Whereas any sexual overtures between two men is prohibited. Of course, such female-with-female cuddling would need t o be conducted in the non-public areas of the Home, just as any other sexual affection would.

       Although such affection between women would be permitted, an actual lesbian relationship, in which the two partners were deeply involved to the exclusion of others, is prohibited. The definition of homosexual is, "Relating to, or having a sexual orientation to persons of the same sex." And as Dad has said, it is not natural for women to only desire sex with other women; such female homosexual relation ships would not be considered as natural, and as such are not permitted.

       Although many may consider affection between women distasteful, we must remember that love is what should guide us. We must be understanding of the needs of others, so if two women have the need for affection between themselves, since it is not Biblically forbidden, we should be loving and mature enough to understand.

       Any such female-with-female activity must be with mutual consent, and no one should be coerced or fee l pressured into participating. This is not a license for those who feel the need for such affection to try to actively search for those who will participate. Only if there is a mutual desire and agreement between two women may they be affectionate with one another.

       When a girl has never had any normal desire for a man, I begin to wonder if it's a spiritual thing. It is certainly not normal or natural as God intended, therefore such lesbianism is a perversion (ML #292:5).

       But two [women] can be very close friends without having to necessarily express it that way, although why not? (ML #292:61.)

       Where it is real love and affection of any two people for each other, that's a different story. But this carnal ... lust of the flesh, ... totally only for women, that's not of the Lord (ML #1748:17).

54. ELECTION RULES

Definition of Terms:

       Voting Members: Members of the Home who have reached the age of 16, and who have been in the Family for at least six months.

       Simple Majority: A vote in which the will of over 50% of the voting members determines the outcome of the vote

       Two-thirds Majority: A vote in which 67% (two out of three voting members) must give an affirmative vote for a measure to pass.

A. General Voting Rules.

1. Unless specified otherwise in the "Charter of Resp onsibilities and Rights" or in the Election Rules, a simple majority determines the outcome of the matter being voted on.

       If you cannot get a unanimous vote, a simple majority will have to do rather than hold up the wheels of progress! (ML #663:vii-1.)

2. A two-thirds majority is required to determine the outcome on any financial matter being voted on. Only voting members 18 and over may vote on financial matters.

       No major [financial] decisions or purchases, etc., shall be made ... wi thout at least a two-thirds consent of the local Colony Council (ML #329B:44).

3. Unless specified otherwise in the Election Rules, a Home must determine its own method of balloting. Since Homes must vote on a variety of matters, they should find a practical and efficient method of balloting.

       There are some voting procedures that require the use of a secret ballot, and in such cases the Home must use a secret ballot as the method of voting. Most of the votes that will be conducted by the Ho mes will not require secret balloting, and therefore each Home may decide what method of voting it will use. Such methods could include a discussion and simple show of hands, or checking off a chart left on the Home's bulletin board, etc. There may be many different options, and the Home must decide by a simple majority which option to use.

4. If a voting member abstains from voting on a matter, a Home's voting population is decreased by one for that vote.

       Allowing abstentions is a good i dea. They may not know, so rather than vote against it, they could just not vote (ML #671:16).

5. If a voting member is absent from a Home at the time a vote is taken, he must be informed and allowed to cast his vote on the matter, either at that time or upon his return.

       Any absentees can vote by mail or telephone, whichever is necessary, according to the urgency of the situation (ML #336A:36).

a) In the absence of a voting member, a Home can still vote on a matter and enact the outcom e. If, however, the vote of an absent member causes a change in the outcome of a Home's vote, the matter enacted will cease.

b) The absent member can, if he chooses, appoint a proxy (one who will vote in his place). If a proxy is appointed, the absent member cannot vote upon his return on a matter that was voted on in his absence, as his proxy already cast his vote.

(1) The proxy cannot vote in place of the absent member on financial matters.

B. Home Officer Elections.

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1. Elections for Home officers are to be held prior to the required date, as stipulated by your respective continental office, for your February and August Home monthly report.

a) Elections of temporary Home officers must be held within seven days of a new Home opening. Within 90 days of the new Home opening, another Home officer election must be held.

       When a new Home opens, the members must hold immediate Home teamwork elections to elect a temporary teamwork. Sometime during the next 90 days, preferably once the new Home has gathered most or all of their personnel, they must hold another election.

       Then, on the date for the next Home teamwork election, or vote of confirmation, the Home would conduct another election or a vote of confirmation, so as to be synchronized with other Homes worldwide.

2. One week before the home officer elections, the Home must read Home Election Guidelines in LNF 217 (Appendix D), and hold a meeting in which Home members can submit nominations.

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a) Nominations must have a second, and nominated members have the right to decline a nomination.

b) The names of those nominated must be posted in the Home until the election is held.

c) Homes of more than three voting members must have at least three Home officers who are responsible for Personnel, Outreach, Business, and Childcare (if there are children). If there are only three officers, then one would have to take two of these portfolios. The Home can decide by a simple majorit y if they want to have more than three Home officers.

d) Only voting members can be nominated and elected to be Home officers.

(1) Since 16- and 17-year-old members have no vote in financial matters, they are not eligible for the Business Home officer position.

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(2) Members 16 through 20, and voting members who have been live-in Charter Members for less than one year, will be considered "trainees" for their first six months as a Home officer if it is their first time ever as a Home officer, as outlined in point 6 of the Home Election Guidelines in Appendix D.

3. Each Home officer position (not portfolio) must be voted on in separate balloting. A simple majority determines the order of which position will be voted for first.

4. Once a nominee is elected to a position, they are not eligible for nominations to any other Home officer positions.

5. Elections must be by secret ballot.

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6. The Home officer nominee who receives the most votes for each H ome officer position will therefore occupy that position.

7. A committee of three people, one Home officer and two other members selected by the Home who are not Home officers, must count the votes. (Preferably not someone who has been nominated for a Home officer position.) This committee announces the results of the election.

a) In the event of a tie vote, a run-off election for that Home officer position is held.

(1) If the tie is unbroken after three run-off elections, then the Home must decide, by a simple majority, if the two candidates should both become part of the Home's officers, or if they should alternate being Home officers, one for the first three months of office and the other for the second three months.

8. Once the election is held and the results announced, the term of office begins immediately.

a) An outgoing Home officer must turn over all files, Home records, HER fund locations, etc., held in their portfolio, to the new incoming Home officers within 24 hours of the election.

9. If a Home officer position becomes vacant, or a Home officer resigns, the Home must hold an election within seven days to fill the position. The person elected to this position holds the office until the next election date.

       Teamwork elections should generally be conducted something like this: Before the elections, the Home should decide exactly what teamwork positions their Home will have. They must have three teamworkers who are responsible for Personnel, Outre ach, Business, and Childcare (unless there are no children). However, they may want to have a separate teamworker for teens, and/or some other portfolios, depending on the size and need of the Home.

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       A week before the election the voting members should read the Home Election Guidelines LNF in Appendix D. They would then nominate those they feel should be on the teamwork. This list of nominees who receive a second would be displayed in the Home, without listing which teamwork positi on these nominees might fill.

       On election day the Home would decide which teamwork position will be voted on first, second, etc. A "position" may contain more than one portfolio, if the Home has decided on a three-person teamwork. Then the Home would, from the list of nominees, vote for someone to fill the first position. These votes would then be counted and the person who had the most votes for that position would be announced. Then the Home would vote for someone to fill the second position , again from the list of remaining nominees. After the results are known, each succeeding position would be voted for until they are all filled.

       Once elected, new Home officers should read the Obligations of All Family Officers and the Responsibilities and Authority of Home Officers and take time to hear from the Lord in prophecy for any specifics He has for them in their new job, and areas they can continue to work on and grow in when it comes to their care of their Home and its members.

       From now on, each Home should hold mandatory teamwork elections. ... The voting in these elections should be by secret ballot, and you will have the opportunity to either vote in new teamwork members or to confirm your present teamwork. If you feel one or more members of your Home teamwork have not been good shepherds, you will have the opportunity to vote them out and vote in someone who you feel would do a better job. This is nothing new, each Home is supposed to have regular teamwork election s. We want you to be able to choose your own Home teamwork, people you love and trust and respect as good shepherds, those who have courage to make the difficult decisions which shepherds need to make, who can encourage you to do your best for the Lord and His work, and who can correct you when you're not doing your best. These elections are not popularity contests, and you have a serious responsibility to desperately pray for the Lord to lead and guide you to choose those whom He wants to sheph erd the Home. The elections should be accompanied by united prayer for the Lord's help and guidance (ML #2865:68,69).

C. Vote of Confirmation.

       Since the election of Home teamworks has now been changed from every three months to every six months, there is now a vote of confirmation that must be held three months after every scheduled Home teamwork election. The purpose of this mid-term confirmation vote is to make it possible to call for a new election should you find your teamwork incapable of doing the job, or if for some other reason the Home feels they should be removed from office. Since the majority of the Home elected the Home teamwork in the first place, it will require a two-thirds majority to recall them from office at the time of the vote of confirmation.

       Since voting to recall your Home teamwork is a rather sensitive matter, the vote of confirmation is to be held by secret ballot, a simple yes/no type of vote, and must be held whether everyone is generally happy with the performance of the teamwork or not.

       A Colony shepherd should be elected for a period of not less than three to six months to give him time to prove his capability, unless he thoroughly disqualifies himself, in which event a new election must be held to select a new leader (ML #329B:41).

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1. A vote of confirmation is a voting procedure held midway through the Home officers' period of office to confirm that they have the support of the Home. The Vote of Confirmation must be he ld, by secret ballot, by the required date, as stipulated by your respective continental office, for your May and November monthly report.

a) For Home officers the printed ballot should read:

       I confirm my Home teamwork: yes___ no ____

b) If a two-thirds majority vote against confirming the Home's officers, the Home will hold Home elections within seven days, in accordance with the Election Rules.

(1) The term of office of a new Home officer in such a case is only until the next Home E lection date.

       When the Home engages in a vote of confirmation, they vote for or against the teamwork as a whole. So if there is one member of your teamwork who you feel is not doing a good job and you definitely don't want them to finish the second three months of their term of office, you would need to vote against the whole teamwork. If the Home's vote determines that the teamwork is not confirmed, then a new election would be called and you could nominate those teamwork members who you feel were doing a good job to be on the next teamwork.

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2. Although the area officers are appointed by the continental office, a vote of confirmation by Home Referendum for the area officers must be held, by secret ballot, by the required date, as stipulated by your respective continental office, for your May and November monthly report. A Home's vote is the consensus of the majority vote of its members, and area officers' confirmation will be determined by a simple majority of the voti ng Homes.

a) For area officers, the printed secret ballot given to all voting members should read:

       I vote to confirm: [Officer's name] yes ____ no ____.

       I vote to confirm: [Officer's name] yes ____ no ____.

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b) The Home's vote would then be tallied. If the tally results in not confirming the area officer(s), then it must be sent to the continental office with their May and November monthly report, as follows:

The majority of our Home votes:

       [Officer's name] yes ____ no ____.

       [Officer's name] yes ____ no ____.

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c) It is not necessary to send affirmative votes of confirmation for area officers to the continental office.

       Area officers are appointed by the CROs; however, the Homes must confirm their appointment twice a year. If you do not feel one or more of the VSs should be on the VS teamwork, you should let your feelings be known through your vote.

       For convenience, the area office vote of confirmation will be held on the same dates as th e Home teamwork vote of confirmation, that is, before the Home reporting dates for May and November. Unlike a Home teamwork confirmation, in this case you are to confirm each individual officer, and not the VS teamwork as a whole. When voting for the area officers, the ballot must list the names of all the area officers, so members can then tick the "yes" or "no" confirmation box for each particular area officer.

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       Rather than requiring all area officer confirmations to be sent into the continental office, necessitating extra paperwork and communications and additional paper work for the offices, you are only required to send in your votes if your Home votes not to confirm one or more of its area officers. This means that if you do not send in your votes you are voting yes to confirmation of your area officers.

D. Home referendum.

1. A Home referendum is a voting procedure conducted by the continental office at any time to vote on area or country goals, and must be conducted as follows:

a) The office holding the referendum must submit a written proposal stating exactly what the Homes are being asked to vote on. This proposal must list both the pros and cons, and be read by the Home's voting members.

b) Each Home, regardless of size, counts as one vote. A simple majority determines the Home's vote unless it is regarding a financial matter, in which case a two-thirds majority determines it.

(1) A Home's vote must be conveyed, in the quickest possible manner, to the office conducting the referendum.

(2) The results of the Home referendum must be made public to all the participating Homes.

c) The outcome of the referendum is decided by a simple majority of the voting Homes, unless it is regarding a financial matter, in which case a two-thirds majority determines it.

2. Area goals can be initiated at any time by Home Referendum. All area goals are subject to a vote of confirmation every six months by Home Referendum, in May and Novemb er. Area goals are confirmed by a simple majority of the voting Homes, or a two-thirds majority if it is regarding a financial matter.

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a) Homes that vote to not confirm one or more of their area goals must send their opposing votes in to the continental office on or before their May and November monthly report. It is not necessary to send affirmative votes of confirmation for area goals to the continental office.

       Decisions which affect other Colonies in an area should not be ma de without consultation with them (ML #297:80).

       Please be prayerful about any new changes, and counsel and pray with those in your Home or in your fellowship area, as well as with your [CROs] (Maria #83:13).

b) For a vote of confirmation on area goals the printed ballot should read:

       Area goal 1 (description)       yes ____ no ____

       Area goal 2 (description)       yes ____ no ____

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c) The Home's vote would then be tallied. If the tally results in not confirming the area goal(s) then it must be sent to the continental office on or before their May and November monthly report, as follows:

The majority of our Home votes:

       [Area goal No. __ (description] yes ____ no ____.

       [Area goal No. __ (description] yes ____ no ____.

       Since the vote of confirmation will be held in May and November to confirm Home teamworks, area officers and area goals that are presently in effect, all of this information could be presented to the Homes simultaneously on one form.

55. FINANCIAL RULES

A. Any Home that lists non-payment of bills on two consecutive monthly reports will automatically be placed on first-stage Probationary Notice. If the following monthly report still lists non-payment of bills, the Home will automatically be placed on second-stage Probationary Notice, in accordance with points E. and F. of the Procedures for Placing a Home on Probationary Notice.

       As Dad has so often said, paying your bills on time is part of your Christian and Family testimony. If your Home doesn't pay its bills on time, you will be required to report it on your TRF. If your TRF indicates that for two consecutive months you are behind, then your Home will automatically be placed on Probationary Notice.

       When a Home is having regular financial problems, the VS should audit the Home's books and offer advice regarding their budgeting, income, etc., as per the Responsibilities and Authority of Area Officers, H.

       If they [financially unstable Homes] don't foll ow advice, they're going to reap the results. ... The VS can tell them but he can't make them do it. But if they won't listen, then they don't get the Word any more (ML #683:52,53).

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B. The Home Emergency Reserves (HER) are WS funds, which a Home has been given to keep on hand to be used solely in case of a serious and genuine emergency, other than normal daily living. (For example, they're not to be used for the payment of rent, etc.)

1. In the event of a field or Home being dec lared under emergency conditions as per the Authority of WS leadership, point B. WS reserves the right to recall all or part of the HER funds.

       In situations where there has been a genuine emergency such as severe persecution, WS may find it necessary to authorize collection of all HER funds of the area involved in order to help in the evacuation and other related expenses.

2. The disbursement of HER funds must be done according to the provisions listed below. Funds used according to these p rovisions do not have to be repaid by the Home and are therefore not debts. HER funds that are not used according to these provisions will be considered debts that the Home and its members will be held accountable to repay.

a) In case of an emergency, the Home can use up to $1,000 of the HER without permission from the continental office. (This is later referred to as the "$1,000 limit.")

(1) A Home can, by a two-thirds majority, decide if an emergency is serious enough to warrant the use of all, or a portion of, their $1,000 limit, and upon deciding, can use such a portion. Within three days the Home must notify the continental office of their decision, the nature of the emergency and the amount of funds withdrawn from their HER.

(2) If a Home uses any of the $1,000 for non-emergency needs not covered by the HER provisions, the Home will be responsible to repay the debt. Funds deemed by the continental office, as having not been used for emergency purposes will be considered a debt. The continental office will inform the Home within four weeks if this is the case.

(3) Once a Home has used up their $1,000 limit, either because of one or a number of emergencies, any further withdrawal from the HER can only be made with permission of the continental office as outlined in point b. following.

b) If an emergency arises, which would put the Home over their $1,000 limit (of cumulative expenditures), the Home can, by a two-thirds majority, decide to request permission of the continental office to use a specified sum over the $1,000 limit. Upon receipt of permission, the Home can use the agreed amount.

(1) If a Home or Home officer uses any of the HER funds above the $1,000 limit without receiving permission from the continental office, the amount used will become a Home debt and must be paid, in accordance with Responsibilities of the Charter Home: Regarding Financial Matters, B. 1.

c) If a Home officer uses any of the HER funds without agreement of two -thirds of the Home (plus continental office approval if over $1,000), the Home officer will immediately lose his position as a Home officer and will not be eligible for Home office responsibilities for a period of not less than one year. The amount used will become a personal debt of the offending Home officer and must be paid, in accordance with the Right of Mobility, point A. 4.

(1) The Home by two-thirds majority can instead decide to incur this as a Home debt.

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d) When a Home closes and disbands, the HER funds that remain, after legitimate expenditures (approved by the CRO office and therefore not considered Home debts), must be returned to the continental office in order to be available for other Homes.

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C. Every Home must maintain at least $50 per person in Tool funds. Either the tools or the funds must be transferred with individuals to their new Home when they move. Not maintaining the $50 Tool fund per person will be considered a Home debt, as out lined in the Financial Rules, A. and Home members will be in violation of the Charter for non-payment.

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       When an individual or family is moving to a new country or continent where the tools of their former Home/field are either not useful (due to their format or language), or inconvenient to travel with, the member(s) may prefer to carry their Tool fund in cash, and this would be the ideal.

       The Home could decide to purchase the tools from the individual or family with the cash the y are setting aside as seedcorn instead of ordering those tools from their PPC/SC. This or any other arrangement should be brought up for discussion in the Home council and would need to be decided upon in love, prayer and counsel by the Home and individuals involved - taking into consideration what will be most beneficial for all.

D. The amount of funds collected by an individual Home member for travel, landing funds or the purchase of some major personal item, as well as the methods and pro cedures used to collect them, and the disbursement of such, is to be decided upon by a two-thirds majority.

       As you will recall, some years ago everyone turned in their personal reserves and finances for the sake of the HER fund, which has been addressed above. At this point, allowances need to be made in certain situations where a Home member might have to build up some personal savings for a specific purpose, such as saving funds for traveling and landing funds for changing fields, or the pur chase of some major personal item such as a guitar or a caravan, or something along those lines.

       In the past, there were occasions where members held personal flee funds, but when their Home had financial problems there was sometimes pressure from the shepherds on a person to donate their flee funds to pay the rent or other bills. In order to keep this from happening again, all voting members (18 years of age and over) of the Home will need to be involved in these decisions, so that everyone i s aware of all aspects of the situation.

       The methods and procedures for collecting and saving these funds and how the funds can be spent, and the amounts that are collected, have to be decided upon by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members (18 years of age and older). There needs to be agreement between the person trying to save the funds and the Home as to how the collecting, spending and amounts will be handled.

       The person should first explain to the Home why he needs to collec t the funds, how much he needs, and how he intends to get and save these funds. For example, he may say that he needs $4,000 to pay for his fare to India, to purchase some needs before he goes, and to have some left over for landing funds when he gets there. His plan for raising the funds is to write his relatives, and he would like to approach two of the Home's friends specifically, and also to inform the members of the Home's Church of Love of his vision, in the hope that they may want to help him with some gifts. Also, he'd like to ask if he can keep five dollars from every video and two dollars from every tape that he gets out.

       The Home would then need to discuss this and decide which of these proposals they agree to. They may say that they really can't afford to let him have five dollars from every video, but that all of the other proposals are fine. They would then have to commit themselves to allowing him to keep the funds collected, no matter what the financial state of the H ome is, or becomes in the future. So if in three months, when this fellow's parents have given him $2,000, and the Home's friends have given $1,000, and the Home is financially behind and needs $3,000 for rent and utilities, they can't demand or coerce or otherwise attempt to persuade him to unwillingly use his funds to pay the rent and utility bills. Of course, the member is free to use these funds for this purpose if it is what he feels the Lord wants him to do.

       On the other hand, when initi ally discussing the arrangement with this member, the Home may decide that the amount of time he is going to spend on fundraising for his trip is going to take away from his other duties, so they could decide that 15% of what he collects should be turned in to the Home for running expenses. If all parties agree, then that would be what should happen.

       The main point is that the Home should discuss it at the onset and decide together on some arrangement that seems good to all, and then they shou ld stick to their agreement. The member should be allowed to personally keep the funds the Home has agreed to let him keep in his possession if he chooses to.

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       If the member's plans change and he decides to remain in the Home, or will be making a move that will require less funds than the original amount voted on, the funds which the Home allowed the member to set aside in preparation for his move should be returned to the Home and distribution made in accordance with point A. 4. f ) in the Right of Mobility.

1. Solicited "designated gifts" must be used for the purpose for which they were designated according to the prior agreement of the Home.

2. Unsolicited "designated gifts" must be used for the purpose for which they are designated.

       There are times when members are given financial gifts for a specific purpose; these are known as designated gifts. When a Home or an individual are given such gifts, they must use them for the purpose for which they were given.

       Designated gifts are a holy responsibility to be given to whom and for what they were given! And if you want or need them for something else, then you must not give them to something else without asking the permission of the donor. ... Many the time I've been tempted to use something for something else, but thank God, I think I've always used it for what it was given for. So when God found out I could be trusted to be honest and use it for what He wanted it used for, or for what the donors had expressed their desire to have it used for, then both God and the donors found out I could be trusted, so I get more and more and more. Because I don't want it for myself. I ask for it for others and I give it to others just as fast as I can! Praise the Lord! (ML #2447:15,42.)

       If the gift is solicited—that is, the member is specifically asking someone for a donation for a specified purpose—then he or she should do so in counsel with the Home. If the gift is unsolicited—that is, someone gi ves it for a specific purpose, but the member or the Home did not ask for it—it must also be used for the purpose it was given.

       If there are funds left over after the item is purchased, these funds should be used as the Home sees fit, as with all other Home income.

       In regards to unsolicited designated gifts, Home members should keep in mind the "One Wife" vision and take into account the needs of other Home members, and particularly the children of their Home, and share the abundance of the gifts they get with others in their Home, and thereby train our children to be giving and unselfish.

       The principle of designated gifts is that a gift to an individual should be used for the purpose it was given, but once the item is purchased, it becomes the property of the Family, and of the Home in particular. If the Home decides the member can take it with him when he leaves the Home, then the member is free to do so. However, if the Home feels the Home's need is greater, then the Home can vote for the item to remain in the Home. In praying and counseling about this, the departing member's ministries, gifts and talents should be taken into consideration before the Home brings the matter to a final vote. For example, in most cases an inspirationalist would be allowed to take his guitar, a secretary her computer, and a handyman his tools.

       Living Acts 2:44-45 and sharing our material goods can sometimes be a complicated issue, since there are many different factors in the equation that need to be taken into consideration. We can't deal with every single case here, since every situation is so different, so the Home has to pray and seek the Lord about the decision together. It's really up to your Home to make the decision by a simple majority. But please keep in mind that the Lord will bless you and your Home if you apply the Law of Love in these matters as you seek to find the solution that is best for all—for the individual, those who gave the donation, the Home, and th e overall work—as Dad and Mama have taught us for years. The main factors in making such a decision are love and a sacrificial, giving attitude that prefers the needs of others more than your own.

E. Voting members who are less than 18 years of age may attend Home council meetings when finances are discussed, and participate in the discussion, but not vote on financial matters, which require a two-thirds majority vote.

56. HOME SIZE RULES

A. Minimum Size: A Charter Home consists of four or more Charter voting members residing together.

1. Homes with members who are under 18 years of age must have at least two resident members who are 25 years of age or older, unless the underage members are living with their parent(s).

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a) The continental office may grant permission for someone under 18 to live in the same Home as their spouse or a sibling who is 18 years of age or older, even if that Hom e does not have two members over 25.

       The two-year-old child of a 22-year-old adult couple may live in a Home with other YAs, without any 25-year-olds needing to be present. However, other than small children living with their young parents, or 16- and 17 -year olds receiving permission to live with an older sibling, if there are not two people in a Home who are at least 25, there shouldn't be members younger than 18. As with the few other restrictions on the 16- and 17-year-old age group, this is mainly for legal reasons. (Please refer to the Right of Mobility, A. 1. B) for details on parental permission necessary for teens joining other Homes.)

2. If members leaving a Home results in the Home falling below the minimum Home size of four (but not less than two) voting members, the Home may keep its Charter Member status providing the second monthly report shows a population of at least four voting members.

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3. When pioneering a new Home, a team of two or three voting m embers can function as a Charter Home for their first six months before being required to reach the minimum Home size of four voting members.

       Allowing this six-month grace period will enhance the Right of Mobility, making it easier for members to launch out to pioneer if they wish. Notice, though, that after six months this team must increase its population to four voting members. A voting member is someone 16 years of age or over who has been in the Charter Family for at least six months, so even if this team wins two new disciples, it hasn't increased its population by two voting members since babes are not voting members. Voting members from existing Homes will need to join this new pioneer Home sometime during its first six months of existence for the Home to retain its Charter Member status.

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4. The continental office can authorize exemptions to the minimum Home population size when they feel a case warrants it, providing the Home has a minimum of two voting members .

       The continental office may grant exceptions to the four-voting-member minimum when they feel a case warrants it. For example, a couple is fulfilling the Charter requirements and generally obeying the "Fundamental Family Rules," but because their children have serious behavioral problems that affect other children they live with, others don't wish to live with them. If the continental office feels it's warranted for a valid reason, they can allow this couple and their children to live in thei r own Home without other voting members.

       In the rare case of a single parent with children who has a hard time remaining in or finding a Home, the continental office can likewise allow him or her to move in with another single parent and function as a Charter Home without having the required four voting members. So it would be possible to have a Home of two single mothers with their children, or a single father and single mother with their collective children.

       In some instances, two or three voting members may be unable to get up to four voting members in the required time. In that case, they may contact their continental office, which has the authority to grant them an exemption; either for a specified time or indefinitely, if they feel it is warranted. (Undersized Homes containing single parents will be given special consideration.)

       The revelation the Lord had given us on how to win the youth of the World for Christ: It was not to be by total scatteration of helpless individu als and their individual infiltration through the Enemy's lines without any help, organization or Colony backing and encouragement, but it was to be by sending forth those who had the faith to almost individually pioneer small new Colonies with our encouragement, help and laborers (ML #316A:10).

       We have proven that communal living on the local level can be done, and with us this has been eminently successful under the blessing of God in being one of the most powerful contributing factors to ou r worldwide success! (ML #330A:5; DB6.)

B. Maximum size:

1. A Home must not consist of more than 35 total members, unless it is a Service Home.

2. A Service Home must not consist of more than 45 total members, unless:

a) The continental office requests and receives approval for a specified number of personnel from World Services leadership. Upon receipt of approval, the Service Home must not exceed the approved number of personnel.

       Presently a Home may not exceed 35 total live-in m embers, including adults and children. (The exception to this is a Service Home, as explained above) Each Home must have its own utilities, independent of the other Home(s), such as electricity, gas, water, etc. Each Home should be financially independent and must send in the minimum tithe monthly. Also as pointed out in Required Meetings and Activities, C., each Home must have its own (separate) Home council meetings, childcare meetings, and so forth. As well, each Home must have its own separa te mailing address, as outlined in the World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules, B. This means that a Home expanding to over 35 members (or 45 in the case of a Service Home) is required to split into two separate dwellings.

       By stating that the maximum personnel limit of a Home is 35, we are not suggesting that Homes should try to reach this limit. Generally we hope that Homes can keep well below that, somewhere between 20-25, as such smaller Homes are much easier to manage and shepherd. If yo ur Home begins to increase in personnel towards the 30 mark, you might want to consider splitting into two Homes, with perhaps 20 remaining in one and the other 10 moving into a new Home. It might be helpful for the new Home to remain nearby so that you can cooperate together as you continue to build a work in your city.

       Another thing to keep in mind when judging the population of your Home is the ratio between the amount of personnel and the available rooms in the house. Dad said, "I want eve ry worker... to have comfortable quarters, and warm comfortable beds..." (ML #301A:49). Your house should be big enough to comfortably house those in the Home. Going down to a smaller Home size does not necessarily mean going to smaller houses. Make sure your house is large enough for your Home population, so that everyone is comfortable and not overcrowded.

       Everyone should have a bed in a bedroom. Couples should have their own rooms; singles should at least have a room with other singles. No one should have to sleep on a mattress on the floor unless it's an emergency, your Home is in the early stages of pioneering a work, or it's local custom, like it is in Japan.

       Your children need rooms for schooling; you might need an office room, etc.

       If members of your Home don't have their own bed and place to put their things, then you either have too many people, or your house is too small for the amount of people you have, and therefore you need to find bigger housing.

       Just because yo ur house is not full to the brim doesn't mean that you need to bring in extra personnel to fill it! In fact, we recommend that Homes have an extra room that they can use for a guestroom, or a prayer room or nap room.

       I am still firmly convinced that the small independent Colonies are the most effective and the hardest to stop! We've had some big ones that collapsed or got slowed to a standstill just by their own size and weight! (ML #127:44.)

       Our first shifting of gears is going to be a ma ndatory change in Colony size. This will now give an opportunity for the development of new leadership in each small easily manageable unit. This will reduce our Colony sizes closer to the ideal family-size unit and Heavenly Home instead of a monstrous mess of unmanageable conglomeration! (ML #329B:25,36).

       Perhaps a very few slightly oversize Colonies may be necessary for the handling of ... specialized operations [Service Homes] (ML #155:9).

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C. A Charter Member who stays in a Ho me for more than 30 days, who is not reported on another Home's TRF, is considered a member of that Home, and must be reported as such on the Home's monthly report. (See World Service Reporting and Mailing Rules, A. and Right of Mobility, A. 7.)

D. If a Home has exceeded the maximum personnel limit or fallen short of the minimum Home size on two consecutive monthly reports, the Home will be placed on Probationary Notice, in accordance with the Procedures for Placing a Home on Probationary Not ice, points D. E. and F. None of the Home members will lose their Right of Mobility.

       These [DO] Letters will be withheld ... until such time as you notify us that you have divided your Colony into smaller Colonies ... when you will again be placed on the full-fledged membership Colony list. ... This means that if you want to stay on the regular membership mailing list for all Letters you must all reduce in size ... or you'll lose your Letters! (ML #329B:29,37.)

57. REQUIRED MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES

A. Devote one day each month to prayer, praise and thanksgiving.

       Since most of us are already accustomed to having monthly area-wide or continental prayer days, we would like to continue this very needed and fruitful practice. Your continental office will designate a monthly prayer day in your area in which all Homes will be expected to participate. We realize, though, that at times unavoidable circumstances occur. So if for some reason you can't hold your Home's prayer day on the assigned day, you can hold it a day or two before or after the assigned day. For example, if the assigned prayer day is the second Wednesday of each month, and one particular month you already have an unavoidable appointment on that day, your Home could hold your prayer day a few days before or after, whatever is most convenient for your Home.

       We suggest that your Home also take time on this day to hear from the Lord for any needed direction, counsel or words of encouragement that He may have for you.

       We would like to encourage you to start having a Prayer Day on a monthly basis, preferably on a regular workday instead of a rest day or family day. ... I'm afraid if we don't take time to pray, who knows what losses we're going to sustain just because we don't take that extra time. The time we put into prayer instead of work will count much more in the long run (LNF 164).

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1. Instead of designating a full day as your Monthly Prayer Day, y ou may prefer two half-days during the month.

B. Have prayer vigil a minimum of four times per week, but preferably daily.

       As Dad has taught us, this Revolution was born in prayer, so we feel it is important that each Home include prayer vigil as a part of their daily activities. We realize that every Home's situation and schedule is different, so although one hour daily per Home would be the ideal, it may not be realistic on a daily basis. Therefore we would like to leave the structuring a nd length of your prayer vigil times up to each Home. prayer vigil can be fun and inspiring. If necessary, you could even assign the prayer vigil to two individuals who could pray during certain daily activities like hanging out the laundry, a walking get-out, etc.

       We hope you are also continuing your regular daily Prayer Vigils. Thanks for your love and faithfulness. Yours in Him, Maria and Peter (LNF 97).

C. A minimum of two Home council meetings per month for voting members, at least o ne of which must address financial matters. A minimum of 50% of the Home's voting members must be present.

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1. New members in the Family less than six months cannot attend Home council meetings.

       The Home must have at least two Home council meetings per month, one of which is devoted entirely or in part to financial matters. When it says a minimum, that doesn't mean that that's all the Home has to do, rather that's the least they must do, it is what is required. Some Homes might fi nd that they need a weekly Home council meeting while others might feel that they are needed twice a week. It's up to them to decide, but the Home cannot decide to have less than two Home council meetings per month.

       Home council meetings should be held at a convenient time and when the greatest number of the Home's voting members are available. There must be at least 50% of the Home's voting members in the meeting. Remember that if you don't attend a Home council meeting, you still can vote on the matters when you return Home. Or you can give someone your proxy, which allows them to vote for you in your absence

       Also, if a member abstains, the Home's voting population is decreased by one for that particular vote.

       (See Election Rules, A. for further details on voting procedures.)

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       As new members do not become voting members until after six months in the Family, they are not allowed to attend Home council meetings. A person on Probationary Status or Partial Excommunica tion is no longer a voting member of the Home until reinstated, and therefore temporarily does not attend these meetings.

       I don't want you [the shepherd] making any decisions for them. You are merely to be an advisor, a shepherd, a counselor to them—not driving them. You are to simply supervise them. You call the meeting, act as its chairman, open the meeting and present the problem and ask for discussion. Then frame it into a motion or resolution and take a vote on it, and be sure you have appointed somebody to carry it out (ML #297:76).

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D. Send a representative from their Home to at least one city council meeting in every two-month period, if their Home is in a metropolitan area with more than one Charter Home.

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       If a city has more than one Charter Home, a city council consisting of representatives from the local Homes should meet at least every two months, if not more often. In this case, in saying city we're referring to the metropolitan area, so tha t cities where the Homes may be within different city limits but still in the same metropolis would also be required to hold city councils. Every Home that is in a city or metropolitan area with more than one Charter Home is required to send a representative to at least one city council meeting in every two-month period.

1. The Homes should elect a city council chairperson for a two-month term.

       The chairperson position can be held indefinitely if the city council continues to elect the same chairperson, or it can change hands at two-month intervals.

2. The chairperson's responsibilities are to organize the city council meetings and keep a written record of all decisions, to be given to all the Homes in the city, and made available to the area office upon request.

       The chairperson is also responsible to pass any meeting notes on to the next chairperson when he leaves this post. The chairperson may either chair the city council meetings or appoint someone to do so.

       The city co uncil chairperson is not be a shepherding role, and the chairperson has no leadership authority other than simply helping to organize and coordinate the meetings. The chairperson is not obligated to give any charismatic speeches or presentations; all he/she needs to do is simply ask other individuals from the area to lead the inspiration and/or open the floor for testimonies, points of discussion or business, etc. City councils are encouraged on a monthly basis, with at least one required in any given two-month period.

E. A minimum of one witnessing meeting per month for voting members to discuss and pray about outreach activities and plans, and to pray for friends, contacts, etc. A minimum of 50% of the Home's voting members must be present.

       Because witnessing is so important, and it's vital that the Home prays for its contacts and friends, and decides what their witnessing goals are and how they are going to meet those goals, etc., it is required that each Home have at least one witnessing meeting per month, in addition to their two required Home council meetings. Again, some Homes may find it necessary to have such meetings more regularly, and/or to address the subject during a portion of their Home council meetings.

F. A minimum of one childcare/parenting meeting per month for Homes with children. A minimum of 50% of the Home's voting members must be present.

       The care of our children is of the utmost importance. Thus each Home with children is required to have a minimum of one childcare/parenting meeting per month, although we recommend two. A small Home, one that only has seven children, for example, probably doesn't need to have two childcare/parenting meetings per month; whereas a Home with more children might find it necessary. It will depend on the Home and the amount of children in it, but the minimum is one per month.

       It's so important that all those involved in the training of our children counsel together and agree on policies.—Educationa l, disciplinary, recreational—every area of childcare should be discussed and decided upon together (ML #2670:21).

G. All children 13 years old and younger must have a minimum of one hour of parent time at least 5 times per week, with their parent(s) or guardian(s), or with a qualified adult if the parent(s) or guardian(s) are away from the Home.

       Children need to spend time with their parents, and so must have at least one hour of parent time five times per week. Although we feel it's best that they have it daily, we don't want to be unrealistic by demanding it seven nights a week, which may not be practical. If the parents or guardians are not in the Home for a number of days, they or the Home should assign someone to have parent time with their children. They should take the children's wishes into account when assigning an adult to be with them during parent time.

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H. All members ages 9 through 17 must have a minimum of one hour of personal time every two weeks wit h a shepherd or designated adult, or participate in a one-hour weekly open forum discussion chaired by a shepherd and comprising other members of their age group.

1. Personal time may be conducted by a Home officer or parent(s), or another competent voting member assigned by the Home's officers.

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2. Members ages 12 through 17 may put forth suggestions as to whom they would prefer to have personal time with.

       All members from ages 9 through 17 need to have personal time of one ho ur every two weeks, or alternatively open forums every week, if that is what they vote for. Home teamwork members, parents, or other competent adults, YAs or even senior teens may conduct the personal time.

       The JETTs and teens may give suggestions as to who they want to have their personal time with. It may not always work out for them to be with the person they choose, but as much as possible the Home should try to comply with their wishes.

       Anything shared within personal time talks should be treated as confidential information within the teamwork and should not be unnecessarily shared with others.

       Besides the common problems that all children experience, most children are bound to have special problems, individual fears and individual worries at some time.—And taking personal time with them is the only way that I know of to let the kids really unburden their hearts, and for you to see where they're at so you can effectively address their problems. How else can you do that, b ut by spending time with them? If you're going to get good results with your children and really help them get over their problems, you're simply going to have to make such time with them. ... All children need somebody special to be close to and occasions upon which they can pour out their hearts to someone who will patiently hear them out (ML #2631:10,26).

I. Open Forum Discussions:

1. Each individual age group, from OCs to YAs, should vote on whether their group prefers open forums, or personal time, or some combination thereof.

       If an age group votes to have an open forum, or pow-wow type meeting, then the rules for open forum discussions apply as follows:

2. Members, ages 14-20, should vote by age group on the topics to be discussed in their age group's open forum and must inform the Home officers of their decision.

3. Members ages 14-20 should vote by age groups for those whom they feel are best qualified to lead the discussion and must inform the Home officers of th eir decision.

a) If the Home's officers have an objection to either the topic or the person chosen to lead the discussion, they should endeavor to settle the matter with the age group that chose the topic or person. If the matter cannot be settled through counsel and prayer, it should be decided by a two-thirds majority of the Home's voting members.

       The teens and YAs can vote for who they would like to head the discussion, and they must inform the teamwork of their decision. You'll notice t hat there is a clause stating that, "If the Home's officers have an objection to either the topic or the person chosen to lead the discussion, they should endeavor to settle the matter with the age group that chose the topic or person." This is not to bottle up the teens and YAs and make them only discuss things that the teamwork wants them to discuss. But we must remember that it is the teamwork's responsibility to shepherd the Home, and if the teens decide they want to have an open forum discu ssion that is inappropriate—for example, on the benefits of heavy metal music—then the teamwork has the authority to object. Or if the teamwork feels the person that is chosen to head the meeting is not qualified to lead a discussion on a certain subject, the teamwork could object.

       In such a case, the teamwork should discuss their objections with the teens or young people. If prayer and discussion can't settle the matter, then a two-thirds majority should determine it.

       In order to foster open communication in the Home among the adults and teens, and to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to express their feelings and to raise questions they feel need to be addressed, each Home [could have an] ... open forum discussion ... [in which adults and young people could] participate, and each should feel the freedom to bring up any matters of concern on any subject they feel needs to be discussed, whether teen-related or not, such as finances, scheduling, personnel, witnessing, per secution preparation, etc. (ML #2865:75).

4. Members, ages 9-13, may put forth suggested topics for discussion in the open forums.

       The JETTs and OCs may suggest, but they can't demand, that particular topics be covered.

5. Some young people who participate in open forums may still need some personal time, so shepherds should put forth the effort to fulfil those needs.

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J. Every member 18 years of age and above must have the opportunity to spend a sufficient amount of persona l time with a Home officer or someone designated by the Home officers. "Sufficient amount" cannot be less than one hour per month.

1. The responsibility of adult personal time should be shared by all Home officers, or their designated representatives, but does not have to be divided equally among the Home officers.

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a) Those 18 and over may request to have personal time with a specific Home officer.

2. Personal time may be divided up into two or more sessions.

3. It is perm issible to have personal time simultaneously with two adults together if they agree to this.

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       It is important for the teamwork or other shepherds to have heart-to-heart communication with those in the Home. Therefore every member age 18 and over must have the opportunity to have a minimum of one hour of personal time per month, with a Home teamworker, or someone the Home teamwork designates. The adult's preference of whom he or she wishes to have personal time with should be taken into consideration, though it may not always work out.

       The Home teamworkers don't have to divide adult personal time equally amongst themselves, but they all should be involved. The personal time does not have to be in one consecutive hour slot, but if necessary can be divided up into two or more sessions totaling one hour. If those involved are in agreement, then the shepherd can have personal time simultaneously with two people instead of one.

       Matters discussed in personal time should be t reated as confidential information by the Home teamwork and should not be unnecessarily shared with others.

       Somebody, some way, has to be able to spend time with the individuals who need it.—You've got to have someone who can take the time to counsel with people and spend time with people and listen to them and pray for them and give them the help and solutions and guidance from the Word they need! You might say, "Well, that may be the ideal, but it's not very realistic." Well, I believe it 's a necessity, therefore it can be a reality! (ML #2631:22.)

       People usually want to pour out, they usually want to talk. ... If you're interested in people and you love them, then you need to learn how to get them to come out of themselves and try to respond and to communicate. Communication is pretty important! It is what we do all the time, it's our job! (ML #1796:8.)

K. Homes must have a minimum of two family days per month (recommended weekly), on which resident children and their resi dent parents or guardians spend the day together.

       Family days, in which parents and their children who live in the same Home spend the day together, are a vital part of our Homes and are therefore required. We feel that it's best to have them on a weekly basis, but requiring it weekly could be unrealistic. This would hamper road trips going out for more than six days, and other Home activities. Therefore, a minimum of two per month is required, though we recommend having them weekly when possi ble.

       Our own flesh-and-blood children are one of our greatest ministries, one of our most important ministries, and a ministry for which we'll be held responsible by both God and man! We must not fail in it, no matter how busy we are! (ML #110:25.)

58. WORLD SERVICE REPORTING AND MAILING RULES

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A. All Charter Members must tithe and appear on a Charter Home's TRF each month without exception.

B. Homes must have a post office box or a mail service, one which cannot be used for receiving GP mail, at which they receive their WS mailings. The Home's street address or a general delivery address (Poste Restante) is not acceptable. The continental office can grant exceptions.

       Homes must have a P.O. box or a mail service to rec eive their mailings, but in certain situations CROs can make exceptions. The P.O. box or mail service used for WS mailings cannot be used for receiving GP mail.

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C. Homes are responsible to send in their tithe, their 1% FAF contribution, their monthly report, and their semi-annual Home Self-Evaluation Checklist on the required dates set by their continental office.

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1. In cases of no or low or late tithe or 1% FAF contribution, no or late Home monthly report, or no or l ate semi-annual Home Self-Evaluation Checklist, or being in debt for two consecutive months, a Home will automatically be placed on Probationary Notice.

       Homes must send in their TRF, tithe ($100 minimum, or $50 in poor mission fields as specified by WS), 1% FAF contribution and semi-annual Home Self-Evaluation Checklist (Appendix C) on time. Please be mindful to fill in all the designated spaces.

       To be a TRFer and receive the full magazine with the whole counsel of God in the MO and DO Let ters, you must fill in your TRF Report in full!... If you want the mag from us, get your report and gift [tithe] in on time!!!—Or no mag! (ML #888:3; 886:PS.)

D. The continental office in consultation with WS leadership determines the methods, procedures and dates for sending the Homes' monthly report and tithe. The Home officers and/or those responsible for sending off the monthly report and tithe are the only members of the Home who should be privy to this information.

1. Homes may deci de, by a majority vote, to permit voting members to read the monthly report before it is sent off.

       The CROs, in consultation with WS, decide on what day the Homes in their area must send in their TRFs. The CROs decide on the method of collecting the reports and tithes according to what is best and legal in their country. Information about the TRF address and tithe procedures is something that only the teamworkers or those involved needs to know.

E. The minimum monthly tithe is $100, unless specified otherwise by World Services.

       In light of the counsel the Lord gave Dad through a dream about finances and how He will bless if we all give (ML #2937, Lifelines 22), the minimum tithe is now $100 for most countries, and $50 for certain poor countries suffering economic hardship or currency devaluation. Exceptions for specific Homes due to extreme economic hardship may also be granted by WS upon request by the Home. (For more details on tithing, see FSM 331, "Answers to Your Tithing, F AF, HER, Pioneer Gift, & Home Loan Questions".)

       I think it's worth $100 a month to belong to the Family! Amen? And anybody who can't produce that much, or rather that little, just doesn't deserve it and is not worthy of it (ML #2527:32).

59. MARRIAGE RULES

       Marriage, according to the Scriptures, is the union of a man and a woman, as husband and wife. Members may freely marry within the Family providing they do so in accordance with the rules listed below. Those who marry enter into a covenant together between themselves and the Lord, committing themselves to love, care, and be responsible for one another and their children, in a Christ-centered union that glorifies God. Those who enter into such a covenant or contract shou ld do so with the commitment that they will remain married and continue to function together as a married couple permanently. Nevertheless, there may be times when it becomes evident that a marital union is no longer glorifying God and is proving detrimental to children of the marriage, or in extraordinary circumstances one of the partners is called by God to a new direction in their work for Him. In such a case, the partners may wish to dissolve the marriage in accordance with the Permanent Mar ital Separation Rules.

       Besides accepting Jesus as their Savior, getting married is probably one of the most important decisions a person will make. Before a couple marries, they should determine in their hearts before the Lord and express one to another that they are committed to one another permanently, unless or until the Lord shall call them to be apart.

       The commitment of marriage is a commitment to love and a commitment to the responsibilities of love.—That responsibility to love and ca re for your partner in good times and bad, in sickness and in health, even if your emotional attachment lessens over the years. Marriage requires God's love, that ever-enduring love that forgives, that overcomes bitterness, familiarity and failure, love that carries us through life's difficulties and keeps on loving.

       I still believe in real old-fashioned love and falling in love and wanting to take care of somebody and help somebody and be their mate, be half of them, and have their children ! I'm that old-fashioned! (ML #2433:64.)

       Marriage is supposed to be for life, except for the most unusual circumstances, truly desperate and/or Scriptural exceptions! Everything humanly possible should be done to keep couples together, both for their sake as well as for the sake of the children and the work of God! (ML #154:78.)

       Of course, there are relationship arrangements other than marriage. A man and woman may love one another and decide to room together, with the understanding that i t is not a marriage but instead is a temporary union, which is their prerogative.

A. Two voting members wishing to marry must declare their intention to do so, first to the Home officers, and then to the voting members of the Home. Once such a public declaration is made, the couple's engaged to marry begins. The period of engagement is to be not less than 90 days before the marriage.

1. Prior to their engagement, couples should get to know each other well in order to ascertain their compat ibility.

2. During their engagement, it is advisable for the couple to live in the same Home, to regularly spend time together in prayer, spiritual fellowship and interaction. The couple may room together, if they choose, for all or part of their engagement period, if they are within the same age group for sexual sharing, as per the Sex and Affection Rules, D. through G.

3. It is recommended that at some time before the marriage the Home prays and hears from the Lord for the engaged couple , and a transcript of the prophecies given to the couple.

4. If the couple decides at any time to end the engagement, they may do so. The Home must be informed that the engagement has ended.

5. Once the period of engagement is completed and the couple decides they want to marry, the Home should hold a simple ceremony to acknowledge that the couple is now married. Couples are of course free to legalize their marriage.

       In order to declare their intentions, and to ensure that there are no m isunderstandings within the Home, two people who have decided they want to get married should first announce their decision to the Home teamwork and then to all the voting members. This way everyone in the Home is aware that they have become engaged to marry and that they are officially entering an engagement period.

       Since there have been a number of questions in regards to the terminology, whether this period should be called "Make It Work" or "going steady," etc., we felt that calling it an "engagement period" would wipe the slate clean from any preconceived notions that the Family has had.

       Prior to the actual engagement, couples should get to know each other well, and only make their engagement declaration when they are quite serious about the matter and are pretty sure they want to marry. Engagement is an actual commitment to marry, but it allows a contemplative period of at least three months for the couple to seriously seek the Lord and to determine that it is definitely the Lord's will for them to marry. Of course, at any time after the engagement period begins, if either member concludes that it is not God's will they can call off the engagement.

       The period of engagement must last for at least three months, and once the engagement period is over, the couple is free to marry.—This doesn't mean that the couple must get married after the three months expire; they can marry at any time after the engagement period is completed. It's up to them.

       During the engagement period, the couple should regularly seek the Lord and read His Word together in order to build a spiritual foundation on which to base their marriage. They should read Letters on the subject of marriage and appropriate portions of other publications such as "Marvellous Marriage" and "How to Love." They should also seek counsel from their Home teamwork as to whether they feel that the potential marriage is of the Lord. They should also ask the Home to pray and hear from the Lord regarding the marriage. Having direct words from the Lord in prophecy is a great blessing, especially to refer to later when the marriage encounters difficult days. At such a time, having prophecies, visions or verses to look back on can provide a spiritual anchor for the marriage.

       During the period of engagement it would be advisable for the couple to live in the same Home, though we cannot say they definitely must do so, as there may be some situations where this might not be possible. But regardless of w here they live, they should try to regularly spend time together for prayer, reading of the Word, and spiritual interaction. The degree of interaction is up to the couple. Some couples, age permitting, may prefer to room together for their period of engagement; others may choose not to.

       If either of those engaged already have children from a previous marriage, they would probably want to inform the children ahead of time about their plans to marry. Such changes can be difficult on children, an d sometimes it's only when one of their parents decides to remarry that they fully come to grips with the fact that their parents are permanently separated. When children are involved, a lot of love, patience and explanation are necessary. The couple may decide that it's best not to move in together before they marry if they feel it will be difficult for the children.

       If at some time an engaged couple decide that they don't want to marry, the Home should be informed of the decision.

       We use d to have a rule: you couldn't be betrothed until you had lived and worked together, or even slept together if you wanted to, in the same Home ... until you knew each other real well (ML #792:39).

       I think it would be wonderful if all of our folks who are seriously considering getting together would seek the Lord for His confirmation and stamp of approval by having some or all of the members of their Home unite in a time of prayer and hearing from the Lord together. Certainly in such a serious decision it seems like both parties would welcome all the counsel they can get (ML #2931:111,112).

B. Once the engagement begins, the Home officers must inform the area and continental officers of the couple's engagement.

1. If the Home, area or continental officers have reservations about, or object to, the proposed marriage, it is their duty to express their reservations or objections to the couple, either as a couple or individually.

a) Family officers have no authority to forbid a marriage, except in the case of a 16 or 17-year-old when their parent(s) do not reside in the Home.

       Although the Home, area and continental officers have no authority to keep a couple from being married, it is certainly within their authority to offer advice and counsel on the matter. This especially holds true if they have reservations about or object to the marriage, in which case they are responsible to express their reservations or objections. But the final decision is, of course, up to the couple themselves.

       In the case of a YA marriage, if their parents don't feel it's the best match or have objections, they should voice them to the couple; but since the two people involved are of legal age, the parents have no authority to forbid the marriage.

       If there's any decision which ought to be made by the individuals involved, between them and the Lord, it is certainly marriage!... When you two have made your choice and settled it with each other and the Lord, we just want to know about it, that's all!... We may not always like your choice, and we may warn you of any serious complication involved, but you're the ones who have to live together, so it's your marriage! (ML #127:9.)

C. Members who have reached the age of 21 may not marry anyone under the age of 18.

       We include this clause because, while it's possible for an 18, 19 or 20-year-old to marry a 16 or 17-year-old, someone who is 21 or older cannot marry someone who is under 18. So a 23-year-old cannot marry a 16 or 17-year-old. If they want to marry, the couple will just have to wait until the younger one reaches 18.

D. Members who have reached the age of 18 who wish to marry someone above the permissible age range for sexual activity as outlined in the Sex and Affection Rules may do so providing they:

1. Enter into a six-month period of engagement.

2. Live in the same Home, but not room together, during the first three months of their engagement.

3. Refrain from sexual activity during th e first three months of the engagement that involves the skin-to-skin touching of each other's genitals.

       There are times an 18, 19 or 20-year-old may fall in love with someone who is considerably older and may wish to marry them. In most countries, 18-year-olds are of legal age for marrying. In order to leave the door open for such a marriage, this clause has been included.

       The restrictions placed on such marriages—namely, the period of engagement being at least six months, living in the sa me Home during the engagement, and refraining from serious sexual activity for the first three months—will hopefully deter any YA and older adult from getting involved for just sex.

       Just the fact that there are some basic restrictions in place for this age group, as for the 16- and 17-year-old marriages (see points following), shows that we consider it to be out of the ordinary and something that would need to be handled slowly and prayerfully.

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E. Members ages 16 and 17 may marr y those ages 16 through 20, providing they each receive permission from at least one parent.

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1. They should receive permission from a parent before beginning the engagement period.

       Because 16- and 17-year-olds are still fairly young and are considered minors in some countries, they must receive permission from a parent prior to the onset of their engagement.

       I definitely think the parents ought to have some say-so about who their own children marry! They should at least infor m their parents that they are getting married.—And it shouldn't be some kind of an after-the-fact letter or something saying that it's already happened, and the parents weren't even given a chance to be notified and informed beforehand, and to approve of it (ML #2589:1,27).

       When a teen couple decide that they would like to get married, they could even start "going steady."—In other words, start seriously working together, having their get-out together, Word time together, etc. Back in the ea rly Letters I strongly advocated this, that prospective couples learn to be real friends and coworkers before even considering marriage! I used to recommend that they work very closely together for at least 3-6 months before marrying!—That way they can make sure it's real love, the Lord's will, and good for His work! (ML #2433:109.)

a) If neither parent of a 16 or 17-year-old reside in the same Home with their teen who wishes to marry, the Home's officers have the authority to override the t een's parents' permission for the marriage.

       We've included this clause to cover a scenario similar to the following: A 16-year-old teen's parents live in Japan and he, their teen son, has moved to Brazil. He joins a Home and falls in love with a girl in the Home. The girl is 17 and her parents live in that Home. The 16-year-old boy and the 17-year-old girl decide that they want to get married. The parents of the girl think it's fine; however, the Home teamwork feels that the couple is not suit ed and the marriage is a recipe for disaster. In the meantime, the teen boy writes his parents and states that he's madly in love with this girl and he thinks she's definitely the woman for him, and the parents, without knowing much about the situation, having heard only their son's side of things, write and say, "Okay, you have our permission."

       Because the teamwork feels that the marriage may not be a good union, and they have major objections to it, they can override the permission of the ab sentee parents, because the absentee parents are not there to personally judge the situation. If the teens get married and the marriage has problems, the Home in which they are residing is going to have to be the one to take care of the problems, so the Home teamwork should have a say in the matter.

       Now if the situation were a bit different, and at least one of the parents of the 16-year-old boy were living in the Home in Brazil, the marriage could go forward even if the Home teamwork didn't t hink it was a good idea, because parents of both teens are resident in the Home and both are in agreement to their teens marrying. So the Home teamwork only has the authority to stop the marriage if either of the teens do not have a parent living in the Home. (This authority only applies to senior teens wishing to marry. Once a young person is 18 years of age or older, marriage is entirely their decision, and no one can prohibit them from getting married.)

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2. Enter into a six-month engagement.

3. After their six-month engagement period is completed, obtain final permission from their parent(s) to marry.

       In order to help two senior teens who may feel they are deeply in love—but who may in reality only be very infatuated with one another—from getting married too quickly, there are additional safeguards.

       First, any teens under 18 years of age must have at least one parent's permission to begin an engagement period. Second, the engagement period has been doubled, to six months instead of just three. Hopefully this additional time will give the Lord time to fully show the young couple His will in the matter. And third, the teens must get their parents' final approval at the end of the six months before actually marrying. If the parents withdraw their consent, the marriage cannot go through, so must at least be postponed.

       During their engagement, the 16 or 17-year-old couple is allowed to have the same sexual interaction as permitted for all other 16- and 1 7-year-olds.

       Of course, becoming engaged in the first place is contingent on whether the 16 or 17-year-old has at least one of his or her parent's permission. If at least one of the 16 or 17-year-old teen's parents don't agree, then a teen under 18 years of age cannot become engaged to be married.

60. PERMANENT MARITAL SEPARATION RULES

       There have been numerous marital separations in the Family over the years. The rules that we are presenting here are significantly different from the rules that have been in place in the past. These new rules go into effect when this document is published (February '95) and govern only those separations that occur from that point onward.

       Any permanent marriage separations that occurred before the publication of the "Fundamental Family Rules" remain in place, unless those separated mutually agree to get back together.

       A permanent marital separation is the act of dissolving a marriage in the Family. If partners need counsel regarding their separation, or the division of their children, they may seek counsel from their Home, area or continental officers.

Rules governing permanent marital separations are as follows:

A. Couples may separate if both parties agree that it is God's will for them to do so. If they don't both agree, the marriage should not be dissolved.

1. If a member loses or forfeits his or her Charter membership, the remaining Charter spouse may dissolve the marriage after six months.

       When couples marry, they are making a pledge to remain married and united for as long as they live, and they should endeavor to make the marriage work. As Dad said, "I just believe in husbands and wives unless there's some terrible reason why they cannot possibly stay together. ... I think when you've got children to consider, you can no longer selfishly consider yourself! You've got a family, and you need to consider the children who need a mother and a father, unless they're grown and married and gone!" (ML #332C:68,76.)

       There are, however, times when the Lord makes it clear to both partners that it is His will for them to no longer remain living and working together as a married couple, that He has a different path for each of them to follow. Their callings may be such that in order for them to both use the ir gifts and talents to the fullest they may need to be in different locations.

       In other cases the couple may have irreconcilable differences, resulting in an inability to harmoniously function together as a married couple. In such cases, if God has clearly shown them both that they should no longer be married and that He has another plan for their lives, they are free to separate if they both agree.

       There will be times when a couple can't decide if they should separate. One partner may feel it's God's will to be apart, while the other partner feels they should remain together. In such cases the couple should seek counsel from their Home teamwork and their VSs, and if necessary, their CROs. These officers should explore the reasons why the marriage is in trouble and offer counsel and prayer to help remedy the matter. They should help the couple assess their marriage, the fruitfulness of the union, the pros and cons of the couple remaining together and of their separating.

       They ma y suggest a temporary separation of a specific amount of time, like three or six months, providing one of the partners can arrange a temporary stay to work in another Home. After this period of time, the couple could reassess their marriage and decide if they should remain apart or get back together. None of these measures can be forced on the couple; they must come to an agreement between themselves as to any changes in their marital situation.

       If, however, in the end they do not mutually agree to a marital separation, then the marriage should not be dissolved, because both partners originally made a mutual vow to be married.

       A marriage, however, can be dissolved if one of the partners loses their Charter membership. If one partner of the marriage ends up moving to Fellow Member status, the marriage can be dissolved after six months, even if the person going to Fellow Member status is not in agreement with the separation. But as long as both members are Charter Members, the marriage cannot be dissolved unless mutually agreed to.

       If all parties concerned are not agreed and consenting, it [divorce] is wrong (ML #647:67).

       Each case is different and each individual situation certainly needs to be handled differently, prayerfully and as led of the Lord! In some cases [leadership] suggested temporary separations. In fact, in some cases that's all that their marriage really needed, and when they separated for a few months they realized how much they actually loved and nee ded each other, and they sincerely wanted to straighten out and get victories, so they went to work on their problems, drew closer to the Lord and were able afterwards to get back together and go on in a much better relationship (ML #2339:29).

B. The parties must reach a mutual agreement regarding the custody of the children from the marriage. The children's preferences should be taken into account and the agreement should reflect the best interests of the children.

       If the partners agree to dissolve the marriage, or if one of the partners has lost their Charter membership and the Charter mate wants to dissolve the marriage, they must come to a mutual agreement regarding the custody of the children from the marriage. They can, and probably should, seek counsel and prayer on this matter from their shepherds, but they must make the decision as to which children go with which parent or if all the children are going to stay with one, etc. If they can't come to an agreement, they should seek counsel from their area office, and if necessary the CRO, who should prayerfully help them assess the situation and make recommendations.

       The dissolving of a marriage and subsequent break-up of a family can be a very traumatic experience for the children. When making the decision as to which children go with which parent, the primary consideration should be what's best for the children. The parents should lay aside their personal interests, wants and desires, as well as any ill will they may feel for each other, and attempt to find what is best for the children. The children's needs and wants should be taken into consideration. All necessary factors should be taken into account and the couple should come to an agreement that reflects the best interests of the children.

       There are many possible options. A couple could agree to a marital separation, but still remain in the same Home; thus their children would still have both the father and mother in the same Home. Another possibility would be for the couple to agree to separate and for each to take some of the children, but to live in nearby Homes for a year, so their children can still easily visit with each other. They may choose to implement an arrangement and then review it regularly to see if the children want to live for a period of time with the other parent. It is ultimately up to the couple to decide what the arrangement will be; though they can seek counsel from leadership.

       If they cannot come to an agreement on their own, and after counsel with the area or continental officers, they may have to move to Fellow Member status in order to work it out.

       If the two mates remain in the Family, they should agree on a division of the children. ... That's up to them. They can make that decision with their leadership's help and advice on where to go and how to split the kids, or who should keep them (ML #2468:91).

C. A written agreement, stating that the marriage is dissolved, and giving details of th e custody of the children, must be signed by both parties and two witnesses using full legal names. Each party should retain a signed and notarized copy, and the same is to be sent to the continental office.

       A written agreement that both parties agree to the marriage ending and specifically listing the final outcome of the children's custody should be signed by both mates and two witnesses, using legal names. (See Agreement of Permanent Separation and Guardianship of Children in Appendix B.) I t would be best if the agreement and the copies were notarized. Both parties should keep a copy and one should be sent to the CRO.

D. Separating couples may choose to legalize their separation and custody agreements by getting a legal divorce.

       Of course the couples can, if they choose, get a legal divorce.

61. PROPHECY RULES

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A. Family members have the final decision as to whether or not to implement the guidance given to them through prophecies received, either by themselves or through others, which will affect their lives or the lives of their children.

       Using the gift of prophecy to help find the Lord's will is a great blessing. As with all prophecies, what the Lord says in prophecy to those seeking guidance in personal matters should be prayerfully interpreted. Whether or not t o implement what the Lord has shown is completely up to the individual(s) the prophecies were given for.

       Mama, our "Winetaster," has approved all prophecies that appear in a WS publication. WS leadership believes and supports and follows the prophecies they send out in the pubs as the Word of God, and encourage all Family members to also believe, support and follow them to the best of their ability and according to their faith.

B. A Home policy or decision that is given in or confirmed by prophecy, must be voted upon and agreed to by the Home's voting members, just like other Home policies or decisions.

       Before implementing a major directional prophecy received for your Home, the voting members must be convinced that it is the Lord's will. The decision would require a simple majority unless it's a financial matter or other decision which the Charter requires a two-thirds majority vote on. If such a matter brings about some confusion or conflict within the Home, the Home should seek the Lord for further confirmation. If further prayer and discussion together and a Home vote can't sort it out, the prophecy should be passed on to your area or continental office for their judgment.

1. Family members or Homes must not implement any prophecies that they receive which contradict the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" or the "Fundamental Family Rules," unless they have first obtained WS leadership permission to do so.

       If, for instance, a Home receives a prophecy that they are to increase the membership of their Home to 100 members, or if a Charter member received a prophecy that they were supposed to have sex with a non-Charter Member, they must first obtain WS leadership permission before doing so, since this would be contravening the Charter.

2. In accordance with the Responsibilities of WS Leadership, B. 1., any new revelatory or directional prophecy received by a Family member must be approved by Mama and Peter and officially and expressly disseminated by WS as such before it would be considered a fundamental Family belief.

       Any major changes in our fundamental Family rules or beliefs will be presented and confirmed in the GNs by Mama, our "Winetaster." (See "Three Gifts of the Lord's Love!," ML #3005:106-129, GN 647, Lifelines 22.)

C. Have the final decision as to whether or not to implement the guidance given to them through prophecies received, either by themselves or through others, which will affect their lives or the lives of thei r children.

       If a prophecy is given for a voting member or their children, the decision to implement or not implement the prophecy is completely up to them. (See also Basic Rights of Individual Members, C.)

       The member should seek the counsel of others who are gifted in interpreting prophecy, when trying to find the meaning of the prophecy. Both the person and those helping with the interpretation should set aside their own opinions, desires and plans and be open to what the Lord has said, but ultimately the decision is up to the individual(s).

       Using the gift of prophecy to help find the Lord's will is a great blessing. As with all prophecies, prophecies received for those seeking guidance should be prayerfully interpreted. Whether or not to implement what the Lord has shown is completely up to the individual(s) they were given for.

       Before implementing the directions of a prophecy received by you or given to you through someone else, you must be convinced that it is the Lord's wi ll for you, and test the prophecy against the other ways to know God's will. You should not let someone pressure you or coerce you through prophecy, or any other means, into doing something which you are not convinced is the Lord's will for you. The Lord expects each one to make the final choice as to what His will is for them.

       Also, in order to clarify how directional prophecies given for a Home are to be judged and interpreted, see the explanation under Rights of the Charter Home, A.

       "Prophecy is only one of the ways that we should use to find God's will. It is not the only way and should not be relied on exclusively. The Word, Godly counsel and the other ways of finding God's will should still be used. The main thing to remember is that in decision-making you must pray and desperately seek the Lord and use all the available means, including prophecy, to find His will" (ML #3019:50, GN 655).

62. CLASSIFICATIONS OF FAMILY MEMBERSHIP AND LITERATURE

       Family membership is divided into four categories: Charter Members, Fellow Members, Live-Out/Catacomb Members and Other Members.

A. CHARTER MEMBERS:

       A Family member who is saved, witnesses, fellowships, tithes, gives a 1% FAF contribution monthly, abides by the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules" and fulfills the Responsibilities of Individual Members.

1. VOTING LIVE-IN MEMBER: A member who has lived in a Charter Home for over six months, and is at least 16 years old.

       Eligible to receive all available Family publications—CM, CM/FM, FM, DFO and GP, unless an age designation stipulated on a specific publication makes them ineligible for that particular publication.

       Membership requirements for the live-ins aren't any different than they have been for many years: saved, number one. Two, they must witness or litness. Three, fellowship!... Four: support, minimum tithes, and five, TRFs in full! Right?—These ar e the absolutely irrevocable, unchangeable Laws of the Family, requirements for membership and the rules for receiving lit! (ML #1730:20,21).

2. MEMBER ON PROBATIONARY STATUS: A live-in member whose Home has placed him on Probationary Status in accordance with the Procedures for Placing a Member on Probationary Status.

       Those who have been placed on Probationary Status can be assigned to read parts or all of the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunicati on in Appendix G and other publications—CM, CM/FM, FM, DFO and GP—at the Home teamwork's discretion. They do not lose their right to read any and all CM lit.

3. NEW DISCIPLE (OR BABE): Non-voting live-in Family member who has joined or rejoined the Family within the last six months.

       Eligible for the following Family publications:

       0-3 months: Babes Basic Course, and GP/DFO publications.

       3-6 months: Hear or read CM and CM/FM publications at the teamwork's discretion, including the Prior ity Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family.

       After 6 months, all other requirements having been met, they become a voting member, eligible to have full access to the CM lit library and receive personal copies of any Charter material sent OPD.

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4. PREVIOUS LIVE-OUT OR CATACOMB MEMBER: A non-voting live-in new disciple who was a Live-out or Catacomb member for at least three months immediately prior to joining full-time, and who completed the entire Babes Basic Course du ring that time.

       Eligible for the following publications:

       0-3 months: Read DFO publications and hear or read CM/FM and CM publications at the teamwork's discretion, including the Priority Reading for New Disciples' First Year in the Family.

       3-6 months: Full access to the CM lit library and receive personal copies of any CM material sent OPD.

       After six months, and all other requirements having been met, become a voting member.

       Not everyone who was at some time a Live-out or Catacomb memb er will be eligible for this upon joining, but only those who held this status immediately prior to joining full-time, and who during that period read the Babes Basic Course. If, for example, a person was a Live-out two years ago and read the Babes Basic Course, but then fell away, only to come back as a Live-out member at a later date, after which they make the decision to join as a full-time member; they would need to read the Babes Basic Course again, just like anyone else joining the Charter Family. This is because one of the main reasons for the Babes Basic Course is to provide a solid Word foundation and a "Back to the Basics" course for anyone who needs grounding in the basics.

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5. TEEN/YA RETURNEE: Teen or YA who has returned to Charter Member status after having been out of the Charter Family no more than six weeks. A Teen/YA returnee age 16 or over retains voting rights, and is thus a voting member, but does not have the Right of Mobility until the Procedures For Accepting Young Returnees Back Into A Charter Home are completed.

       Eligible for the following publications:

       Must read the first five sections of the Basic Letters for Babes. Eligible to hear or read CM/FM and CM publications at the teamwork's discretion. Upon completing the first five sections of the Basic Letters for Babes, they are eligible to read all CM publications, have full access to the CM lit library and receive personal copies of any CM material sent OPD.

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6. A FELLOW MEMBER CHANGING HIS OR HER STATUS TO CHARTER MEMBER—JOINING AN EXISTING CHARTER HOME: A Fellow Member transferring to Charter Member status and moving into an existing Charter Home on a six-month probationary period.

       Eligible for the following publications:

       0-3 months: Must complete the Reading List for Returning FMers or Those on Partial Excommunication, the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       3-6 months: Read CM/FM publications and hear or read C M publications at the teamwork's discretion.

       After 6 months, and the requirements under Procedures for Fellow Members Changing to Charter Member Status and Moving Into an Existing Charter Home having been met, they have full access to the CM lit library and receive personal copies of any CM material sent OPD.

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7. A FELLOW MEMBER CHANGING HIS OR HER STATUS TO CHARTER MEMBER—STARTING THEIR OWN CHARTER HOME: A Fellow Member who is a member of an entire Fellow Member Home that is ret urning to Charter Member status as its own Home, rather than joining an existing Charter Home.

       Eligible for the following publications:

       0-6 months ("probationary period"): Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication, the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules."

       6-12 months ("transitional period"): all CM mailings, providing they are living according to the Charter.

       As outlined in Procedures for Moving Fellow Mem bers to Charter Member Status, D. 1., the six-month "probationary period" can be shortened to three months if the Home completes the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication during that time and meets the other requirements listed.

8. PARTIALLY EXCOMMUNICATED MEMBER: A Charter Member who has been partially excommunicated and must fulfill the requirements in the Procedures for Excommunicating Family Members, A. 2.

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       Eligible to receive all a vailable Family publications—CM, CM/FM, FM, DFO and GP, unless an age designation stipulated on a specific publication makes them ineligible for that particular publication. Must complete the Reading List for Fellow Members Changing to CM or Those on Partial Excommunication during their period of partial excommunication.

B. FELLOW MEMBERS:

1. FELLOW MEMBER: One who is saved, completes a monthly TRF, tithes and fulfills the basic requirements and guidelines of Fellow Members, as outlined i n the Statement on Fellow Members.

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       Eligible for the following publications:

       All expurgated ML volumes up to and including Volume 17 (but not including Volume 4, which has been expunged, or loose CM publications). HomeARC Vol. 1 ('96) and HomeARC '98 (FM version only), and subsequent FM versions of the HomeARC.

       DBs 1-9, the MOPs, CAT book, PUBDEX, Childcare Handbooks, Raise 'em Right, BTH, Marvellous Marriage, LWG, LOG, New Heaven's Children, Techi's Life Story, KTKs, True Komic Volumes, Word Basics, The BEST, The Book of Remembrance 1 and 2, Heavenly Helpers 1, 2 and 5, Activity Books 1-4, The Rhyme Book, Daily-Dex, DMs 1 & 2, Bible in Pictures, How To Love, How To Get Things Done. Fellow Members may order the Love Charter from their continental office if they so desire.

       CM/FM, DFO and GP publications.

       All regular FM and CM/FM mailings providing they meet their reporting requirements.

2. FELLOW MEMBER NEW DISCIPLE: One who has been in the Fellow Member Family fo r less than six months and fulfills the requirements listed in the Statement on Fellow Members. A person can join the Family as a Fellow Member by moving into an existing Fellow Member Home with the agreement of that Home's members, and the new member's commitment to following the principles and guidelines outlined in the Statement on Fellow Members. Or, with continental office approval, a person can join the Family as a Fellow Member by beginning to report as their own Fellow Member Home. (See the Procedure for Non-Family Persons Becoming Fellow Members and Starting Their Own Home.)

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       Eligible for the following lit:

       0-3 months: CM/FM lit at the Home teamwork's discretion. (Fellow Members who begin reporting as their own Home may begin receiving CM/FM lit as soon as they are approved by the continental office and their first report and tithe have been received by the continental office.)

       After 3 months they have full access to the CM/FM lit library and to receive persona l copies of OPD CM/FM material.

       During the first six months in the Family, must read the Babes Basic Course.

C. LIVE-OUT/CATACOMB MEMBERS:

1. LIVE-OUT MEMBERS: Friends who are saved, regularly fellowship with a Home, attend meetings, witness and help a Home, and tithe or give substantially to a Home or WS. (Occasional visitors who drop in once in a great while, or even DF/Follow-up members whom you visit and feed are not to be counted as "Live-outs.")

       Live-outs are required to tithe or give regularly to either your Home or WS. A person who does not have any personal income may not be able to tithe, but those who have a job or any income at all should be taught to tithe, regardless of the amount of the tithe. Live outs can read the Letters designated FM or CM/FM at the Home teamwork's discretion. In special cases, WS may grant permission for a Live-Out member to read CM publications at the teamwork's discretion.

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       Eligible for the following publications:

       GP and DF O publications. Certain CM/FM publications, as well as older CM publications which FMs are eligible for, at the entire Home teamwork's prayerful discretion. (Permission to read other CM publications can be granted by WS leadership in special cases, and these may be taken off the Charter Home's premises at the Home teamwork's discretion.)

2. CATACOMB MEMBERS: These are people who would join a Home, but cannot due to special circumstances, such as being underage, being in military service, in d ebt, etc. They are saved, they witness and/or distribute literature, and they either tithe their income to a Home or WS, or are being taught to tithe. They might not come over for fellowship as often as Live-outs, or attend Home meetings as much as Live-outs, since they might have restrictions set by their parents, the military, etc. But they have progressed beyond the Daily Foods and such Follow-up type courses, are reading more DFO literature than a DF/Follow-up member, and have progressed to the point where they intend to join when the restrictions are lifted. You must have some sort of contact with these people at least once every month in order to list them as members, and to confirm that they are still active members.

       Catacomb members believe and follow Family doctrine as much as possible, and seem to be headed towards becoming either Live-in or Live-out disciples, circumstances permitting and God willing. Catacomb members can read the Letters designated FM or CM/FM that the Ho me feels would be good for them to read. In special cases, WS may grant permission for a Catacomber to read CM publications at the teamwork's discretion.

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       Eligible for the following publications:

       GP and DFO publications. Certain CM/FM publications, as well as older CM publications which FMs are eligible for, at the entire Home teamwork's prayerful discretion. (Permission to read other CM publications can be granted by WS leadership in special cases, and these may be taken off the C harter Home's premises at the Home teamwork's discretion.)

D. OTHER MEMBERS:

       This category includes what used to be DF/Follow-up members, Outside witnessers, Active supporters, Mail ministry and GP members. Homes or areas may still need to keep separate categories for your Other Members, but for WS stats purposes we will now include all these former categories as simply Other Members.

       Eligible for GP and DFO publications only.

APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

       Following are meanings of some of the more difficult or technical words used in the Charter and the "Fundamental Family Rules." The definition of each word or term is according to its usage in this publication, and does not include other possible uses.

       adhere (v)—to hold closely or firmly to

       admonish (v)—to advise a person about his faults or warn about something so that he may be guided to improve

       admonishment (n)—a gentle but earnest reproof or warning

       al locate (v)—to set apart for a special purpose; designate

       ambiguity (n)—lack of clarity; vagueness; uncertainty; able to be understood in more than one way

       amend (v)—to change for the better; improve

       annul (v)—to cancel; abolish; do away with

       apportion (v)—to divide and give out in fair shares

       appropriate (adj)—suitable for a particular person, condition, occasion or place; fitting; (v) to take possession of; seize

       aptitude (n)—natural tendency or talent; ability; special fitne ss

       arbitrate (v)—to give a decision; mediate; judge

       arbitration (n)—the settlement of a matter by someone chosen to be the judge or mediator

       ascertain (v)—to find out for certain; make sure of; determine

       audit (n)—an examination of records or financial accounts; (v) to officially check records or financial accounts

       auspices (n)—protection or support; helpful influences

       autonomy (n)—independence; self-government

       awry (adv)—wrong; out of order

       bona fide (adj)—genuine; witho ut deceit or fraud

       coerce (v)—to force to act or think in a certain way by use of pressure, threats or intimidation

       collectively (adv)—as a group; all together

       compatibility (n)—the ability to get along well together; agreement; harmony

       compel (v)—to force, drive or constrain; to necessitate or pressure by force; to exert a strong irresistible force on

       consecration (n)—dedication to God

       contemplative (adj)—deeply thoughtful; reflective; given to prayer or study

       contravene (v) —to oppose; act in defiance of; violate

       convene (v)—to meet for some purpose; gather in one place; assemble

       countermand (v)—to cancel or reverse (a previously issued order or command)

       criterion (n)—a rule or standard for making a judgement

       de facto—actually existing, whether enacted into law or not, whether intended or not

       debilitating (adv)—making weak or feeble

       debt (n)—something owed to another, which is overdue

       deem (v)—to have an opinion; think, believe or consider

       d efame (v)—speak evil of; harm the reputation of; slander

       deference (n)—a yielding to the judgement, opinion or wishes of another; courteous submission

       demean (v)—to lower in dignity or standing

       deportment (n)—the way a person acts; behavior; conduct

       diatribe (n)—denunciation; speech or discussion bitterly directed against some person or thing

       directive (n)—an order or instruction telling what to do, how to do it, or where to go

       disband (v)—to break up; scatter

       disbursal (n)- -money paid out; expenditure

       disregard (v)—to pay no attention or heed to; ignore

       disruption (n)—an interruption or act which hinders progress or movement

       disseminate (v)—to scatter widely, as in sowing seed; spread abroad; make known

       enactment (n)—the putting of a law, decree or order into effect

       endeavor (v)—to try hard and earnestly; make a concerted effort towards an end

       endowed (v)—provided with some ability, quality or talent

       ensure (v)—to make sure or certain

       entail s (v)—requires or imposes

       errant (adj)—straying from the proper course or place; wrong; mistaken

       erroneous (adj)—containing error; mistaken; incorrect; wrong

       evangelism (n)—zealous preaching and dissemination of the Gospel, such as through missionary work

       expenditure (n)—an expense, outlay of funds

       facilitate (v)—to make easy; assist; help forward (a process)

       ferret (v)—to hunt; search out; discover

       flagrantly (adv)—very offensively; outrageously

       frailties (n)—the condit ion of being weak or frail

       GED—General Education Development (test), often referred to as the high school equivalency test in the U.S.

       get-out (n)—Family term for outside physical exercise and recreation

       harmoniously (adv)—peacefully; getting along well together

       homosexual (adj)—relating to, or having a sexual orientation to persons of the same sex

       illicit (adj)—not sanctioned by custom or law

       impaired (v)—hurt; damaged; weakened; made worse

       imperative (adj)—something that m ust be done; necessary; not to be avoided

       incapacitation (n)—lack of ability, health or fitness

       incur (v)—to bring something on oneself, such as a debt

       infatuated (adj)—having an exaggerated fondness or passion; foolishly in love; adoring

       infringe (v)—to transgress or exceed the limits of; violate

       insure (v)—to cover with insurance

       integral (adj)—essential; necessary to make something complete

       interim (adj)—temporary; for the meantime; provisional

       jeopardy (n)—the risk of loss; danger

       jurisdiction (n)—authority; power; control; the right to give out justice

       just cause—presentation of reasonable grounds and rationale for a proposed action

       liability (n)—money owed which you promise to pay back over time, at a certain rate every month or time period

       liquidating (v)—converting into cash by selling

       logistical (adj)—having to do with the planning or carrying out of some movement or process

       mandate (n)—an authoritative command or instructions; (v) to command

       mete out (v)—distribute; give to each what is due him

       mores (n)—the accepted traditional customs and rules of a particular social group

       myriad (n) a very great number; (adj) countless; innumerable

       objective (adj)—uninfluenced by emotion or personal prejudice; (n) goal; something worked toward

       obligation (n)—a duty arising from a contract, promise, social or moral tie

       orchestrate (v)—to arrange or control the elements of

       overhead (n)—general expenses including rent, ut ilities and repairs

       paramount (adj)—of chief concern or importance

       persistent (adj)—persevering obstinately

       precarious (adj)—dangerous; risky; not safe or secure

       prerogative (n)—an exclusive right or privilege held by a person or group, especially an official or hereditary right

       privy—one who has an interest or part in any action, or is directly affected by it

       procedural (adj)—of or having to do with procedure, especially legal or parliamentary

       proportionate (adj)—being in d ue proportion or ratio

       prospective (adj)—probable; expected; something that is looked forward to as likely

       proxy (n)—one appointed to vote for others at a meeting

       ramifications (n)—developments or consequences growing out of and sometimes complicating a problem, plan or statement

       ratify (v)—to confirm; approve; authorize

       rebuke (v)—to criticize or reprove sharply

       rectify (v)—to make right; change; adjust

       redress (v)—to set right; remedy or rectify; the satisfaction for wrong or injury

       relinquish (v)—to give up; let go; release

       reprimand (n)—a severe, formal, or official rebuke

       reside (v)—to live in a place permanently, or for an extended period

       revamp (v)—patch up; repair; take apart and put together in a new form

       revoke (v)—to void or annul by recalling, withdrawing or reversing

       rudimentary (adj)—elementary; basic; of or relating to basic facts or principles

       sanctity (n)—sacredness; holiness of life

       scenario (n)—the outline of a situation, giving the main facts

       schism (n)—a discord or breach between persons or things, especially within a religious body

       self-determination (n)—determination of one's own fate or course of action without compulsion

       siblings (n)—brothers and/or sisters

       stipulations (n)—arrangements or conditions in an agreement

       subjective (adj)—personal; particular to an individual, or dependent upon his feelings

       succinctly (adv)—expressed briefly and clearly; in a few words

       suspend (v)—to stop or interrupt for a time period; to remove for a time from some privilege or job

       tender (v)—to formally offer

       tenet of faith—an opinion, doctrine or principle held as being true by a person or an organization

       therapeutic (adj)—curative; having to do with the treating of a disease or sickness

       veto (n)—the right or power of one branch of government to refuse approval of measures proposed by another branch, especially the power of the chief executive

       volition (n)—the act of willing; deci sion or choice

       waive (v)—to give up (a claim or right) voluntarily; do without; relinquish

       warranted (adj)—having a good and sufficient reason for an action or belief

       wayward (adj)—turning from the right way; disobedient; willful

       windfall (n)—a sudden, unexpected piece of good fortune or personal gain

       zealous (adj)—actively enthusiastic; eager; earnest; full of zeal

PERSONAL POSSESSION DECLARATION FOR NEW CHARTER MEMBERS

       (To be filled out and signed by new disciples and Fellow Members changing to CM upon moving into a Charter Member Home.)

I, ________________________________________, born ____/____/___, citizen of __________________________, on this the _______(day) of ___________ (month) of ______ (year), being of legal age and sound mind, do hereby declare the following to be my personal assets:

I make this declaration with the understanding that if I choose not to join the Family before I have completed my six months babes basic tr aining, or fulfilled the requirements for Fellow Members Returning to Charter Member Status, that I can take these assets with me upon departing from my Home if I so choose. I also declare that if after my six months or babes training I choose to become a Charter Member of the Family, and am accepted by a simple majority of my Home, that I will work out an agreement with my Home as to which of my personal possessions I would be permitted to take with me should I leave the Home. In accordance wit h Acts 2:44-45 I declare that I will willingly give and share of my possessions with others as they have need, as outlined in the Statement of Commitment for New Disciples.

Signed: __________________________

Witness: __________________________

APPENDIX B: FORMS

STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT FOR NEW DISCIPLES

(To be filled out and signed by new disciples after they have been accepted by a Charter Member Home after their six months of babes basic training.)

I, ________________________________________, born ____/____/___, citizen of __________________________, on this the _______(day) of ___________ (month) of ______ (year), being of legal age and sound mind, having received Jesus Christ as my personal Savior, do hereby declare of my own free will my dec ision to devote my time, energies, talents and material resources to the furtherance of preaching the Gospel into all the world with the Fellowship of Independent Missionary Communities known as "The Family." I have prayerfully studied and accept the Biblical beliefs of The Family as outlined in their Statement of Faith. I have also thoroughly read the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and understand and accept my rights and responsibilities as outlined therein. I acknowledge that the lif e and vocation of a missionary requires a great degree of dedication, sacrifice and the giving of oneself, and hereby do dedicate myself to work in unity and cooperation with my fellow laborers, to fulfill my responsibilities and to abide by the "Fundamental Family Rules" to the best of my ability in order to preach the Gospel to every creature and love the Lord with all my heart and my neighbor as myself (Mark 16:15; Matthew 22:37-40).

       In accordance with Acts 2:44-45 I declare that I will w illingly give and share of my possessions with others as they have need, which is further outlined in the Statement of Commitment for New Disciples. Now that I have become a voting member of the Family, I will work out an agreement with my Home as to which of my personal possessions I would be permitted to take with me should I leave that Home.

       I realize that the Family is a voluntary fellowship, from which I am free to depart at any time. If at any time I fail to fulfil the requirements of a Family member, I will voluntarily relinquish my rights and responsibilities as a Charter Family member and return all necessary publications and Family property.

Signed: __________________________

Witness: __________________________

PERSONAL DATA FOR NEW DISCIPLES FORM

(This form is to be completed in full by all new disciples, 16 years old and above. Please enclose with your TRF)

Date:

Bible name:

Legal name:

Age:       Date of birth: ___/___/___       Sex: M___ F___

Nationality:

Passport and/or ID number:

Names and ages of children joining:

Home number of Home joined:

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, PLEASE CONTACT PARENTS AND/OR NEXT OF KIN

Name:

Address:

Phone number:

Occupation:

Relationship to you:

Attitude of parents (or next of kin) towards the Family (Please briefly describe.):

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

Previous education:

Jobs held:

Languages spoken:

Marital status:

Medical history (Please briefly describe any current afflictions, history of mental illness, handicaps, or long-standing illnesses.):

Former religion:

TALENTS:

Please list what you consider to be your talents and abilities, or profession al qualifications.

Signature

(The following to be filled in by a Home teamwork member before this form is sent to the continental office)

I affirm that this new member has taken his AIDS test and tested negative.

Signature

CLEARANCE REQUEST FORM

(This form is to be filled out when requesting clearance. Your shepherd should send this form to your CRO. You may use the back of this form or attach extra paper if you need more space.)

<<[New]>>

Note to CRO: This form must be answered within 30 days of its receipt, or clearance is automatically granted to the applicant.

1. Date of request: __/__/__

2. Home number:

3. Bible Name

Legal Name

Age

Nationality

Country of Passport

Passport Expiration

Marital Status

4. Country for which clearance is requested:

5. Have you researched the visa requirements for your nationality? Do you feel you can fulfil these requirements, and do you have the faith to obtain some type of permanent visa or the faith/support for any possible visa trips?

6. Financial information (in U.S. dollars):

       a) Amount of landing funds: $

       b) Other support (child benefits/pensions, etc.): $

       c) Expected home support (monthly): $

7. Do you have any legal obligations? (If so, please explain:)

8. Do you, or any member of your family, have any particular ailment that requi res special medical or dietary care? (If so, please explain:) ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

9. Do you plan to open your own Home or have you been invited to an existing Home? Please explain:

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

10. Please give a brief general résumé of countries where you have been, ministries, talents, languages you speak, present burdens, etc. Also include a little run-down on what you consider your main strengths and weaknesses. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________

Signature of applicant (and mate, if applicable)

WANT AD GUIDELINES

Minimum information to be included in a personal Want Ad that you send in for publication:

1. Date: __/__/__

2. Name: ________________

3. Present Home: _____________

4. Age: ___________

5. Time in the Family: ______________

6. Marital Status: ________________

7. Talents/Present Ministries:

8. Any additional pertinent information:

Want Ad (please word exactly as you would like it published).

THIRTY-DAY RIGHT OF MOBILITY NOTICE

(This form must be filled out, turned in to your present teamwork, and sent to your area and continental offices.)

(This first section is to be filled in by departing member[s].)

Date filled in: __/__/__

Bible Name:

Wife/Husband (If applicable)

Children: (If applicable)

Is your Home on Probationary Notice?: Yes __ No __

What ministries or duties must you turn over before moving?

______________________________________________

Where is your desired destination?: Home: ________ City:_________ Country: ______

Do you have clearance?: Yes ___ No ___

Do you have your $50 Tool fund? Yes___ No___

Amount in cash: _______ Amount (value) in tools: ________

Do yo u have notarized permission from your parents and/or guardian to move?: Yes __ No __

(For members 16- and 17 -years of age only.)

I hereby declare that I have met all of the requirements of the Right of Mobility as found in Section 4 of the Charter.

________________

Signature of applicant(s)

(This last section is to be filled out by the applicant's Home teamwork)

Date received this form (which begins 30-day notice): __/__/__

Home number: _________

City:

Portion of debts/liabilities owed by member(s):

Are you requiring the departing member to pay his portion of debts/liabilities?: Yes__ No__

Partially __ (give details)

You as the teamwork of the Home are responsible to pass this form on to the area and continental offices within 7 days of receipt of the same.

Signatures of Home teamwork (At least two teamworkers should sign)

___________________

___________________

___________________

PARENTAL PERMISSION FORM

(This form should be filled out by parents of children who are under 18 years of age, with the original sent to the Home where the child resides, and copies to the area and CRO offices. In addition, it may be advisable to send a separate, notarized letter of permission appointing a temporary guardian for your child.)

Date: ___/___/___

I,__________, do hereby give permission to my son/daughter,

(Bible and Legal Name)

___________ ______ age _____, to exercise his/her Right of Mobility guaranteed by the

(legal name of the child)

Charter of Responsibilities and Rights within the conditions indicated below.

Please check the conditions you agree to, and cross out the ones you do not agree to.

A. UNCONDITIONAL. He/she can move to any Home in any country of the World, within the rules in the Right of Mobility.

__ 1. With my permission only

__ 2. With my permission and/or permission from his/her CRO

B. CONTINENTAL. He/she can move to any Home within their continental area, within the rules in the Right of Mobility.

__ 1. With my permission only

__ 2. With my permission and/or permission from his/her CRO

C. NATIONAL. He/she can move to any Home within their present country, within the rules in the Right of Mobility.

__ 1. With my permission only

__ 2. With my permission and/or permission from his/her CRO

__ 3. With my permission and/or permission from his/her VS

D. CONDITIONAL.

__ Any further moves after this one can only be made if I am informed and authorize such a move through a Parental Permission Form.

In every case I would like to be kept informed of the whereabouts of _________________________ (name of son/daughter) _____________________________

Signature of Parent(s) or guardian(s)_________________________________________________

CLOSING HOME FORM

(To be sent by mail or e-mail to arrive at the area and continental office 30 days prior to planned closing date.)

Date: ___/___/___

Home Number: ____________ City: ____________

Home teamworkers: ____________ ___________

__________ _____________ ___________

____ Number of voting members

____ Number of non-voting members (excluding children)

____ Number of children

Please prayerfully read over and answer the following questions. We ask that all voting members read over and sign this form, then send it to your Reporting office at least 30 days before you're planning to close your Home.

1. Please briefly explain the purpose for disbanding your Home:

2. Date you are planning on closing the Home: ___/___/___

3. Date your PO box will close: ___/___/___

4. Have all stipulations of your rental contract been complied with? ________. If the period of your rental contract is not up, does the contract have a clause allowing you to break the contract?

5. Are you leaving the property in better condition than you found it, as per Dad's counsel? (See ML #2244:68.)

6. Does each member of your Home have a new Home to relocate to? Please give specifics:

7. Total amount of outstanding bills and liabilities:

Total amount of Home loan or Tool debts:

Number of voting members (18 and over) responsible for debts:

Are any voting members exempt from responsibility for debts? If so, please give names a nd reasons:

8. If Home has surplus funds (for example, a one-month buffer), what is planned for these funds? Please specify amount and plans:

9. If Home has other assets, such as a car, video, furniture, lit, etc., what is planned for these? Please specify item and plan:

10. HER funds:

       Total amount received:

       Total amount on hand:

       If HER funds were used, please specify what for:

(On closing the Home, please return all HER funds to your CRO office.)

11. Who is responsible for finishing up business, paying debts, closing the Home, etc.?

(For all the Home's voting members to sign)

I, the undersigned, have read and am in agreement with the above facts and proposals. (If any Home member is not in agreement with any of the above decisions, please explain—this can be in a separate note to your continental office.)

____________

____________

____________

____________

____________

____________

HOME LOAN APPLICATION FORM

(This form should be filled out and sent in to your continental office at the time that you request a Home loan. The Home loan application is to be signed by all of the Home's voting members, 18 and up.)

Date: ___/___/___

Home number: ________

Home loan amount requested: _______

Reason for Home loan request:

(Where applicable) Our bank account information is (name/account number/bank):

**

I hereby agree to the stated Home loan terms mentioned in the Home loan grant letter, and agree to the requested Home loan amount and to repaying a minimum of _____ a month, beginning _____ _____, until the total Home loan amount is repaid.

Signed by Home's voting members, ages 18 and up:

____________ ___________ ____________ _____________

____________ ___________ ____________ _____________

HOME LOAN GRANT FORM

Date: ___/___/___

Dear _________________ Home,

       Concerning your request for a Home loan for ______, we are happy to grant you the following amount: _______.

       We presume you are aware that with the Home loan comes a necessary commitment from all members of your Home ages 18 and up to pay back a minimum of 10% of the total loan on a monthly basis, beginning the month after receipt of your loan. Therefore, in your case, your Home loan monthly payment should be a minimu m of ______ per month, with payment beginning on your report date ______.

       In each case in which a Home loan is granted, we state the terms of the loan to be read and agreed upon by all members of the Home ages 18 and up, so that they are fully aware of the commitment which comes with receiving the Home loan. The basic terms of the Home loan program are as follows:

       1) A two-thirds majority of your Home's voting members, 18 and up, have agreed to the taking out of a Home loan, and are thus res ponsible for the loan. The Home loan is hence allotted to the whole Home, not to just the Home teamwork.

       2) An average monthly repayment of 10% of the original total loan amount is the minimum expected from Home loan recipients. The repayment is to be initiated the month after the loan is received. Your Home should therefore start setting aside that 10% minimum so you can begin making payments the month after the loan is made.

       3) Homes that are delinquent in keeping up with their monthly loa n payments are subject to a penalty which can result in a Home's mailings being withheld until the agreed-upon loan payments are resumed.

       Please remember, your diligence with these monthly payments makes it possible for the Home loan fund, which was so graciously made available to the Family by Dad and Mama because of their love and concern for each of you, to continue to be a future blessing to you and other Family missionaries in your and their time of need. "Seest thou a man diligent in his business? He shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men" (Proverbs 22:29).

       If your Home has any questions in regards to your Home loan, please feel free to ask us. We pray the Home loan your Home is about to receive will be a blessing and help to you, and that it will serve to fill your Home's need. We know your faithfulness to put God's bills first will result in His continued faithful supply of your every need.

With much love and prayers,

Your Continental Officers

CHILD PROGRESS REPORT FORM

(To be sent at least every three months to non-resident parents of children under 18 years old)

Name: __________________________ Date: _______

Age: _________ Location: ____________________

Signed: _______________________ (by shepherd or guardian)

(Please circle the appropriate answer and add any explanation, if needed, in space provided.)

General health (good/fair/sickness?/medical check-up?): _________ _________________________________________________

Sleep (good/fair): Exercise (good/fair):

____________________________________________________

Word time and memorization (good/fair/needs improvement):

Prayer habits (good/fair/needs improvement):

General attitude and behavior (goo d/fair/needs improvement):

Witnessing/outings:

Schooling (participation and general attitude/progress in scholastics):

Vocational training, electives and interests:

Prayer requests/needs:

       [ ] Yes ? [ ] No? Power of Attorney/guardianship papers in order?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? Scholastic records up to date, and kept with guardian?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? Passport, birth certificate, and any other personal ID in order and on hand?

MINIMUM RESPONSIBILITY RELEASE FORM

(To be filled out and signed by a single woman who is releasing the father of her child from his minimum responsibility as outlined in the Sex and Affection Rules, L. and M. starting. This form should also be signed by at least one of the Home's officers as a witness. Copies of this form should be given to the mother, the father, and sent to the Continental Office.)

Date: ___/___/____

Bible name of mother: __________________

Bible name of fat her:___________________

I _________________________________, mother of ______________________, hereby release ____________________________, father of ________________________ , from the remainder of his period of minimum responsibility to care for me and ______________ , for the following reason:

_____________________________________________________________

This release is official as of ___/___/____.

Signature of mother __________________________

(The following to be filled in by at least one Home teamwork member.)

I affirm that _____________________ , mother of _____________________________ , has officially released

_______________________________ , from his minimum responsibility to her and ___________________.

Signature of Home officer:

Signature of Home officer (optional):

Signature of Home officer (optional):

AGREEMENT OF PERMANENT SEPARATION AND GUARDIANSHIP OF CHILDREN

(This form is for the purpose of officially dissolving a marriage and stating who will care for the children of the applicants, as is explained in the Permanent Marital Separation Rules of the "Fundamental Family Rules." Each party should retain a signed and notarized copy of this form, and the same should be sent to the continental office.)

Legal Name of Husband:

Nationality:

Passport or ID Number:

Legal Name of Wife:

Nationality:

Passport or ID Number

Children in care of Husband:

1) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

2) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

3) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: ___ _______

4) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

5) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

Children in care of Wife:

1) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

2) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: __________

3) Name: ________________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: ____________

4) Name:        _______________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: _____________

5) Name: _______________

Nationality: ____________       Passport or ID Number: _____________

Statements from Separating Couple:

I, __________________, the husband of _________________, agree to no longer live together with her as man and wife, or to impose any aspects of marriage upon each other. The children have been placed in each of our care according to mutual agreement and the best interests of all concerned.

Date: ___/___/___

Location:

Signature of Husband:

Signed in the presence of:

_______________________ _____________________

(Witness) (Witness)

I, _________________, the wife of _______________, agree to no longer live together with him as man and wife, or to impose any aspects of marriage upon each other. The children have been placed in each of our care according to mutual agreement and the best interests of all con cerned.

Date: ___/___/___

Location:

Signature of Wife:

Signed in the presence of:

_______________________ _____________________

(Witness) (Witness)

APPENDIX C: HOME SELF-EVALUATION CHECKLIST

<<[New]>>

       (This form is meant to be an easy-reference summary of the Charter, as well as a self-help voluntary checklist that you can avail yourselves of at any time. However, you must fill it out in a Home council meeting every six months, prior to your Home election by your February and August monthly report, and send the results to your continental office, no later than with your February and August monthly report.)

Home number: _________ Date completed: ___/___/___

A few guidelines in filling out this Checklist:

       * The goal of this Checklist is to cause you to evaluate the state of your Home, so you will pray together, discuss any weak areas, and find solutions. It is for your own self-evaluation, to see how you are doing in relation to the guidelines of the Charter.

       * If members have problems with any particular questions that are more subjective, or there is a "no" vote, you should go to the Word, discuss it, and come up with solutions. You should come to an agreement as to how to fix the problems, or come to an agreement as to what is an acceptable level for a "yes" vote. You set this standard yourselves, unless specified otherwise in the Checklist.

       * When voting, there should be a simple show of hands for either a "yes" or "no" vote without argument or discussion to try to change somebody's vote. A tie vote, or equal number of "yes" and "no" votes, would mean a "no" answer on the Checklist, as a simple ma jority must normally carry the vote as a "yes."

       * In answering these questions, we're not expecting perfection, so your answer for many of the questions could be along the lines of "In general, or most of the time, our Home. ..." However, there are some questions which can clearly only be answered by a "yes" or a "no," such as whether everyone's paperwork is in order, whether you've had the required number of Home meetings, whether your children are free from abuse, etc. This is not leeway to loosen up on the minimum Family standards as laid down in the Charter, but we pray it will free you from feeling bound to the letter of the law if, for instance, a child missed ½ hour of sleep one week for some reason. We trust you will know the difference.

       * If a question does not apply to your Home—for example, the questions on parents or children, if your Home does not have children—put "N/A" (not applicable) in the "yes" box.

       * All voting members should try to attend the Home meetings when the Checklist is filled out. If anyone is unable to be present, they could fill out their own copy of the Checklist beforehand, and their vote could be added to the total.

       * This Checklist is to be filled out twice a year, prior to your Home teamwork elections in February and August.

       * The "Personal Questions" section, which is the last section of the Home Self-Evaluation Checklist, is optional and would only need to be filled out or answered if you feel it would be helpful.

       * If you have any questions about any points of the Checklist, please refer to the Charter itself for clarification.

* * * * * * *

I. INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES (We do:)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 1. Endeavor to maintain a close connection with the Lord, through prayer and reading the Word (Bible, Letters and other Family pubs). (1.A; 1.D, E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 2. Believe and teach the Family's fundamental beliefs. (1.B,C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 3. Try to live by the Law of Love. (1.F)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 4. Engage in evangelism regularly (at least two hours/week). (1.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 5. Live according to Acts 2:44-45. (1.J)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 6. Endeavor to be good stewards of Family materials. (1.J)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 7. Bear our share of the Home responsibilities to the best of our ability. (1.K,L,O,Q)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 8. Participate in, abide by, cooperate with and support the Home decisions and live by the Home's agreed-upon regulations. (1.M,N,R)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 9. Endeavor to conduct ourselves as good Christians and Family members. (1.S)

<<[New]>>

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 10. Refrain from activities or behavior that would be a reproach to the cause of Christ and/or reflect negatively on the Family. (1.T)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 11. Endeavor to gain any necessary personal victories. (1.U)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 12. Endeavor to keep clean, well groomed and presentable appearance. (1.V)

<<[New]>>

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 13. Endeavor to stay healthy and physi cally fit. (1.V)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 14. Have a working knowledge of the Charter. (1.W)

II. BASIC RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 15. We feel free to exercise our rights of individual choice and self-determination, and to go according to our own faith in our service for the Lord. (2.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 16. We can freely voice our opinions and vote on Home and area decisions. (2.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 17. We feel we have the final say in medical matters concerning ourse lves and our children. (2.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 18. We have the addresses of, and feel free to communicate with Mama, WS, and our area and continental offices. (2.D)

III. BASIC RIGHTS OF INDIVIDUALS WITHIN THE HOME

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 19. We can freely exercise our right to regularly elect our Home's officers. (3.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 20. The details of the complete financial state of our Home are available to us and we are aware of the responsibilities thereof (N/A for those under 16). (3.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 21. We vote on our Home's financial matters (N/A for those under 18 or new disciples). (3.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 22. We have felt free to bring up any matter before the Home council, and it has been discussed and voted on within 15 days. (3.D)

IV. RIGHT OF MOBILITY

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 23. We are in this Home because we want to be, or we're being allowed to exercise our right to move on. (4.A)

V. RIGHT OF REDRESS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 24. Our rights as Charter Me mbers have not been infringed upon.

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 25. We have not observed the rights of other Charter Members being infringed upon.

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 26. If anyone's answer was "no" to either question 1 or 2 above, they have exercised their responsibility to bring the matter before the responsible parties. (5)

VI. RESPONSIBILITIES OF PARENTS (In our opinion, the parents in this Home:)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 27. Endeavor to raise their children in a Godly manner and give them a knowle dge of God through His Word. (6.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 28. Love, care for, and to the best of their ability supply their children's physical, spiritual, emotional and disciplinary needs. (6.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 29. Protect their children from all forms of abuse. (6.C)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 30. Provide training and sufficient opportunity for their children to witness and share God's love and message of salvation. (6.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 31. See to it that their children are prop erly and sufficiently educated. (6.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 32. Ensure that sufficient academic records are kept of their children's educational progress. (6.F)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 33. Ensure that needed medical care, including regular eye and dental check-ups, are supplied for their children. (6.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 34. Discipline their children according to the standard agreed upon by the voting members of this Home. (6.H)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 35. Any of our children living apart from us ha ve our current address or phone number. (6.I)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 36. Our children have been informed of their rights, and we ensure that these are not being infringed upon. (6.J)

VII. RIGHTS OF PARENTS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 37. Parents/guardians get to spend regular personal time with their children who reside in this Home. (7.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 38. Parents/guardians are living in the same Home as all their children, except where they have mutually agreed otherwise. (7.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 39. Parents/guardians are kept informed of the location, mailing address and have contact with their non-resident children. (7.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 40. Parents/guardians are kept regularly informed of the well being of their children who reside in this Home. (7.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 41. Parents/guardians receive sufficient assistance with the care, parenting and education of their children. (7.F)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 42. Special attention is paid to the needs of our single parents an d their children. (7.F.1)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 43. Parents/guardians have the final say on medical matters concerning their children. (7.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 44. Parents/guardians determine the amount of contact their children have with non-Charter relatives, and the Home members are in agreement. (7.H)

VIII. RIGHTS OF CHILDREN

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 45. Our children have their spiritual, physical and emotional needs met. (8.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 46. Our children are free from any kind of abuse. (One "no" vote on this question would mean a "no" answer to this point, and would justify further investigation and reporting.) (8.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 47. Our children can communicate freely, directly and privately with Mama and/or their continental office. (8.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 48. Our children have sufficient regular Word time. (8.D)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 49. Our children have sufficient opportunity for witnessing activities. (8.E)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 50. Our children and senior teens have sufficient time, opportunity and materials to receive an adequate education. (8.F)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 51. Our children and senior teens can seek to obtain official certification of their schooling, if they desire and the parents agree. (8.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 52. Our children have regular get-out. (8.H)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 53. Children in this Home have at least one parent—or a mutually agreed-upon guardian—living with them. (8.I)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 54. Each child in our Home has the address of non-resident parents, and if any don't, we have taken steps to rectify it. (8.J.1)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 55. Time is allotted on a regular basis for children to communicate with or visit their non-resident parents. (8.J.2)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 56. Children have regular parent time, at least one hour five times a week. (8.K; 57.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 57. Children have regular family days, at least two times per month. (8.K; 57.K)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 58. Children receive needed medical attention. (8.L)

IX. RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS OF THE CHARTER HOME

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 59. No non-Charter members have resided in our Home for over 30 days. (Unanimous) (9.C.2)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 60. Our Home has not resided with non-Charter members for longer than 30 days. (Unanimous) (9.C.1)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 61. Overnight non-Family Member minor visitors have had written permission from a parent/guardian or were accompanied b y them. (9.C.2.b)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 62. Non-Family teens or YAs who have left the Family but are remaining in the Home for a transitional period of time, with permission from the CRO Office, are abiding by the minimum requirements set out for them. (9.C.3.)

X. BASIC RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 63. We endeavor, to the best of our ability, to live and operate in accordance with the Charter of Responsibilities and Rights, and to obey the Fu ndamental Family Rules. (10.A.)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 64. In addition to tithing 10%, our Home shares of its abundance with WS. (10.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 65. We endeavor to achieve the goals of the continental area, country and city in which we live. (10.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 66. Our Home regulations are voted in by a simple majority of Home members. (10.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 67. We work in harmony with other Homes in our continental area and country. (10.I)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 67a. We par ticipate in at least one city council every two months. (10.J)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 68. Our Home refrains from engaging in activities that reflect negatively on other Homes or the Family in general. (10.K)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 69. We have first informed and sought counsel from our continental office before participating in any major media interviews, documentaries, etc.; or else we did not have any such activity this month. (10.L)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 70. We have not engaged in any verbal or wri tten legal agreement in the name of the Family without obtaining written permission from our continental office. (10.M)

XI. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME REGARDING CHILDREN AND PARENTS

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 71. We provide, by whatever means necessary, an adequate education for our children and senior teens, by allocating sufficient time, opportunity and scholastic materials for them to become competent in a manner appropriate to their age, ability and aptitude in basic curric ular subjects. (11.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 72. We allocate sufficient time for the keeping of education records of the children in our Home. (11.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 73. Regardless of the residence of the parents, we keep them informed on a regular basis of the well being of their children under the age of 18 living in this Home. (11.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 74. Parents who have not received a regular evaluation of their non-resident children have taken steps to correct the situation. (11.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 75. We have agreed together upon a discipline standard for our resident children within the bounds of the Child Discipline Rules. (11.H)

XII. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME REGARDING FINANCIAL MATTERS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 76. Our Home lives within its income and is not in debt. (12.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 77. Our Home operates within a monthly budget. (12.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 78. Our Home pays its bills on time and keeps current on its financial liabilities. (12.B )

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 79. If one or all members decide to leave our Home, we abide by the procedures outlined in the Charter. (12.B.3; 4.A.4)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 80. Our Home determines all financial directions and decisions by a two-thirds majority. (12.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 81. Our Home discloses the financial standing of the Home on a regular basis to all voting members. (12.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 82. Our Home discloses to any voting member, 18 years of age or older, who is considering j oining our Home, what the amount of his portion of the Home's debt and liabilities will be. (12.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 83. Each member has their $50 seed corn intact in either funds or tools. (55.C)

XIII. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CHARTER HOME REGARDING THE WELFARE OF ITS MEMBERS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 84. Our Home meets not less than four times each week for united prayer and Word time. (13.A.1)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 85. Our Home allots its members time for Word, prayer or prophecy, w hether private or united, not less than 10½ hours per week. (13.A.2)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 86. Any new disciples in our Home under a year in the Family are allocated an additional 7 hours of Word time per week. (13.A.2.a.)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 87. Our Home supplies and maintains a well-organized Home library of Family pubs, in English and, if necessary, in our local language. (13.A.3)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 88. Our Home immediately posts a list of the contents of new WS mailings, and mak es them available to Home members. (13.A.4)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 89. All pubs purges and BAR pub instructions have been explicitly followed. (13.A.3.a.)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 90. Our Home allots each member of voting age, and 14 and 15 year olds if actively involved in Home ministries, a regular day off, at least every 14 days. (13.A.5)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 91. Our Home maintains a good physical standard and a clean and safe environment. (13.A.6)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 92. Our Home supplies sufficient healthy food. (13.A.7)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 93. Our Home supplies prayer, care, support and medical attention to those who are in need. (13.A.8)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 94. Our Home ensures that its members have sufficient get-out. (13.A.9)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 95. Our Home allocates each member sufficient time for witnessing each week. (13.A.10.)

XIV. RIGHTS OF THE CHARTER HOME

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 96. Our Home has voted, by a two-thirds majority, to determine its basic nature, goals and operating procedures. (14.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 97. The personnel make-up of our Home has been agreed upon by a two-thirds majority. (14.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 98. We have not allowed any members to join our Home who we didn't verify were Charter Members (aside from new disciples or FMs changing to CM). (14.E.1.a)

XV. OBLIGATIONS OF ALL FAMILY OFFICERS (Voting for this section should be carried out by secret ballot in such a way that the voting mem bers can't be recognized by their replies. Two non-teamwork members should tally the votes, which should then be made public and recorded here by a simple majority.)

(Our Home officers:)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 99. Endeavor to carry out the duties of their office in a loving, prayerful and competent manner, and to the best of their ability properly and lovingly shepherd those whom they are responsible for. (23.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 100. Operate within the authority of the "Charter of Responsib ilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules." (23.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 101. Encourage us to live in accordance with the "Charter of Responsibilities and Rights" and the "Fundamental Family Rules," and impose appropriate and proper disciplinary action if we don't. (23.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 102. Endeavor to answer questions and give counsel on how to solve problems by directing us to the appropriate Word, and offer prayerful Word-based advice, in counsel with others as needed. (23.D )

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 103. Ensure, to the best of their ability, that our rights are upheld and are not being infringed upon. (23.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 104. Endeavor to live in accordance with the WS pubs on the subject of wise and loving leadership. (23.F)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 105. Bring up all matters submitted for discussion or vote in a Home council meeting within 15 days. (7.G.)

XVI. RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF HOME OFFICERS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 106. We agree that any discipline we've received has been appropriate and proportionate, and if not, the matter has been brought before the Home officers and/or the Home council. (27.C)

XVII. PROCEDURES FOR PLACING A MEMBER ON PROBATIONARY STATUS

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 107. If anyone in our Home has been placed on Probationary Status, we have followed the procedures outlined in the Charter. (37)

XVIII. FUNDAMENTAL FAMILY RULES

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 108. Any possible excommunicable offenses have been reported. (43)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 109. Members age 16 and above have witnessed outside of the Home a minimum of two hours per week or eight hours per month, health permitting. (44.A)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 110. Our Home gives our children ages 6 to 12 sufficient hours of scholastics for them to become competent according to their age and ability, not less than 12 hours per week. (45.A.1)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 111. Our Home gives our JETTs a minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week. (45.A.2)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 112. Our Home gives our junior teens a minimum of four hours of study time per week, or a minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week if they have not yet completed a junior high school curriculum. (45.A.3)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 113. Our Home gives our senior teens a minimum of four hours of study time per week, or a minimum of eight hours of scholastics per week if they have not yet completed a junior high school curriculum. (45.A .4)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 114. Our children ages 6 through 15 receive two hours a week of local language study as needed. (45.A.5)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 115. Our children are given sufficient Word time to study and make significant progress in the Word Curriculum Course for their age. (45.B)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 116. Our members have spent 1 ½ hours per day or 10½ hours per week in private and/or united reading of God's Word and other WS publications and/or time spent in personal praye r and hearing from the Lord. (50.A)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 117. Our disciples under one year in the Family have spent an additional 7 hours weekly in the Word in order to complete the reading & studying of the full foundation course for new disciples, as well as to complete their basic memory work. (50.A.1)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 118. Our Home keeps at least the minimum schedule requirements for children ages 6 through 15. (45.C)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 119. Any discipline adminis tered to children has been in accordance with the Family Discipline Guidelines. (46.A.)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 120. We avoid eating Biblically unclean food. (47.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 121. We avoid eating foods and drinks with high sugar content, and "junk food" as much as possible. (47.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 122. In general, we do not exceed the weekly maximum alcohol limits. (47.C)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 123. We have not had more than two "special occasions" this month where extra alc ohol was served; and have not exceeded the maximum alcohol limits on those occasions. (47.C.4)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 124. We do not exceed the daily maximum caffeine intake. (47.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 125. All our drivers have valid licenses for the class of vehicle being driven, and are familiar with and obey the driving regulations of our country. (49.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 126. All our vehicles are properly and legally registered and insured. (49.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 127. All our vehicles are safe, well maintained and in good running condition. (49.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 128. Only prayerful, careful and safe drivers are permitted to drive. (49.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 129. If any driver caused an accident, his or her driving privileges were suspended for an appropriate period of time. (49.D)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 130. Any new drivers have received a Family Driving Certificate and been voted as a Home driver by the Home before beginning to drive on their own without ano ther experienced driver. (49.E)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 131. Any members turning 16 have read the required reading list in the Charter before becoming voting members or being allowed to have full sexual activity. (50.C,D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 132. When going off the property, our members obey the two-by-two rule as much as possible. (51.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 133. Our Home takes precautions to keep our mailing and other address lists secure. (51.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 134. Our computer data files are kept encrypted, and are wiped after they have been erased. (51.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 135. We endeavor to protect the safety and security of our Home and other Homes. (51.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 136. Our selah trash is burned safely or shredded regularly. (51.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 137. All our members' personal legal papers are in order and up to date. (51.F)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 138. We use secure phone procedures, utilizing modems and secured e-mail transfers as m uch as possible. (51.G)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 139. [To be filled out only by Homes with four or less voting members:] We have fellowshipped with another nearby Home at least once a month, transport time permitting. (51.H)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 140. If any of our members have outside employment, it has been agreed upon by a two-thirds majority. (51.I)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 141. If any of our children, teens or adults attend outside school or engage in outside classes, we have agreed to it by a two-t hirds majority. (51.J)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 142. As much as possible, we select the movies we view from the WS Movie Lists and are guided by the age group classifications. Any movies not on the list have been previewed before being shown to the Home or children. (51.K)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 143. We follow the counsel given in the pubs when selecting System music and books. (51.L,M)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 144. None of our members smoke. (52.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 145. We have informed o ther Homes about any sicknesses in our Home before contact with them. (52.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 146. All sexual activity in our Home is governed by the Law of Love. (53.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 147. Sex only occurs between consenting partners within the proper age limits and within the restrictions for each age group stated in the Charter. (53.D; 43.D)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 148. Any members who know they have sexual afflictions have informed their partners and have taken necessary precautions, a nd are taking necessary measures to be healed. (53.L)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 149. We refrain from viewing or reading pornographic movies, videos, magazines and books, or engaging in sexual perversions. (53:K,M)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 150. There are no homosexual or lesbian relationships in our Home. (43.B; 53.N)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 151. If a single woman became pregnant, the father is fulfilling his "minimum responsibility" as per the Charter, or else the woman has chosen to r elease him from this responsibility. (53.P)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 152. We conduct our Home elections according to the Home Election Rules. (54.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 153. We follow the rules pertaining to the HER funds. (55.B)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 154. Our Home has a day each month (or two half-days) devoted to prayer, praise and thanksgiving (monthly prayer day). (57.A)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 155. Our Home allocates time for daily prayer vigil. (57.B)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 15 6. Our Home has a minimum of two Home council meetings per month, at least one of which is financial. (57.C)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 157. Our Home has at least one Witnessing Meeting per month. (57.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 158. Our Home has at least one Childcare/Parenting Meeting per month. (57.F)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 159. All members age 9-17 have a minimum of one hour of personal time every two weeks, or a one-hour weekly open forum. (57.H)

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       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 160. Members 18 and older have at least one hour per month of personal time. (57.J)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 161. Any Home members with intentions to marry are following the Marriage Rules. (59.A)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 162. Any underage members engaged to be married have parental permission as per the Marriage Rules. (59.E)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 163. Any separations have followed the Permanent Marital Separation Rules. (60)

XIX. PERSONAL QUESTIONS:

       164. (The following questions are of a more personal nature a nd are not mandatory, but rather are optional for your Home to answer. If your Home does choose to go over these questions, they could be a help to you in evaluating the fruits of the Charter in your Home. Some questions may not apply, especially the outreach-related questions, as they would be dependent on the nature and goals that you've established for your Home.)

       165. (The answers should reflect the sentiments of the majority of your Home's voting members.)

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 166. Would you consider your Home a happy and inspired Home?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 167. Is there a good measure of unity and harmony?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 168. Is the inspiration level in your Home high?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 169. Are the teens getting good shepherding, oversight and training?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 170. Are the teens fulfilled and challenged in their ministries and outreach?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 171. Does your teamwork meet regularly for prayer and counsel?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 172. Is your teamwork working well together and with the Home?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 173. Is your Home's outreach fruitful and inspiring?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 174. Has your Home decided upon a main outreach ministry?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 175. Is your Home well located for your outreach ministry?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 176. Is your Home making progress towards its witnessing goals?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 177. Does your Home have regular visitors?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 178. Is your Home teaching and establishing a "church" of believers on different levels—Catacombers, live-outs, outside witnessers, potential disciples, parents, etc.?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 179. Is your Home making progress in its establishment of a lasting work in your city through faithful follow-up?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 180. Does your Home plan witnessing activities and teams well in advance?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 181. Does your Home have a program or plan to get out the message by distributing a fair amount of tools?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 182. Does your Home have a broader base of support than only tool distribution, such as mail ministry, provisioning, etc.?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 183. Does your Home have a variety of activities, which are a testimony to your neighborhood of your openness and community-service-mindedness, and which also serve as a united-team-effort outlet of initiative for your teens, such as snow shoveling, car washing, organizing "Christian birthday or holiday parties," shop window washing, helping the elderly , etc.?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 184. Did your Home have an "open house" and are you maintaining good public relations with your neighbors and community?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 185. Does your Home help the community in some way, such as having a singing group which sings for institutions, police and firemen, etc.?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 186. Does your Home take advantage of opportunities to witness and be a help and testimony in the community, such as holidays, community festivities or neighborhood need s, mishaps, etc.?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 187. Is your Home reaching the officials of your city?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 188. Do you have regular financial supporters who help cover your main monthly bills such as rent and utilities?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 189. Does your Home have a good provisioning ministry, sufficient for your own needs and with a plan to expand and help others?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 190. Does your Home take extra steps to make sure everyone feels comfortable, inspired and happy with their environment?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 191. Does your Home have an ongoing program of upgrading your schooling equipment and materials?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 192. Are all Home members' sex needs being met, within the proper age limits and restrictions for each age group?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 193. Are people happy and fulfilled in their ministries, and do they feel that they can exercise their gifts and talents to the fullest?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 194. Do you feel your Home officers are involved with the day-to-day Home activities and outreach?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 195. Do you feel that your shepherds have the proper balance, so that they are not overly involved with administration and details in the Home?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 196. Are your children in general happy, bright, spontaneous, outgoing and cheerful?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 197. Do your Home's teachers have time to plan their classes and curriculums, and do they have a schedule and plan for the children to go out witnessing?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 198. Does your Home have an ongoing program of austerity and stewardship training?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 199. Does your Home set financial goals that your Business teamworker helps to oversee?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 200. Is your Home teamwork united, prayerful, and in good counsel about Home goals and activities?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 201. Do your Home teamworkers manifest a love for the Word and desire to uphold it, have a good shepherding heart for people, and outgoing concern to see that people are happy and fulfilled?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 202. Does your Home have a love for the lost, love and concern for your friends and contacts, and pray for and minister to them sincerely?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 203. Does your Home enjoy and love and appreciate your children and time spent with them?

       [ ] Yes? [ ] No? 204. Do your Home officers set a good example of witnessing and love for the lost?

APPENDIX D: HOME ELECTION GUIDELINES

(To be read one week prior to each election date as a reminder of the procedures and responsibilities of electing your Home teamwork.)

       We want you to be able to choose your own Home teamwork, people you love and trust and respect as good shepherds, those who have courage to make the difficult decisions which shepherds need to make, who can encourage you to do your best for the Lord and His work, and who can lovingly correct you when you're not doing y our best. These elections are not popularity contests, and you have a serious responsibility to desperately pray for the Lord to lead and guide you to choose those whom He wants to shepherd the Home. United prayer for the Lord's help and guidance should accompany the elections.

       If you feel your present Home teamwork or individual members of it aren't sufficiently living up to the shepherding standards that Dad and Mama have laid out in the Letters, then you should vote in those whom you feel w ill, including young adults! Please take into consideration that shepherding is a difficult responsibility. It's a very big sacrifice, as shepherds do what often seems like such a thankless job. If you find you're voting out one teamwork after another and you can't find anyone who can do the job the way you think they should, then maybe you're part of the problem; maybe you're extremely difficult to shepherd and need to pray and ask the Lord to help you.—Or maybe you can ask to try the shepherd ing job yourself for a while.

       We want you to have more say in the running of your Home and we want you to decide who shepherds your Home, but in doing so it puts the responsibility of the Home on your shoulders. If your Home doesn't run well, then you're partly to blame, since you elected those who run it. (However, if you feel your Home has problems that can't be resolved on a local level or you're having specific problems with one or more of your shepherds that are hindering your Home, then please be sure to notify your CRO shepherds via their Open Heart box.)

YAs and Senior Teens on Home teamworks

       Most of our young adults have been in the Family for at least 18 years, which is longer than many of our older adults. They have had the Word and the Family principles poured into them since birth, and we feel it's good to allow them to use all that they have learned, to put them in the position to apply their training. Although we older adults have certain experiences that our youn g adults haven't had, they have had a major experience which we have not undergone; they have grown up in the Family!—And because of this, they have a great understanding of how our Family children and teens see things. They understand their needs, desires, frustrations, etc., even better than we do, because they've experienced them.

       If the PER is anything, it's a concerted effort to encourage our teens by trying to understand the needs and desires of our youth and do something about them. Wh o better can help us accomplish that than those who have the experience, our young adults? Therefore, in order to help us better care for our youth, we would like to suggest that when your Home holds its teamwork elections, any mature and responsible young adults or senior teens could be considered for a place on the Home's teamwork, just as any older adult could be considered. (Although the election of a young adult to your Home teamwork is not mandatory, if you have competent young adults in y our Home who could be trained in such responsibilities, we strongly suggest you consider this. Keep in mind that senior teens are not eligible for the Business teamworker position.) Any young adult elected by the Home would have voting power equal to that of the other Home teamworkers. Having a young adult on the teamwork would benefit the young people in the Home by helping them to have more choice in Home matters.

How to Hold Home Elections:

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       1. Election dates: Each Home should hold mandatory Home officer elections every six months, prior to the required date, as stipulated by your respective continental office, for your February and August monthly report. New Homes should hold elections within 7 days of opening, then hold elections at the normal times, so they will be synchronized with other Homes.

       2. Voters include all members of the Home who have reached the age of 16 and who have been in the Family for at least 6 months. Only voting members can be nominated and e lected to Home teamworks.

       3. Nominations for teamwork positions: One week before the election date, the Home should hold a meeting in which Home members can submit nominations for each of the teamwork positions.

       Your first decision or vote should be on how many teamworkers to elect. Even small Homes should have three Home teamworkers. Larger Homes can decide, by a simple majority vote, whether they want to have more than three Home teamwork members. (Smaller Homes might want to have the Busi ness teamworker carry the Outreach portfolio, as suggested in the DTR Letter, rather than electing an Outreach teamworker.)

       Those nominated for teamwork positions should be consulted before their name is brought up for election, in case they don't want the job. Some people might not want the job because they've been teamworkers for years and desperately want a break. Of course, if the nominations are public (verbal), then those people may feel pressured to accept, even though they don't want t he position or don't feel capable of handling it. To avoid this problem, Home members could submit written nominations for teamwork positions, which would give the people nominated a chance to be consulted and either accept or decline the nomination.

       Written nominations also give the shyer people a chance to participate more, since they may not feel as free to voice their opinions. And if anyone feels intimidated nominating people other than the present teamwork members, this would give them a chance to do so in a private manner.

       The names of those nominated should be posted somewhere in the Home so that throughout the week everyone can be reminded who has been nominated. This will give the Home members a full week to think and pray about whom they personally feel would be the best choices to fill the teamwork posts. It's better to refrain from talking with others about whom you or they are going to vote for, as this could cause a rash of gossip, peer pressure or "lobbying" for vot es. Use this week to pray and seek the Lord about the available choices, so that when you do vote you will be voting according to how the Lord has led you and not because someone else has convinced you to vote for a certain person. In cases where some lobbying has taken place, Family members have found it detrimental to the election. Only voting members can be nominated. Since 16- and 17-year-old members have no vote on financial matters, they are not eligible to become Business teamworkers.

       4 . Vote for each teamwork position separately. The order of voting is determined by a simple majority (51% of the Home's voting members).

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       5. Majority rules: Unanimous votes are not necessary. Teamwork positions will be filled by the nominee receiving the greatest number of votes for that position. Once a nominee is elected to one post, then he or she will be out of the running for the other teamwork positions.

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       6. YAs, senior teens or disciples less than one year in t he Family: Because of the immensity of the teamwork job, young adults, senior teens and disciples who have been in the Family for less than one year, who have never been on a Home teamwork before, will be considered "trainees" for their first six months on the job. There are several ways to bring your YAs and new disciples into positions on the Home teamwork, and here are two possibilities:

       a) The first time ever that a young adult or disciple less than one year in the Family is elected to a H ome teamwork, he or she does not have to be voted into a specific teamwork position. For example, your Home can vote in eligible teamworkers to fill the various positions, and you can vote in one or two young adults or disciples less than one year in the Family to also be on the teamwork, but without specific portfolios for the first election period. Giving these folks six months of "on-the-job training" will allow them the opportunity to help out in all of the teamwork responsibilities, and wil l show them, and the Home, which type of shepherding role they are best suited for. If they are re-nominated to the Home teamwork after six months, they could then be elected to fill a specific teamwork position.

       b) Alternately, if they have a special burden and training in a specific ministry or position, such as Childcare or Outreach or Teen/JETT shepherding, they could be voted in as a trainee for that specific position right away, and would work alongside the seasoned adult who was voted i n to hold that position for the entire six months.

       Although "trainees," these young adult and new disciple teamwork members will have a full vote on the teamwork.

       7. Secret ballots: Voting must be conducted by secret ballot. A committee of three people, consisting of one teamwork member and two other non-teamwork members selected by the Home should count the votes. This committee would announce the winners, but the winning margins should remain confidential and not be disclosed to spare the feelings of those who lost.

       The Home can determine the method of voting they use. Some possibilities: If voters are concerned that their secret ballots may be distinguished by their handwriting, one idea would be to use a color-coded system. Each candidate in the running would be assigned a different color, and corresponding slips of colored paper would be available by the ballot box. The ballot box could be left somewhere in a central location, and Home members could come by and place the col or-coded slip of the person they'd like to vote for in the box sometime during the day. The voting could be opened in the morning and votes could be counted that night. (Or instead of color coding the ballots, you could assign each nominee a number, or someone could write or type out duplicate copies of the names of the nominees, so each voter could simply check, circle or underline the name they want to vote for.)

       8. Tie Votes: In the event of a tie vote, hold a run-off election for that posi tion. If the tie is unbroken after three run-off elections, then the Home must decide, by a simple majority, if the two candidates should both become part of the teamwork, or if they should alternate being on the teamwork—one for the first three months of office and the other for the second three months.

       9. Special elections: If a Home loses a teamworker for some reason—his visa is denied, or whatever the case may be—then the Home must hold an election to fill the position within seven days . The person elected to this position holds the office until the next election date or confirmation vote.

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       10. Confirmation votes must be held, by secret ballot, before the required date, as stipulated by your respective continental office, for your May and November monthly report. Voting should be by secret ballot, a simple yes/no type of vote, and must be held to determine whether everyone is happy with the performance of the Home officers. It requires a two-thirds (67%) majority to recall Home officers from office.

       If a two-thirds majority vote against confirming the Home teamwork, the Home will hold new Home elections within seven days in accordance with the Home Election Rules above. The term of office of a Home teamwork in such a case is only until the next Home Election date.

       Much love,

       WS

APPENDIX E: FAMILY DISCIPLINE GUIDELINES: SUMMARY

(Please note that reading this brief summary should not replace the reading of GN 591, which contains the full counsel and further explanation of each of the following points. Please refer to the paragraphs from the GN mentioned below, and also reread the GN from time to time to refresh your memory as to the Discipline Guidelines.)

GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR FAMILY DISCIPLINE

       1. We must provide a loving, happy, secure environment for our chi ldren, making sure that their physical, spiritual and emotional needs are being met. (par.7-11)

       2. The Home should work towards improving its childcare department and helping to lighten the workload of those involved with children. (par.189-191)

       3. Good training helps eliminate the need for much "correctional discipline." Our goal is happy, self-disciplined children who want to do the right thing. (par.12-20)

       4. Parents, or those they appoint in their absence, are the main persons respons ible for the care and conduct of their children. (par.49-57)

       5. Parents, teachers and others working with children need to be familiar with the Family Discipline Guidelines. Failure to heed these guidelines could result in disciplinary action being taken by a Home against a negligent parent or adult. (par.185-188)

       6. All Home members are responsible to monitor the correction of children and young Family members and report to their teamwork any serious neglect or excesses they encounter, or c oncerns they have. (par.5, 182-184)

       7. Home members must meet regularly to establish united behavioral and disciplinary standards. (par.21-30) This involves agreeing on Home rules, defining appropriate correctional methods, and establishing clear limits for any correctional discipline or punishment to be given. The age and maturity of children involved must be taken into consideration.

       8. Clearly inform children of the behavioral rules of the Home and be sure they know the consequences for d isobedience. Keep the standard you expect within reach, the rules few and simple, use moderation, make exceptions if needed, and do not over-correct children. (par.58-62)

       9. Help the child understand what they did wrong and why they are being corrected. Give the child opportunity to explain. (par.80-81)

       10. Correction should be given in love and be well balanced with praise. Do not discipline in anger. Harsh discipline is not the Family way or the Lord's way. (par.89-100)

       11. Be diligent, consistent, moderate, prayerful and Spirit-led; show no favoritism; look for the cause; use wisdom; remain flexible; show mercy when needed; put yourself in their shoes, and pray without ceasing! (par.83-92, 101-108)

SPECIFIC GUIDELINES

       All discipline should be "age-appropriate," "proportionate to the offense" and "reasonable in all circumstances!" (par.123, 125, 128, 142, 154, 159.)

Common Correctional Methods (short of corporal punishment)

       1. Give verbal instruction; let the child kn ow clearly what you expect. (par.118)

       2. Express disappointment or displeasure in a verbal warning. (par.119)

       3. Take away privileges such as video watching, special activity, free time, etc. (par.121)

       4. Impose extra duties (without taking away from the child's get-out or rest time). (par.122)

       5. Restrict conversation (par.124):

       a. This should ideally only be for a few minutes to ½ hour or so, and certainly not more than three hours at one time in any one day. (par.125)

       b. Always al low them to be able to talk to parents, guardians, shepherds or overseers.

       c. Do not use tape, restraint or facial covering, which restricts breathing or speaking, or causes undue embarrassment. (par.126)

       6. Time-out guidelines (par.128-140):

       a. Disruptive younger children can be separated from their peers for a short time, but they should not be left alone.

       b. A child or teen should not be separated for disciplinary reasons for more than three hours a day (preferably much less).

       c. JE TTs on up (12 and up) can be separated from their peers for up to three days as long as it is with the consent of the JETT/teen involved as well as his or her parent or guardian, and the Home teamwork. (A person given such "time out" must be treated with love and respect, and closely and individually shepherded.)

Corporal Punishment

       1. General guidelines:

       a. Corporal punishment should be a last resort after all else has been tried. (par.142, 144)

       b. It should usually only be used when the child has put himself or others at serious risk or harm or has been seriously disobedient. (par.142)

       c. It should not be given out of frustration or anger. (par.144-153)

       d. It should only be administered by parents or those responsible for the child at the time—the teacher, childcare worker, etc. (par.154)

       e. Parents, guardians and Childcare teamworker should counsel and agree together in united meetings as to what disciplinary measures are to be used. (par.155, 156)

       2. Correctional ta ps or swats (par.157):

       a. Should only be given according to pre-discussed guidelines.

       b. May be given at the time of offense.

       c. May only be given on the bottom or offending member.

       d. Should not be given in anger, or with excessive force.

       3. Guidelines for spanking (par.158):

       a. Should be the exception, and never be given in anger or with excessive force.

       b. Reasons for spanking should have been agreed upon ahead of time.

       c. Before spanking, the one doing so should counsel with one other adult, YA or senior teen.

       d. Should only be on the bottom (not bare) (par.158-163):

       —Children 19 months to 4 years: no more than 2 swats on the bottom at any one time.

       —Children age 4 or 5 years: no more than 3 swats on the bottom at any one time (with the hand or a non-damaging, reasonable object, such as a light, flexible slipper).

       —Children ages 6 and over: no more than 6 swats at any one time (except in extremely serious situations, and with the agreement of parent or gu ardian, and shepherds).

       e. Only an adult over 21 should administer spanking for JETTs or teens. (par.158)

       f. Strongly suggest no spankings for teens. (par.158, 164-168)

       g. At least one adult, YA or Senior teen should be a nearby witness (unobtrusively). (par.169) Where this is not possible, it must be reported to the parent or guardian, and shepherd as soon as possible. (par.170)

       h. Parents or guardians of the child as well as the Childcare teamworker should be informed of all spankings that are more than simple correctional taps or swats. (par.158)

       i. Must be administered with love, understanding and forgiveness. (par.171-177)

Don'ts

       1. No public ridicule—no signs, no forced confessions. (par.178)

       2. No forced restraint (except in extreme cases, where violence or injury could otherwise result). (par.179)

       3. No withholding basic needs—daily exercise/meals/sleep. (Nor routine or frequent barring from enjoyable activities.) (par.180-181)

APPENDIX F: BABES BASIC COURSE

       Before joining, in order to ensure that the prospective new disciple has a clear understanding of the Family's basic beliefs, he or she should have read through the publications listed in Procedures for Accepting New Disciples into a Charter Home, B. 3. (If exceptional circumstances necessitate that a new disciple move in before he or she finishes the above-mentioned list, this is permissible. In such a case, those publications should become an integral part o f the new disciple's Babes Basic Course.)

Basic Books/Publications for New Disciples

       The following list contains additional publications, which have been specifically designed to feed new babes and introduce them to our basic Family beliefs. If a prospective new disciple has finished reading the publications listed in Procedures for Accepting New Disciples into a Charter Home, B.3. before being able to join a Family Home, it is suggested that he or she move on to these Basic Books/Publicati ons below. All of these are classified GP or DFO, so copies may be given or loaned to the prospective new disciple to read and study together with Family members or on their own, in or outside the Home.

       If the new disciple has not yet read them before moving into a Charter Home, these Basic Books/Publications should be read in conjunction with the Basic Letters for Babes, which are listed below.

       Because a number of these Basic Books/Publications are quite lengthy, it is not mandatory that ev ery chapter or section be thoroughly read by the new disciple before he or she is allowed to become a voting member once they've been in the Family for six months. (For example, there are sections of the "Basic MOP" which are not as relevant as others; some "Treasures" articles are not as pertinent as others; the "Bible Guidebook" section, part 2 of the "Book of the Future," which consists solely of Scriptures, is quite deep and would be difficult for new babes to grasp.)

       Here now is the listi ng of the Basic Books/Publications for New Disciples:

       "In Search of Truth!" (ML #2465) DB 8.

       "Who Is Jesus?" (ML #2466) DB 8.

       "Treasures"

       "The Memory Book"

       "The Basic MOP"

       "Word Basics"

       "The Book of the Future"

       The following official Family Statements:

              Our Family's Origins

              Quotations from Father David

              The Heritage and Home Life of Our Children

              Christ-Centered Bible-Based Education

              Socialization

              Advantages of Our Family Education

              Attitudes, Conduct, Curren t Beliefs and Teachings Regarding Sex

              Our Response to Allegations of Mind Control and Brainwashing

              Our Stance Against Physical Violence

              A Biblical Perspective on the Jewish People

       Depending on the new disciple's age, background and circumstances, you may or may not also suggest that he or she read the following publications:

              "The Combined Poster Book"

              "Life with Grandpa" (Vol.1-4)

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Memory Verses from the Memory Book for New Disciples:

       A new disciple should endea vor to memorize as many of the following verses as is possible before completing his first six months in the Family - after which they could continue to memorize the remainder of the verses in the Memory Book, or Key Bible Verses, or selected Bible chapters found in the Basic Mop.

       It's not that the verses not included are not important, but since there are 300 verses in the Memory Book, we've cut it down so the minimum amount that new disciples are encouraged to memorize will be attainable for all—given that some will be more gifted in this area than others.

       Salvation - 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 15, 16

       Holy Spirit - 1, 4, 6

       Discipleship - 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11

       Relationship to the World - 1, 2, 3, 4

       Graduates—1, 2, 6, 7

       David - 1

       Our Job - 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 10, 16, 17

       The Word - 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10

       Love - 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 10, 14, 16, 17

       It's Only Jesus!—2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10

       Faith - 1 - 10, 14

       Prayer - 1-6, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15

       Healing - 1, 2, 6, 7, 10, 12, 13

       F reedom from Fear - 1-8, 15, 17

       Overcoming Attacks of the Enemy - 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9

       Trials & Tests - 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12

       Persecution - 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9

       Faithfulness - 1,3

       Obedience - 4

       Yieldedness - 1

       Supply - 1, 2, 3

       Other Special Verses - 8

Basic Letters for Babes

       The following Letters should ideally be read by new disciples within three months of joining. If, due to exceptional circumstances (such as lack of translations in the local language or capable interpreters, for example), the new disciple is not able to complete the Babes Basic Course within three months of joining, he or she must do so before becoming a voting member at six months.

       Potential disciples or Catacombers who have finished the reading list for prospective new disciples may read Letters from the Babes Basic Course before joining. Charter Letters must be read in the Home with a Charter Member.

       New disciples who finish the Babes Basic Course in less than three months may proceed to read titles from the Priority Reading List for New Disciples' First Year in the Family, Appendix H.

       In cases where Daily Bread condensations of Letters exist, babes may read either the full version or DB condo, at their shepherds' discretion. In cases where the assigned Letter is in a volume or DB which contains Charter Letters, the babe's shepherd or teacher will need to either read the Letter with the new disciple, or photocopy it for the new disciple to read privately. ML Volumes, DBs, GNs, etc ., which contain Charter material should not be in the babe's possession except during class time.

       The titles on this list are arranged under 12 general categories. In addition, Letters in the category "Your Spiritual Life and Walk with the Lord" which share the same central theme, such as prayer, have been grouped together. Within each of the 12 categories, the Letters have been arranged in a suggested reading order, progressing from "milkiest" to "meatiest." Please note, however, that the ne w disciple should ideally receive a balanced diet of Letters from the different categories on this list. For example, one day they may read two or three short Letters from the sections "Your Spiritual Life and Walk with the Lord" and "Our Job." Another day they may read a portion of the "Bitterness" GN and a Letter from the "Discipleship" section, etc.

       Please note that some Letters, such as "Beauty for Ashes," are very short, whereas others, like the Self-righteousness GN, are quite long. Some days the new disciple may be able to read several short Letters; other titles may take them several days to read.

       The point of this Letters for New Disciples list (as well as the Basic Books/Publications for New Disciples and the Reading List for Prospective Disciples) is to help the new disciple develop a love for the Word and a solid foundation for their faith. How this can best be achieved will vary from disciple to disciple, so it is important to be Spirit-led and tailor the program to ea ch new disciple's abilities and current needs. Here now is the list of Letters for New Disciples:

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1. THE FAMILY AND WHAT MAKES US DIFFERENT

       "We Are It!" (ML #2222) Vol. 17, DB 8.

       "Mountain Men!" (ML #B) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "Flesh or Spirit?" (ML #45) Vol. 1.

       "Did God Make a Mistake?" (ML #35), Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "God's Explosions I!" (ML #69), Vol. 1.

       "Whose Slave Are You?—God's or Mammon's?" (ML #1332) DB 1.

       "The Law of Love!" (ML #302C) Vol. 3, DB 1.

       "Living the Lord's Law of Love, Part 1" (ML #3201), GN 804, LL 25.

       "God's Guarantees!" (ML #1027) Vol. 9, DB 1.

2. THE WORD

       "The Word, the Word, the Word!" (ML #2484) DB 8.

       "The Memorization Revolution!" (ML #2467) DB 8.

       "What Is the Bible?" (ML #1470) BK5.

       "Interpreting Bible Prophecy!" (ML #2210) Vol. 16, DB 8.

3. YOUR SPIRITUAL LIFE AND WALK WITH THE LORD

       "Sex Works" (ML #306) Vol. 3, DB 6.

       "Diamonds of Dust!" (ML #3) Vol. 1, DB 7.

       "Glamour or Glory?" (ML #328) Vol. 3, DB 6.

       "Hallelujah for Happiness!" (ML #1393) DB 1.

       "Seven Ways to Know God's Will!" (ML #829) Vol. 7, DB 1.

       "Stop!—Look!—Listen!" (ML #74) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "Faith!" (ML #73) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "The Name of Jesus!" (ML #345) Vol. 3, DB 1.

       "Turn On and Tune In!" (ML #2087) Vol. 16, DB 3.

       "Temple Time!" (ML #191) Vol. 2, DB 5.

       "The Operator!" (ML #700) Vol. 5, DB 1.

       "Prayer Jewels!—Part 1" (ML #2623) LL 19, DB 10.

       "Prayer Jewels!—Part 2" (ML #2624) LL 19, DB 10.

       "`When Ye Pray, Use Not Vain Repetitions!' —Mat.6:7" (ML #2914) LL 21, DB 12.

       "Despise Not Prophesying!" (ML #244) Vol.2, DB 5.

       "Love Never Fails!" (ML #25) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "Dumps!" (ML #33) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "But If Not...!" (ML #313) Vol. 3, DB 6.

       "Attack!" (ML #171) Vol. 2, DB 5.

       "Count Your Blessings!" (ML #1259) Vol. 13, DB 1.

       "The Power of Positive Praise!" (ML #1375) BK18, DB 1.

       "Overcoming Negative Thinking!" (ML #2700) LL 19, DB 10.

       "The Handicap of Natural Ability!" (ML #1907) Vol. 15, DB 2.

       "Pride!—The Root o f All Sin!" (ML #1929) Vol. 16, DB 2.

       "Bitterness!" (ML #2672) LL 19, DB 10.

       "Self-righteousness!" (ML #2140) Vol. 16, DB 8.

       "Temptation!—Guard Your Thoughts!" (ML #2423) Vol. 18.

       "Beauty for Ashes!" (ML #114) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "Blessings from Battles!" (ML #2632) LL 19, DB 10.

       "Feeling Close to Jesus!" (ML #2746) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Feeling 'Inspired' to Do God's Will!" (ML #2747) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Obedience Comes First!" (ML #2748) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Feelings and Leadings from the Lord!" (ML #2749) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Communion!" (ML #337B) Vol. 3, DB 6.

4. OUR JOB—Mark 16:15

       "Witnessing!" (ML #344) Vol. 3, DB 8.

       "Reading, Pin-Ups, Mistakes and World Conquest!—Thru' Love!" (ML #151) Vol. 2 (para.44-56), DB 5 (para. 5-14).

       "For God's Sake, Follow God!" (ML #4) Vol. 1, DB 4

       "The Greatest of These Is Love!" (ML #1371) BK4, DB 1.

       "'God Is No Respecter of Persons!'—Acts 10:34." (ML #2909) LL 21, DB 12.

       "Keep It Simple!" (ML #2774) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Souls or Sales?" (ML #2787) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Personal Witnessing Made Simple!" (ML #2788) LL 20, DB 11.

       "You Don't Have to Know All the Answers!" (ML #2791) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Witnessing Is Never Wasted!" (ML #2793) LL 20, DB 11.

       "How to Answer Intellectual Questions!" (ML #2794) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Consider the Poor!"—Psa.41:1" (ML #2755) LL 20, DB 11.

       "Why Witness?" (ML #3132) LL 24.

       "Be a Missionary!" (ML #3135) LL 24.

       "Instant Witnessing!" (ML #3137) LL 24.

5. DISCIPLESHIP

       "The Revolutionary Rules!" ( ML #S) Vol. 1.

       "Yield and Obey!—Parts 1-3" (ML #s 2224, 2225, 2305) Vol. 17, DB 8.

       "Trust and Obey!—Parts 1-3" (ML #2416-2418) Vol. 18, DB 8.

6. FAMILY BELIEFS REGARDING MODERN EDUCATION AND TRENDS

       "There Are Absolutes!" (ML #376) Vol. 3, DB 1.

       "The Big Lie!—Exposed!" (ML #736) Vol. 6, DB 8.

       "Musical Key!" (ML #326) Vol. 3, DB 6.

       "Sequel to 'Musical Key'!" (ML #326A) Vol. 3, DB 6.

       "The Evils of Modern Entertainment!" (ML #2453) Vol. 18.

       "Are You a Good Sport?" (ML #179A) Vo l. 2.

7. DAVID

       "I Gotta Split!—Part 1" (ML #28) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "I Gotta Split!—Part 2" (ML #29) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "David!" (ML #77) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "The Key of David!" (ML #78) Vol. 1, DB 4.

       "The David Prophecies of the Bible" (ML #1642) BK16, DB 2.

     &nbs